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Search Results for "Concord"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Concord found 185 posts

New Podcast Interviews

A couple of history conversations I’ve had this fall are available as podcasts for your critical listening.Matt Crawford at the Curious Man’s Podcast and I discussed The Road to Concord. Here’s the Apple link and a direct connection...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Nov 2019

The Road to Concord Leads on to Townsend

Tomorrow afternoon I’ll speak about The Road to Concord to the Townsend Historical Society.According to Ithamar B. Sawtelle’s History of the Town of Townsend, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (1878), in that town “The alarm to the minute-men...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Nov 2019

Lexington and Concord: A Case Study in Leadership and Direct Action

The British approach to its American colony in 1775 offers valuable lessons for historians and military professionals in the synthesis between the levels of... The post Lexington and Concord: A Case Study in Leadership and Direct Action appeared first...

Breen on “The Will of the People” in Concord, 30 Oct.

On Wednesday, 30 October, the Concord Museum will host T. H. Breen speaking on the topic of his latest book, The Will of the People. Here’s an extract from the book at LitHub:During the course of this evolving political crisis, a colonial rebellion...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Oct 2019

Stiefel on Cabinetmaker John Head in Concord, 19 Sept.

On Thursday, 19 September, the Concord Museum will host a discussion with Jay Robert Stiefel about “The Cabinetmaker’s Account,” on the life and work of joiner John Head (1688-1754). Head emigrated from Britain to America, and his Philadelphia...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Sep 2019

Minute Man Park Celebrates Its Sixtieth

Minute Man National Historical Park is celebrating the sixtieth year since its creation by act of Congress this month.This weekend there are a couple of recurring programs.Saturday, 14 September, 1:00-4:00 P.M.In the NewsWhat were local people talking...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Sep 2019

”A Procession that extended near a Mile and a half”

On rereading the Boston Gazette’s description of the Sons of Liberty 14 Aug 1769 dinner this year, I was struck by the detail that three times the men punctuated their toasts with “A Discharge of Cannon.” Perhaps only one cannon, but...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Aug 2019

This Week on Dispatches: Rick Atkinson on The British Are Coming

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews Pulitzer-prize winning author Rick Atkinson about his latest book, the best-selling The British are Coming: The War... The post This Week on Dispatches: Rick Atkinson on <i>The British...

When the “Powder Alarm” Came to Shrewsbury

Here’s a link to something else I didn’t realize was on the web: video of my Road to Concord presentation in Shrewsbury in January 2018. Chapter 2 of the book begins in that town:While Gen. Gage was arranging to remove the gunpowder from Charlestown,...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Aug 2019

Dr. Ezekiel Brown in the Concord Jail

Yesterday we found Ezekiel Brown back in his native town of Concord. He had left as a boy, his poor family seeking better farmland, and returned as a young man with enough skills and drive to set up a shop—only to be locked in jail for debt on the...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jun 2019

Ezekiel Brown in the Boston Jail

When the British army put Thomas Kettell and other provincial prisoners from the Battle of Bunker Hill into the Boston jail, one of the men they found there was Ezekiel Brown (1744-1824) of Concord.Robert Gross discusses Brown at length in The Minutemen...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jun 2019

Pvt. James Melvin’s Journal in Manuscript

The American Revolution Institute, part of the Anderson House museum and library of the Society of the Cincinnati, has acquired the manuscript journal of Pvt. James Melvin. Melvin was born in Concord in 1749, according to John Melvin of Charlestown and...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jun 2019

“Declaring Independence: Then & Now” in Concord, 2 June

The next session of the “Declaring Independence: Then & Now” public reading and discussion of the Declaration of Independence will take place on Sunday, 2 June, in Concord.“Declaring Independence: Then & Now” is a program...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 May 2019

Quebec Town Major William Dunbar: Captured, April 1775

In early 1775, the town major of Quebec decided to pay a visit to Gen. Thomas Gage in Boston. William Dunbar had been an... The post Quebec Town Major William Dunbar: Captured, April 1775 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Court-Martial of Captain Joel Pratt

On one Sunday morning in late April 1775, news arrived in Spencertown, New York, of the occurrences at Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts. This alarm... The post The Court-Martial of Captain Joel Pratt appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Two Prisoners of War Who Escaped

This series about redcoats in captivity after 19 Apr 1775 concentrated on the two men who gave depositions to provincial magistrates a few days after the battle. One of those men, Pvt. John Beaton, died in captivity and was buried in Concord. The other,...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 May 2019

Whatever Happened to James Marr?

As quoted yesterday, in 1835 the Revolutionary War veteran Thaddeus Blood told Ralph Waldo Emerson that he doubted the deposition published over the name of Pvt. John Bateman really came from that prisoner.Bateman, Blood said, was too badly injured on...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 May 2019

“Bateman, he thinks, could not have made the deposition”

When the Rev. William Gordon visited British prisoners of war in Concord in the spring of 1775, he reported that Pvt. John Bateman was “too ill to admit of my conversing with him.”Bateman didn’t get any better. In 1835 local historian...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 May 2019

“The prisoners at Concord in free conversation”

The Rev. William Gordon visited British prisoners in the Concord jail and wrote about it in the form of a letter dated 17 May 1775. Though from England, Gordon served a meeting in Roxbury and was a strong supporter of the Massachusetts cause. He happily...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 May 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.