The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Charles II"

Showing 1 - 20 of 156

Your search for posts with tags containing Charles II found 156 posts

Prize Season

I’ve had to keep this under my hat for the last couple of months, but now that the decision has been ratified, I’m finally able to announce that I’ve been awarded the Society for Nautical Research’s Anderson Prize for the best...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 10 Dec 2018

Bibliomaniac

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill PressIn 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked as an alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 14 Sep 2018

As Many Babies as Days in a Year

The Countess Margaret of Henneberg and her 365 children. On 19 May 1660 while waiting to escort Charles I back to England, diarist Samuel Pepys made a visit to Loosdiunen in Holland, close to The Hague where the exiled court resided. The reason was to...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 18 Jul 2018

Charles II’s Scottish Coronation: A Guest Post by Cryssa Bazos

The Scottish Coronation of King Charles II by Cryssa Bazos There is an iconic painting of Charles II, commemorating his coronation in 1661 at Westminster, following the Restoration of the monarchy. An ermine robe is draped over his shoulders, he holds...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 21 Mar 2018

Art

Time for some culture, although I can’t help thinking of a quote I first came across when teaching Mussolini’s Italy to schoolchildren some 30 years ago: ‘when I hear the word “culture”, I reach for my gun,’ said, yes,...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 26 Feb 2018

Londoners and the Great Fire: A Guest Post by Jacob F. Field

Londoners and the Great Fire by Jacob F. Field Pepys and his buried parmesan, Charles II and the Duke of York directing the fire-fighting efforts, Lord Mayor Bludworth saying (allegedly) saying ‘Pish! A woman might piss it out!’, Wren’s...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 22 Feb 2018

Shakespeare and the monarchy

The BBC is currently running a Royal Collection season, focusing on the million or so objects owned by British royalty. Many are priceless artefacts, but the Collection also includes objects with extraordinary symbolic and cultural value to the nation....
From: The Shakespeare blog on 20 Jan 2018

Book Review: “Minette” by Melanie Clegg

Published by Madame Guillotine in 2013, Minette is the first part of Melanie Clegg’s two-part series of historical fiction books about Henrietta Anne, youngest daughter of King Charles I of England and his French-born queen, Henrietta Maria. Melanie...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 19 Nov 2017

Bibliomaniac

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill Press In 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked as an alchemist...
From: Conciatore on 27 Oct 2017

Aphra Behn, the first professional woman writer

Aphra Behn, painted by Mary Beale In England, after Shakespeare’s death there followed a period of tremendous change, with the Civil War and execution of the reigning king, Charles 1, followed by the Commonwealth under Cromwell. When the monarchy...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 19 Oct 2017

King Charles II

We tend to start our story here at Culloden with James VII & II but before he became king, it was his brother Charles II who ruled in Scotland and England. Charles II was king of Scotland from 1649 when he was proclaimed by the Parliament of...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 6 Oct 2017

Book Review: “To Catch A King: Charles II’s Great Escape” by Charles Spencer

With To Catch a King: Charles II’s Great Escape, out on the 5th October 2017, Charles Spencer has done it again. As the author of some fantastic books about seventeenth-century Britain, such as my personal favourite, Prince Rupert: The Last...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 4 Oct 2017

Come in Number Thirteen, Your Time Has Come

Last week saw the official publication of my new non-fiction book, Kings of the Sea: Charles II, James II and the Royal Navy, from the wonderful people at Seaforth Publishing. By my reckoning, this is my thirteenth complete book, and my fifth non-fiction...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 25 Sep 2017

Review: “Pleasing Mr Pepys” by Deborah Swift

Pleasing Mr Pepys is the newest work by Deborah Swift and set to release this September (2017), and I was fortunate to have been given an advance review copy. To me, Swift brought Deborah Willet, the Pepyses, and the London...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 31 Jul 2017

17th Century Clock.

More information Here: https://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/lifestyle/house-home/collectors-corner/414418/17th-century-clock-stands-test-time/
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 8 May 2017

‘Loose Amours’, or Love in the time of Plague

In June 1665, Charles II was a king in his prime. At the age of 36, he was five years into his restored reign, virile and interested, he was married to Catherine of Braganza, had a pack of illegitimate offspring, a couple of mistresses, healthy heirs...
From: Restoration London on 13 Apr 2017

You Can Fool Some of the People Some of the Time (Redux)

The current media storm about ‘alternative facts’ put me in mind of a post I first published on 1 November 2011, when this blog was read by two men, a dog, and a vole called Kevin. So I thought I’d re-post it now for a rather wider audience,...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 30 Jan 2017

Footcandy in Salem

And now for the shoes. While I didn’t find the latest PEM blockbuster material exhibition Shoes: Pleasure and Pain to be particularly probing, it was definitely aesthetically pleasing, and I enjoyed the insights into the production and...
From: streets of salem on 28 Nov 2016

The Warship Anne

This week, I’m delighted to welcome Richard Endsor as my guest blogger! Richard will be known to many of you as the leading authority on the design and construction of seventeenth century British warships. His book The Restoration Warship,...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 28 Nov 2016

Bibliomaniac

Broadway Tower, Worcestershire.  The home of Phillipps' Middle Hill Press In 1612, Antonio Neri published his famous book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. [1] The venture was bankrolled by Medici prince Don Antonio for whom Neri had worked...
From: Conciatore on 25 Nov 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.