The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Charles James Fox"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Charles James Fox found 22 posts

A scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern

“Fox and Sheridan (left) sit together at the head of a rectangular table on which is a punch-bowl, &c, looking with dismay at whigs (right), who advance to hurl their wigs at a large pile of wigs on the left (inscribed ‘The Heads having...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Mar 2019

A likeness of Grace Dalrymple Elliott by Thomas Rowlandson

For a woman who was noted as such a beauty, it has always frustrated us that there are not more surviving portraits and drawings of our ‘infamous mistress’, Grace Dalrymple Elliott. There is a miniature by Cosway, painted around the time of...
From: All Things Georgian on 19 Mar 2019

Preliminaries of peace, or, Politicians puzzled

“Members of the Opposition in a row, talk in couples, except for the arch-egotist Erskine (see British Museum satires no. 9246) on the extreme left, who exclaims: “Peace – and I not consulted ’tis very strange, by Gad”. Sheridan...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 19 Feb 2019

The docter [sic] himself pouring out his whole soul for 1 s.

“Dr. James Graham, the famous quack, stands on a small platform or pedestal, addressing an audience of both sexes who sit and stand in front of him. He stands rather to the right of the design looking left, his right hand raised, his left holding...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 18 Dec 2018

The golden image that Nebuchadnezzar the king had set up

“A sequel to British Museum Satires no. 6438. George III, seated on a balloon, points downwards with his sceptre to an image of Pitt (right) as a naked child, on a column which is inscribed ‘Family Presumption’. The king looks down at...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 4 Dec 2018

Lincoln’s History: Sir Cecil Wray

Sir Cecil Wray, 13th Baronet Wray of Glentworth, was born in 1734 into an ancient Lincolnshire family. In 1752, still some months away from his eighteenth birthday, Cecil inherited the baronetcy and the family estates (in Lincolnshire, Norfolk and Yorkshire)...
From: All Things Georgian on 30 Oct 2018

Battledore and shuttlecock

Battledore and shuttlecock was the forerunner of the game we now know as badminton; shuttlecock games go back around 2,000 years and are found in many different countries. Today, we are going to take a look at the game during the long eighteenth-century....
From: All Things Georgian on 2 Oct 2018

The Prince of Wales’ visit to Liverpool in September 1806

During the autumn of 1806, the Prince of Wales (later George IV) and his brother William, Duke of Clarence (later William IV), undertook a tour of several of the counties of England. We are going to look at just one of their destinations today, their...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 Sep 2017

Mary Robinson, Fashion Icon

Earlier this month, Prof. Terry F. Robinson wrote on the 18th-Century Common website about the British actress Mary Robinson (1757?-1800) and how she was an early example of a celebrity who shaped clothing fashion:Mary Robinson’s meteoric rise to...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Aug 2017

Elizabeth Armistead, Wife of Charles James Fo

Last month Geri Walton, author of Marie Antoinette’s Confidante, profiled Elizabeth Armistead (1750-1841).A courtesan and actress in London, Armistead was mistress to the second Viscount Bolingbroke; Gen. Richard Smith, head of the East India Company;...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Aug 2017

Road to Ruin

“Notorious rakes and gamblers ride or run furiously towards rays descending from a sun in the upper left corner of the design inscribed ‘Chance’; its centre, a segment of which is visible, is composed of the letters on an ‘E.O.’...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 4 Apr 2017

John Barker Church: “the mere man of business”?

So was the marriage of Angelica Schuyler (shown here) and John Carter/John Barker Church happy? We don’t have a body of correspondence between them as we have for, say, John and Abigail Adams. But their marriage lasted until their deaths, and they...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jan 2017

The Theft of the Great Seal, 1784

The Great Seal is attached to the official documents of state that require the authorization of the monarch to implement the advice of the government. Lord Chancellor, Edward Thurlow by Thomas Phillips, oil on canvas, 1806 Courtesy of the National Portrait...
From: All Things Georgian on 10 Nov 2016

Removing Symbols of the Old Ways

On 18 July 1776, the Massachusetts Council oversaw the reading of the Declaration of Independence at the State House. Afterwards, the public pulled down the royal emblems of the lion and unicorn from that building and burned them in a big bonfire.In the...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Dec 2015

Hartley and Franklin, Reunited in Paris

I’ve been writing about the on-again, off-again correspondence of Benjamin Franklin and David Hartley, British scientist and Member of Parliament. Their relationship actually turned out to be a factor in the end of the war.After London received news...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Mar 2015

Taking leave

Fox (right), hat in hand, bows humbly before Bonaparte (left), who stands arrogantly, arms akimbo, head in profile to the right. The First Consul wears military uniform, boots, an enormous sword; on his head is a mural crown decorated with a cannon...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Feb 2015

Mrs Bouverie and Mrs Crewe: two Whig hostesses from the 18th Century

Following on from our blog about women in 18th century politics  we found ourselves researching two of the women who have often been mentioned in connection with the Duchess of Devonshire in regard to the political campaign of 1784 where they all three...
From: All Things Georgian on 15 Jan 2015

The magnanimous minister chastiseing [sic] Prussian perfidy

“Fox, wearing a military cocked hat, with civilian dress, threatens Prussia (or Frederick William III) with his sabre, while he puts a foot on the sword that Prussia has dropped. The latter, a grotesque figure with a long pigtail and moustaches,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 14 Apr 2014

Britannia between death and the doctor’s

A satire of Pitt’s return to office in 1804. Pitt is shown in the chamber of Britannia. Britannia sits listlessly on a bed, holding a sword in one hand. Next to her, leaning against the bed, is her shield and olive branches. Pitt holds aloft a...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Jan 2014

A War of Passion: Charles James Fox and the Enthusiasm of the...

A War of Passion: Charles James Fox and the Enthusiasm of the American RevolutionWhile I ponder the warp and woof of the dialogical origins of the American Revolution and what that…View Post
From: Revolutionary Thoughts on 21 Sep 2013

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