The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "China"

Showing 1 - 20 of 108

Your search for posts with tags containing China found 108 posts

November 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “He already makes what is called QUEEN’S WARE, equal to any imported.” When Parliament imposed duties on certain goods imported into the American colonies...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Nov 2020

Colouring metals in the Far East

By Agnese Benzonelli How far can someone go in the name of research? In my case quite a long way. For a month, I loosely taped tiny plates of metal to my hands and woke up every morning with green stains on them. I was investigating craft recipes employed...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Oct 2020

What Makes a Language Policy Revolutionary?

By Gina Anne Tam “Promulgating Mandarin serves the Socialist revolution.” This declaration, part of the keynote address at Shanghai’s sixth annual “Mandarin Promulgation Teaching Achievement exhibition” in 1965, promoted...
From: Age of Revolutions on 14 Oct 2020

Alchemy of Plants

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, f. 9r."Arts Preparatio frugu vel Piantar."In a 1598 manuscript devoted to "all of alchemy", Antonio Neri singled out four particular practices, each of which he made the subject of a detailed illustration. Each is devoted...
From: Conciatore on 23 Sep 2020

Revisiting Yi-Li Wu’s Cold Wombs and Cold Semen: Explaining Sonlessness in Sixteenth-century China

Welcome back to our August 2020 Edition, exploring intersections of race, medicine, sexuality, and gender in recipes. In this 2018 post by Yi-Li Wu, we consider gender, sexuality, the idea of “family,” and their impact on the study of recipes....
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Aug 2020

New Humanist: An Indifference of Birds by Richard Smyth

Every winter, white storks – so elegant in the air, so rickety on land – make the long flight south from Europe to what we assume to be ancestral wetlands in sub-Saharan Africa. At least, that’s what most of them do. These days there’s...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

Revisiting He Bian’s Fetch Me at Pearl Nest Street: Rhubarb Pills as Panacea in Qing China

Today we revisit He Bian’s fascinating post from 2018. Here, He tells us about the global trade in Chinese rhubarb (dahuang) roots, panaceas and notions of difference in premodern theories of the body. Fascinated by this post and want to learn more...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Jul 2020

The efficiency of the Chinese silver standard, 1920-33

According to most of the existing literature, market fragmentation prevailed in China during its Republican and Nationalist periods. Domestic markets were segmented due to a largely self-sufficient peasant economy, backward transport, and low state capacity....
From: Economic Growth in History on 10 Jun 2020

Revisiting Carla Nappi’s “Translating Recipes 1: Narrating Qing Bodies”

Editor’s Note: Today we revisit a classic post from our archives on Late Imperial China by Carla Nappi, which sits the intersection of medicine and storytelling. “Narrating Qing Bodies” kicked off an extended series of translations and...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Apr 2020

Recipes for the Inner Chamber: Vernacular Manufacturing in Early 20th Century China

By Eugenia Lean In the 1910s, a curious print culture phenomenon appeared in China’s urban areas.  Journals such as the Ladies’ Journal (Funü zazhi) and Women’s World (Nüzi shijie) began to run columns and articles that...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Mar 2020

March 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A CHINA MANUFACTURE.” In January 1770 an advertisement for “New China Ware” ran in the Pennsylvania Chronicle.  In it, the “CHINA PROPRIETORS...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Mar 2020

January 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Dealers will meet with the usual encouragement.” As colonists greeted a new decade, the “proprietors of the CHINA WORKS, now erecting in Southwark” took...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Jan 2020

Alchemy of Plants

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, f. 9r."Arts Preparatio frugu vel Piantar."In a 1598 manuscript devoted to "all of alchemy", Antonio Neri singled out four particular practices, each of which he made the subject of a detailed illustration. Each is devoted...
From: Conciatore on 20 Dec 2019

Strategy and revolution: the last words of the Jesuit China Mission?

On the eve of the Seven Years’ War (1756–1763), Voltaire published L’Orphelin de la Chine and the Essai sur les mœurs, marking what is generally seen as the high point of sinophilia in Enlightenment France. In the latter work,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 24 Oct 2019

Tales from the Archives — A Plant for the End of the World

As I sift through materials for my own research on manuals and strategies for famine prevention, I’ve had to spend a lot of time thinking about plants. The near-obsession with the healing properties of plants pervades premodern East Asia, not just...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Oct 2019

Tales from the Archives: Human Milk as Medicine in Imperial China: Practice or Fantasy?

The Recipes Project has over 500 posts in our archives and over 120 pages for readers to sift through. That’s a lot of material! With so much excellent material on the site, it’s easy for earlier pieces to be forgotten. This Tales from the...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Jul 2019

Alchemy of Plants

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, f. 9r."Arts Preparatio frugu vel Piantar."In a 1598 manuscript devoted to "all of alchemy", Antonio Neri singled out four particular practices, each of which he made the subject of a detailed illustration. Each is devoted...
From: Conciatore on 10 May 2019

March 14

GUEST CURATOR: Luke DiCicco What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Essex Gazette (March 14, 1769). “CHOICE green Coffee … also blue and white China Cups and Saucers.” This advertisement features a...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Mar 2019

Making Mr. Song’s Cheeses

By Miranda Brown The subject of this post may strike readers as odd. The combination of “Chinese” and “cheese” brings little to mind: neither memorable textures, nor fragrant flavors. Nothing, not even a single name like Parmesan...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Jan 2019

Cold Wombs and Cold Semen: Explaining Sonlessness in Sixteenth-century China

By Yi-Li Wu Throughout imperial China, a family’s well-being and longevity required the birth of sons. [Fig. 1]  Sons performed the ancestral rites, inherited land, and were responsible for supporting aged parents. And only men could take the...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Dec 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.