The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Commerce"

Showing 1 - 20 of 28

Your search for posts with tags containing Commerce found 28 posts

December 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “FOR NEWRY, The SHIP SALLY, WILLIAM KEITH, Master.” Readers of the Pennsylvania Chronicle, and, especially, the Pennsylvania Gazette and the Pennsylvania Journal did...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Dec 2020

Colloque en ligne : « Beyond Borders: The key for art market power » (2 et 3 novembre 2020)

Beyond Borders: The key for art market power conference will take place on Zoom on November 2 and 3, 2020. Admission is free, but registration is required and is now open. The number of places is limited, so early registration is recommended. This international...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 8 Oct 2020

September 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “At the Black Boy and Butt in Cornhill.” In an advertisement in the September 13, 1770, edition of the Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News-Letter, Jonathan...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Sep 2020

October 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? South-Carolina Gazette (October 26, 1769). “Neat Worsted Stuffs, proper for Negro Wenches Gowns.” Fourteen notices concerning enslaved men, women, and children appeared...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Oct 2019

October 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Pennsylvania Gazette (September 28, 1769). “A likely healthy Negroe … to dispose of.” Shopkeeper Magdalen Devine occasionally advertised in the Pennsylvania Gazette...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 1 Oct 2019

April 24

GUEST CURATOR: Samantha Surowiec What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston Chronicle (April 24, 1769). “TO BE SOLD, the SHIP AMERICA.” Being from Massachusetts, I have spent time in major port cities...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Apr 2019

February 26

GUEST CURATOR: Chloe Amour What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Boston Evening-Post (February 20, 1769). “Two Tierces of SUGAR of the first Quality.” Sugar was a sought-after consumer good, closely...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Feb 2019

December 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (December 10, 1768).“The Sign of the Black Boy and Butt.” No advertisements for enslaved men, women, and children happened to appear in the December...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Dec 2018

Women in 17th Century New England

.In 17th century New England, women usually arrived with family members to band together in cooperative religious communities organized for the collective good which included shared economic goals. Almost immediately, their healthier living conditions...
From: 17th-century American Women on 23 Jun 2013

Golden Hill Roundtable: Retracing Mr. Smith’s Steps Through Eighteenth-Century Manhattan

Today, Katy Lasdow uses digital maps to retrace Mr. Smith's steps through eighteenth-century Manhattan in our Golden Hill roundtable.
From: The Junto on 5 Jul 2018

Golden Hill Roundtable: Courage and Cowardice?

"What a pleasure it is to wander around mid-eighteenth-century New York City with Francis Spufford, admiring the city's homes with their "stepped Dutchwork eaves" and their "blue-gray pediment[s] of Connecticut pine". What a pleasure, too, to join him...
From: The Junto on 4 Jul 2018

Golden Hill Roundtable: “Commerce is Trust”

This week at the Junto, we’ll be featuring a roundtable on Francis Spufford’s 2016 novel, Golden Hill (Faber & Faber: London, 2016). Set in colonial New York city, and written in self-conscious homage to eighteenth-century literary style,...
From: The Junto on 2 Jul 2018

The case of the Joyners Company…

Author: Joyners Company (London, England) Title: The case of the Joyners Company against the importation of manufactured cabinet-work from the East-Indies. Published: [London] : [publisher not identified], [1710?]...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 10 May 2018

April 8

GUEST CURATOR:  Jonathan Biscelgia What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-Hampshire Gazette (April 8, 1768).“A few Hogsheads of Choice old Rum.” This advertisement from the New Hampshire Gazette appears...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Apr 2018

Advertising Tobacco Over There -1577

1577 Of the Tabaco and of His Greate Vertues The earliest known image of a man smoking, from Tabaco by Anthony Chute. 1590s. Chute was an Elizabethan poet and pamphleteer.  Text from John Frampton's translation of Nicholas Monardes. It was published...
From: 17th-century American Women on 9 Aug 2017

The British American Colonies - Evoving from a Territory to a Hub of Commerce

Trafique, Commerce, and Trade are those great wheels that by their circular and continued motion turn into most Kingdoms of the Earth the plenty of abundant Riches that they are commonly fed withall: For Trafique in his right description is the very soul...
From: 17th-century American Women on 15 Jun 2017

Civitas Bristol

A decree of the Common Council of Bristol signed: Cann. The wood-engraved of the Bristol city arms is between “Civitas” and “Bristol.” Author: Bristol (England) Title: Civitas Bristol. Tempore Petri Day, ar’...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Dec 2016

Bristol markets

The tickets could be had of William Ludlow, deputy clerk of the markets Creator: Bristol (England) Title: Bristol markets : In consequence of many frauds and impositions practised by sundry persons carrying provisions for the inhabitants,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 24 Oct 2016

Appel à candidature : Prix Marianne et Roland Michel

En souvenir de Marianne Roland Michel, éminente historienne de l’art, sa famille a fondé un prix, désormais biennal pour aider à la publication de manuscrits qui s’inscrivent dans la suite de ses travaux. Le prix...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 9 Apr 2016

Page 1 of 212Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.