The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Classical Drama"

Your search for posts with tags containing Classical Drama found 9 posts

CFP Reception and Performance of Classical Drama in Early Modern England

Wouldn’t normally post CFPs here, but a friend of mine is organising an exciting conference at the University of Exeter in June on the performance and reception of classical drama in early modern England.  Details can be found here: https://earlyenglishdrama.wordpress.com/2014/03/12/reception-and-performance-of-classical-drama-in-early-modern-england/ 
From: Tympan and Frisket on 12 Mar 2014

Stratford Festival 2013, Day 2: Maria Stuart (Schiller / Cimolino)

I am very glad to say that the Stratford production of Maria Stuart, directed by Antoni Cimolino, is quite, quite excellent. I do go on about how much our theatre lacks stagings of Schiller and other underperformed classics, after all, and I wasn’t...
From: dispositio on 18 Aug 2013

Berlin, Day 9: Kabale und Liebe (Schiller / Peymann), Berliner Ensemble

German stagings of classics are often exciting because they draw attention to the challenges as well as the necessity of playing works of the past — they find an enormous source of energy in the friction between old and new rather than papering...
From: dispositio on 12 May 2013

Berlin, Day 1: Don Juan (Moliere/Pollesch), Volksbühne

Off the plane, into a theatre: and how. The Volksbühne, perhaps the most iconoclastic of Berlin’s publicly funded theatres, launched a three-part Moliere project this year. Of the three productions, one (The Miser, directed by Frank Castorf) is...
From: dispositio on 2 May 2013

A whole lot of theatre excitement

A shamelessly self-indulgent post — I have a very exciting May in Berlin ahead of me. Here’s the itinerary, with lots of links to trailers (almost all the links are in English): May 1: Don Juan (Moliere/Rene Pollesch) – Volksbuehne Part...
From: dispositio on 7 Apr 2013

Lear Alive

Oy. It’s been a while. A stupendously busy January, a long February, ten days in bed with the plague (or else a flu I caught in the UK). Sorry, reader. But I am back with happy news: there IS exciting classical theatre in Canada after all. I have...
From: dispositio on 8 Mar 2013

Toronto Theatre: A Response to Jacob Zimmer

Before I respond to Jacob Zimmer’s thoughtful and generous comments on my “5 Points of Contention,” I first have to give him, or rather his company, Small Wooden Shoe, massive kudos for staging a reading of, would you believe it, Kleist’s...
From: dispositio on 22 Aug 2012

Toronto Theatre: Responses, Part 1

I was a little overwhelmed by the response to my “Five Points of Contention” post. Despite its relentlessly local focus, it quickly saw almost as many hits as my less-than-jolly review of Roland Emmerich’s Anonymous and my attack on...
From: dispositio on 18 Aug 2012

Toronto Theatre: Five Points of Contention

Toronto is a great theatre city. All year long, a wonderful variety of performances are on offer here, from commercial, production-values-driven Mirvish musicals to the fantastic range of shows staged essentially for free and driven by little more than...
From: dispositio on 13 Aug 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.