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Your search for posts with tags containing Collections found 390 posts

Reading Austen in America, Juliette Wells

Good news for Janeites who live within striking distance of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD! At 7:00 PM EST on April 29th, the Bird in Hand, a cafe/bookstore, will be offering the first in a series of workshops on the last Monday of each month...
From: Jane Austen's World on 23 Apr 2019

Review, Rebecca Brannon and Joseph Moore, eds. The Consequences of Loyalism

Brannon, Rebecca, and Joseph S. Moore, eds. The Consequences of Loyalism: Essays in Honor of Robert M. Calhoon. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2019). If you are studying or researching Loyalists in some way, Robert M. Calhoon’s...
From: The Junto on 22 Apr 2019

The Mysterious Mother Mini-Conference: Session I

Session I of The Mysterious Monther mini-conference on May 3, 2018, held at the Yale Center for British Art, was titled “Reading The Mysterious Mother” and was chaired by Jill Campbell, Professor of English, Yale University.  Session...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 18 Apr 2019

A catalogue of the superb and elegant household furniture

“To be viewed three days (Sunday excepted) preceding the sale, when catalogues will be delivered …, which may be had on the premises, and of Messrs. Skinner and Dyke, Aldersgate Street.” Author: Skinner and Dyke. Title: A...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 1 Apr 2019

Navigating New-to-You Rare Book & Special Collection Libraries: A Working List of Questions to Ask

Early modern play quartos with fresh call slips in the reading room at the Harry Ransom Center (UT-Austin). I have spent a good deal of time in rare book and manuscript libraries over the past twelve...

Symposium : « La Collection Courtauld : le parti de l’impressionnisme » (Paris, 21 mars 2019)

A l’occasion de l’exposition La Collection Courtauld. Le parti de l’impressionnisme, du 20 février au 17 juin 2019, la Fondation Vuitton organise quatre tables rondes réunissant historiens de l’art, conservateurs,...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 20 Mar 2019

Untangling Lady Day dating and the Julian calendar

Folger X.c.92 (3) is my new favorite manuscript: it’s a letter written in Paris that single-handedly demonstrates the fact that “new style” dates refer to two different calendar modernizations. One modernization has to do with the Christian...
From: The Collation on 12 Feb 2019

Pre-Modern High Tech

Last month the Washington Post ran a short article by Erin Blakemore on medieval scientific instruments, “Think smartphones are astonishing? Discover the ‘high tech’ devices of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.” It was a little...
From: Darin Hayton on 8 Jan 2019

Forster’s Synchronism and 18th-Century Studies

The British Library Reading Room, c. 1924. In the preface to The Rape of Clarissa, Terry Eagleton embraces, under the sign of Benjamin, a strategic presentism (though this is not his phrase) that understands the work of criticism to be a kind of textual...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 20 Nov 2018

“Strategic Presentism” and 18th-Century Studies

My deepest thanks to Katarzyna Bartoszynska and Eugenia Zuroski for having me on this panel alongside this great lineup of people I admire.  It’s a pleasure to have Anna Kornbluh here to help us think through what V21 might have to offer us...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 19 Nov 2018

The “Ordinary Science” of Literary Studies

When V21 and the V21 manifesto first appeared a few years ago I was very excited and something of a cheerleader from the sidelines of social media. Who doesn’t like a group of younger scholars standing up and telling the older generation that it...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 19 Nov 2018

“Dialectical Presentism:” Race, Empire, and Slavery in 18th-Century Studies

Like many of you, I’ve followed the V21 developments with much interest and excitement, if I’ve largely done so from the margins (this is the first time I’ve been a part of any formal discussion about V21).  There are so many things...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 18 Nov 2018

ASECS and V21 Roundtable Organizers’ Response: Collective Ways Forward

When we put out the call for participants on this roundtable, we asked whether eighteenth-century studies needed its own V21 moment, but we must confess that in thinking about the relationship between the two communities, we found ourselves wondering,...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 18 Nov 2018

Reframing the Pregnancy Story: On Literature, Stitching, and Lost Narratives

This essay is republished with permission from Nursing Clio, where it first appeared. An 1805 needlework mourning picture with two embroidered inscriptions that read: “In Memory / of / Henry Ten Eyck / obit 1st July 1794 / AEt: 8 Yrs & 5 Mths”...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 12 Nov 2018

Writing The King’s Favorite

From a dedicated and, I guess, decent enough scholar to an unabashed and unapologetic novelist, my journey has culminated in a novel employing my previous scholarship and deep interest in one of the most fascinating, yet still generally under-appreciated,...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 9 Nov 2018

A Dwarf and his Skeleton

Last month I spent some time in Special Collections at the University of Glasgow Library, looking at the catalogues of the anatomical preparations of London anatomist and man-midwife William Hunter (1718-1783).  Hunter, a Scot, left his collections...
From: Anita Guerrini on 20 Aug 2018

The devil is in the details: turpentine varnish

Corrosion cast of bronchi and trachea, possibly from a rabbit, sheep, or dog, 1880-1890Likely prepared by Harvard anatomist Samuel J. Mixter.The Warren Anatomical Museum in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine This post first appeared on The...
From: The Medicine Chest on 6 Jun 2018

The Life Writing of Elizabeth Marsh, an Eighteenth-Century Global Woman

As I found it in vain to contend, I had a trunk opened, and they fixed the cloaths I was to put on, which were very new; but I wrapped up my head in a night cap…as I was told they did not intend to let me wear a hat. When I was ornamented, as they...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 6 Jun 2018

Janet Lunn and the Serious Work of Writing for Children

Figure 1: Janet Lunn, 1928-2017 Janet Lunn, a writer of historical fiction for young people and a strong advocate for the importance of children’s literature, ruefully claimed that it was not an esteemed occupation. But her description of the arduous,...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 4 Jun 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.