The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Coffee"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Coffee found 59 posts

Conflict and the Coffeehouse: Three Stories from Eighteenth-Century Amsterdam

In several Dutch books, plays, and poems written between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, coffeehouses are portrayed as spaces in which rational and civilised conversation took place. According to these texts, the people (more specifically, men)...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 12 Jun 2020

Revisiting Lisa Smith’s Coffee: A Remedy Against the Plague

Editor’s note: Today, we revisit a post by our editor Lisa Smith on the use of coffee as an eighteenth century cure-all against smallpox and the plague. The botanist Richard Bradley claimed that coffee would be effective in treating such diseases...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 May 2020

Plague Time: Intoxicating Spaces and Pestilence in Seventeenth-Century London

One of the most challenging aspects of the lockdown and social distancing measures necessitated by COVID–19 are the restrictions placed on the intoxicating spaces of everyday life. The inability to visit coffee shops, pubs, restaurants and tea bars...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 22 Apr 2020

April 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Genteel Entertainment for Man and Horse.” As Thomas Allen prepared to open the “London COFFEE-HOUSE” near the courthouse in New London, Connecticut, at...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Apr 2020

Ground Level: Exploring London’s Historical Coffeehouses

One of early modern London’s most common intoxicating spaces was the coffeehouse; a 1739 survey by historian and topographer William Maitland identified 551 institutions in the capital (although the real figure was probably higher), while by the...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 11 Feb 2020

8 Intoxicating Objects from Nordiska Museet

A key part of the Intoxicating Spaces project is our work with schools in the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Back in October, a group of 30 pupils from our Stockholm partner school Nacka Gymnasium joined our Swedish research team at Nordiska...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 29 Jan 2020

January 2020: a Taste of “Before ‘Farm to Table'” Part I

Dear Recipes Project community, Happy 2020! This month we’ll mark the new year by highlighting some discoveries from the Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a Mellon initiative in collaborative research...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Jan 2020

Addictive Cinema: 17 Intoxicating Films for the Holiday Season

One of the central and most rewarding aspects of the Intoxicating Spaces project is our work with sixth formers from schools in Utrecht, Oldenburg, Sheffield, and Stockholm. We’re all film-lovers, so Stephen suggested we assemble for our participating...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 16 Dec 2019

Faking It? A Little History of Coffee Substitutes

Seas of rustic little-boy-blue flowers lining the paths stole the show on our summer wanderings through the rolling fields of Thuringia. I bored the kids as I analogously puzzled over its name. Was it a cornflower? Some kind of dandelion? A quick web...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 18 Nov 2019

Margin of Terror: Intoxicating Images and Eerie Etchings at the Bodleian Libraries

One of the key sources we’re using to reconstruct the intoxicating spaces of our four case study cities are the so-called ego documents that proliferated across our period: diaries, letters, memoirs, and travel accounts. Some of the UK’s best...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 31 Oct 2019

New Intoxicants, Slavery, and Empire in the Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Dutch Atlantic

The history of new intoxicants is intimately connected to one of the darkest chapters in history: that on slavery, and the exploitative world economic system that sustained it. The increasing demand for consumables such as sugar, tobacco, and coffee in...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 5 Sep 2019

March 21

GUEST CURATOR: Zachary Dubreuil What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Essex Gazette (March 21, 1769). “CHOICE green Coffee.” In this advertisement William Vans attempted to sell some items, including “CHOICE...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Mar 2019

March 14

GUEST CURATOR: Luke DiCicco What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Essex Gazette (March 14, 1769). “CHOICE green Coffee … also blue and white China Cups and Saucers.” This advertisement features a...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Mar 2019

18C American Women in Business - Women & Coffee Houses in Early Boston

Coffee had been popular in Boston for over a century, when the Revolutionary women of the town became patriotically incensed. Many women owned coffee houses, which traditionally had been frequented by men. Dorothy Jones had been issued a license to sell...
From: 18th-century American Women on 2 Feb 2019

Resolutions Shared by Two Towns 300 Miles Apart

The year was 1773. On May 10, Parliament had passed the Tea Act allowed the East India Company to sell tea directly to the... The post Resolutions Shared by Two Towns 300 Miles Apart appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Henry Laurens in England, 1771–177

On October 9, 1771, a ship arrived at the southwestern tip of England. The Earl of Halifax had spent twenty nine days crossing the Atlantic... The post Henry Laurens in England, 1771–1772 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

How to Make Cold-Brewed Coffee, 185

Coffee plant (c. 1823)"Take four ounces of good coffee, properly roasted and ground. Dilute it in two glasses of cold water with a spoon. Let it steep all night, covering the vessel which contains it. Next day, pour the pap with care on fine linen placed...
From: Ask the Past on 6 Aug 2018

April 15

GUEST CURATOR:  Kurt Falter What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette (April 15, 1768).“A few Cask choice Jamaica Sugar & Coffee.” It is without question that coffee is far more...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Apr 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.