The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Clergy"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Clergy found 31 posts

“They had never heard of Robin Hood”: Remarks from George Orwell’s “A Clergyman’s Daughter” (1935)

By Stephen Basdeo Robin Hood has on occasion been accused of being a hero who appears mainly in literature for the middle classes. The first ever printed copies of A Gest of Robyn Hode (published in several editions between 1495 and c.1600) were obviously...

An Eighteenth-Century Crusade: The War Against Revolutionary France and the Origins of Modern Catholicism, 1789-99

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Glauco Schettini “Today is the day,” an alarmed...
From: Age of Revolutions on 11 Dec 2019

Rioting Over the Virgin Mary’s Belt: Enlightenment, Reform, and the Religion of the People in Tuscany

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Shaun Blanchard On the evening of the May 20, 1787, a...
From: Age of Revolutions on 9 Dec 2019

Before Papillon: French Guiana and Deported Catholic Clergy

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Erica Johnson Edwards Now an overseas department, French...
From: Age of Revolutions on 2 Dec 2019

Christmass boxes

A satire, divided into quarters, with four small scenes of different episodes of persons trying to collect their Christmas boxes. In the first square in the upper left, a plump supplicant in an apron holds out his hat to a scowling-faced man with a kerchief...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 26 Oct 2018

Sir Harry Trelawny diary

Sir Harry Trewlawny’s diary with the first entry dated 1785 August 17 and the last September 2nd all in a single hand. A wonderfully chatty diary in which he talks about farming matters, the crops that are being harvested, maintaining the shoreline...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 8 Oct 2018

The historians

A lady (Mrs. Catherine Macaulay) with an aquiline profile sits at a table opposite a clergy man (Dr. Wilson) as she writes with a quill pen. The walls are lined with full bookshelves separated in the middle by a fireplace with a mantelpiece on which sits...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 20 Sep 2018

Laura SanghaThe 1559 Book of Common Prayer was one of the key...

Laura SanghaThe 1559 Book of Common Prayer was one of the key texts of the English Reformation. It provided detailed instructions for ministers about what church services should look and sound like, and dictated which passages of scripture were to be...

The Emotional Nature of Belief in Demons

By Juanita Feros Ruys, The University of Sydney One of the most interesting aspects of the intellectual history of the Middle Ages is the question of epistemology: how people ‘knew’ things. This is a particularly pertinent question when, as...
From: Histories of Emotion on 8 Sep 2017

The grounds

Satire on Robert Walpole, showing the grounds for the Motion to remove him from office. Title: The grounds [graphic]. Publication: [London] : [publisher not identified], publish’d according to act of Parliament, March 7, 1741. Catalog...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Jun 2017

“Mixing the Sacred Character, With That of the Statesman”: Review of Pulpit and Nation

According to Spencer McBride, "Americans began to think of themselves as members of a new [nation] in large part because their trusted spiritual leaders told them that they were."
From: The Junto on 16 Mar 2017

Guest Post: Spencer McBride, Benjamin Rush and the Divine Right of Republics

[We are thrilled to have another guest post from Spencer McBride, a historian an editor with the Joseph Smith Papers Project. You can read Spencer’s previous two posts here and here. More importantly, you can order his hot-off-the-press book, Pulpit...
From: The Junto on 13 Jan 2017

A Proposal to Enslave Petty Offenders (1621)

Posted by Krista Kesselring; 10 January 2017 The State Papers contain a remarkable rough draft of an Act intended to condemn petty offenders to slavery. Prepared at the opening of the 1621 parliament by an unknown author, the proposal had the following...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 10 Jan 2017

Majority one against the boroughmongers

A satire on the electoral Reform Bill of 1831, which was passed soon after this print was issued. Grant shows the figure of blind Justice leaning out from a mass of billowing clouds and holding her scales labelled “Reform 1813”. The load on...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 19 Aug 2016

Hot cross bunns, two a penny bunns

“A stout and burly woman stands at a street-door with a large basket of buns. A young woman and three children buy; the children help themselves, the woman holds a plate which she fills with buns. In the background (left) is a Georgian church with...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 16 Jun 2016

May 16, 1532: Convocation Submits and More Resigns

On May 16, 1532, the Convocation of Bishops submitted to Henry VIII, accepting his terms for the future of the Church in England: We your most humble subjects, daily orators and bedes­men of your clergy of England, having our special trust and confidence...

Wife & no wife, or, A trip to the Continent

“The interior of a large church or cathedral. Burke, dressed as a Jesuit, standing within a low, semicircular wall at the foot of a crucifix, marries the Prince of Wales and Mrs. Fitzherbert. The Prince is about to put the ring on her finger. Fox...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 5 Jan 2016

Account book of Rev. Miles Tarn

A personal account book kept by Miles Tarn beginning two years before he attended Queen’s College, Oxford and ending in the year of his death 1797. He provides a biographical sketch as well as details of the births, marriages, and deaths of his...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 3 Sep 2014

The Influence of “the Black Robes”

One of the lesser known but highly influential forces that kept the doctrines of the social contract, natural rights and the rule of law first and foremost in many colonists’ consciousness was the New England Clergy. They believed there was a divine...

‘”Mr Bulcock could no more marry you than that Dog”: making marriage in Lancashire

In 1758 Thomas Whitaker, gentleman, brought a cause of ‘Jactitation of Marriage’ against Ann Lee. In a Jactitation case, the plaintiff tried to stop the defendant from claiming that they were married to each other. Ann Lee’s defence depended upon...
From: Joanne Bailey Muses on History on 2 Jul 2014

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.