The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Charles I"

Showing 1 - 20 of 257

Your search for posts with tags containing Charles I found 257 posts

The faith of treaties exemplified

“A huge bull, snorting fire, rushes with lowered head towards a French fort (left) from which cannon-balls descend upon him. Beneath the fort sansculottes on one knee fire at the bull while standing French soldiers, correctly dressed, also fire. On...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 10 Jan 2022

The Pious Mary Anne Deane (1718-1807)

Mary  Anne Deane was born about 1718 and was believed to be the daughter of John Deane, Governor of India, who died about 1752. Sadly, it’s proving difficult to find anything about this lady’s early life. Teapot with Lid and Cup Inscribed with the...
From: All Things Georgian on 26 May 2021

Restoration 36

Hi there! Last year, my friend Claire Hobson had planned for a day of history talks to coincide with the 360th anniversary of the Restoration of the Stuart monarchy in 1660 with King Charles II. This event was also going to be a fundraiser for the charity,...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 13 May 2021

Charles I, Eikon Basilike (1649)

Scott Schofield Fig. 1: Title page with famous foldout with engraving of Charles I at prayer and “The Explanation of the Embleme.” Call number: A185. Less than six weeks after King Charles I was executed outside the Banqueting Hall at...

Book Review: ‘Royal Mistress’ by Patricia Campbell Horton

‘Royal Mistress’ by Patricia Campbell Horton follows the story of Barbara Villiers from her adolescence, her passionate relationship with her first love, Philip Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield, through her marriage to Roger Palmer, her notorious...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 25 Feb 2021

The Lost Case for Murder: A Guest Post by Stephen M. Carter

The Lost Case for Murder, 6 February 1685 by Stephen M. Carter In today’s social media-filled world, conspiracy theories and fake news spread like a wildfire that burns truth in its path. Therefore, when we look back at history we do so with envy....
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 6 Feb 2021

Book Review: ‘Mistresses’ by Linda Porter

Mistresses: Sex and Scandal at the Court of Charles II, written by historian Linda Porter and published by Picador in 2020, is the second book on the Stuarts of the seventeenth century by Dr Porter, the first being, Royal Renegades: The Children of Charles...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 9 Oct 2020

Alchemy School

 Frontispiece woodcut from De Chemia Senioris, by Zadith ben Hamuel, 1566A common notion holds that alchemists were eccentrics, lone practitioners working in dingy basements, cut off from the rest of the world. This was a myth already well established...
From: Conciatore on 2 Oct 2020

The Man Who Liked Books Too Much

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill PressIn 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked as an alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 7 Aug 2020

Book Review: ‘The Tragic Daughters of Charles I’ by Sarah-Beth Watkins

Far more has been written about the sons of King Charles I and his queen, Henrietta Maria, than about the daughters who were born of the couple—perhaps understandably, since both Charles and James became kings. But with such works as Lady Katherine...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 30 May 2020

Alchemy School

Frontispiece woodcut from De Chemia Senioris, by Zadith ben Hamuel, 1566A common notion holds that alchemists were eccentrics, lone practitioners working in dingy basements, cut off from the rest of the world. This was a myth already well established...
From: Conciatore on 29 Apr 2020

Frances Teresa Stuart: The ‘It’ Girl of the Restoration: A Guest Post by Linda Porter

Bestselling historian Linda Porter @DrLindaPorter1 writes about Frances Teresa Stuart: The 'It' Girl of the Restoration. #KeepItStuart
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 23 Apr 2020

Robin Hood and his Crew of Soldiers (1660)

By Stephen Basdeo This is a précis of a chapter from my book Robin Hood: The Life and Legend of an Outlaw (2019), the Ebook of which is currently on sale from the publisher Pen and Sword (Click Here For More Information). [1] While the late-sixteenth...

Book Review: Royal Harlot by Susan Holloway Scott

'Royal Harlot' by Susan Holloway Scott takes us into the world of Barbara Villiers and her passionate life and great affair with King Charles II.
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 13 Mar 2020

France and Spain Invade England—Almost

On February 6, 1778, France signed two treaties with the United States, one of Amity and Commerce, the other, a defensive Alliance.[1] In them, France... The post France and Spain Invade England—Almost appeared first on Journal of the American...

How Magna Carta Influenced the American Revolution

In 1984, Ross Perot purchased a copy of the 1297 reissuance of the Magna Carta from the Brudenell family who had held the document... The post How Magna Carta Influenced the American Revolution appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Epidemic: Were the Powers that Be Powerless to Prevent the Plague?: A Guest Post by Claire Canary

One of the many things to really slow me down in writing historical fiction is the level of interest I’ve taken in my research. Nevertheless, it’s been the best learning experience of my life! Thanks to works such as Rebecca Rideal’s...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 26 Sep 2019

Seven little known facts about Nell Gwyn: A Guest Post by Deborah Swift

1. Nell experimented with cross-dressing.  Between 1663 and 1667 she posed under the name “William Nell” and adopted a false beard. The disguise stood her in good stead when she needed to act as a man on the stage in March 1667,...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 16 Sep 2019

‘A Gift from the King’ – a Guest Post by Daniel Williams of King Charles I Return

My name is Daniel Williams. For a year and a half, I have been recreating King Charles I and faithfully bringing him to life to the delight (and sometimes bemusement) of the public. My travels have taken me around the UK from Scotland to Isle of Wight...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 12 Sep 2019

Page 1 of 13123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.