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Search Results for "China"

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Your search for posts with tags containing China found 92 posts

Alchemy of Plants

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, f. 9r."Arts Preparatio frugu vel Piantar."In a 1598 manuscript devoted to "all of alchemy", Antonio Neri singled out four particular practices, each of which he made the subject of a detailed illustration. Each is devoted...
From: Conciatore on 10 May 2019

March 14

GUEST CURATOR: Luke DiCicco What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Essex Gazette (March 14, 1769). “CHOICE green Coffee … also blue and white China Cups and Saucers.” This advertisement features a...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Mar 2019

Making Mr. Song’s Cheeses

By Miranda Brown The subject of this post may strike readers as odd. The combination of “Chinese” and “cheese” brings little to mind: neither memorable textures, nor fragrant flavors. Nothing, not even a single name like Parmesan...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Jan 2019

Cold Wombs and Cold Semen: Explaining Sonlessness in Sixteenth-century China

By Yi-Li Wu Throughout imperial China, a family’s well-being and longevity required the birth of sons. [Fig. 1]  Sons performed the ancestral rites, inherited land, and were responsible for supporting aged parents. And only men could take the...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Dec 2018

Searching for Something Special in Northeastern China’s Cuisine

By Loretta E. Kim Mixed noodles with broth and sauce. Credit: Loretta Kim. The “eight major cuisines” (ba da caixi) of China, a culinary taxonomy sometimes reduced to four types and at most expanded to sixteen, reflects Chinese pride in the...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Oct 2018

Exporting the Revolution: American Revolutionaries in the Indies Trade

By Dane A. Morrison In April of 1791, as Capt. Joseph Ingraham of Boston navigated the brigantine Hope through the central Pacific, he encountered a set of islands unmarked on any of the nautical maps he carried.  The Hope was...
From: Age of Revolutions on 1 Oct 2018

Seminars at the Massachusetts Historical Society

As I was trying to sort out the accounts of the New York Tea Party, one of my biggest questions was how the New York Whigs got advance word that James Chambers was bringing in tea. First another merchant captain told the Philadelphia Whigs, who sent word...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Sep 2018

August Anglo-Americana at Auction

August is high season for antique shows and auctions in New England: generally featuring Americana items with global goods mixed in, as our Yankee forebears, particularly those who dwelled in regional seaports like Salem and Portsmouth, were very worldly,...
From: streets of salem on 10 Aug 2018

HEAT! A Recipes Project Thematic Series

As humans, we want to control heat. We want to create heat, temper or even extinguish it, depending on context and purpose. We have a very limited temperature range at which we are comfortable (some microbes and bacteria can survive temperatures as low...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 Aug 2018

Alchemy of Plants

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, f. 9r."Arts Preparatio frugu vel Piantar."In a 1598 manuscript devoted to "all of alchemy", Antonio Neri singled out four particular practices, each of which he made the subject of a detailed illustration. Each is devoted...
From: Conciatore on 20 Jul 2018

Morrison on “Exporting the Revolution” in Exeter, 22 May

On Tuesday, 22 May, the American Independence Museum in Exeter, New Hampshire, will host a lunchtime talk by Dane A. Morrison on “Exporting the Revolution: American Revolutionaries in the Indies Trade.”Morrison, a professor of history at Salem...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 May 2018

Fetch Me at Pearl Nest Street: Rhubarb Pills as Panacea in Qing China

He Bian In the late eighteenth century, American ginseng opened up a new niche market in Qing China. At the same time, Chinese rhubarb (dahuang) roots, harvested from the northwest regions of the empire, were transported by Chinese traders all the way...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 May 2018

Fragrant Protection: Saffron in Medieval China

By Yan Liu In 647, an emissary from Gapi, a kingdom in northern India, presented a plant called “yu gold aromatic” (yu jin xiang) to the court of Tang (618-907). The foreign herb flowered in the ninth month of the year, with the shape...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Apr 2018

The Digitization Dilemma

From my perspective, there are two digitization dilemmas inherent in the Peabody Essex Museum’s plan to relocate the Phillips Library outside of Salem, where it was created over a period of 200+ years. The first is my own dilemma: if the PEM had...
From: streets of salem on 25 Jan 2018

Storytelling and Practical Skills in Medical Recipes

By Ying Zhang What constituted a medical recipe in late imperial China? Literati physicians often touted the efficacy of a medical formula by contending that it conforms to traditional order of the emperor and his officials. They might also praise...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 Dec 2017

China and the American Revolution

Historians are aware that imperial China had ties to the American Revolution. Indeed, James Fichter wrote that “tea, though an Asian commodity, helped bring... The post China and the American Revolution appeared first on Journal of the American...

November 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Massachusetts Gazette (October 29, 1767).“China Ware and Paper, much cheaper than they will come a little while hence.” In an advertisement placed in the Massachusetts...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 1 Nov 2017

Pain, poison, and surgery in fourteenth-century China

Yi-Li Wu It’s hard to set a compound fracture when the patient is in so much pain that he won’t let you touch him. For such situations, the Chinese doctor Wei Yilin (1277-1347) recommended giving the patient a dose of “numbing medicine”...
From: The Recipes Project on 26 Sep 2017

The Alchemy of Plants

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, f. 9r. "Arts Preparatio frugu vel Piantar." In a 1598 manuscript devoted to "all of alchemy", Antonio Neri singled out four particular practices, each of which he made the subject of a detailed illustration. Each is devoted...
From: Conciatore on 11 Sep 2017

The Books and the Wall

I read, in past days, that the man who ordered the construction of the nearly infinite Wall of China was that First Emperor, Shih Huang Ti, who likewise ordered the burning of all the books before him. That the two gigantic operations—the five or...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.