The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Conflict & War"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Conflict & War found 66 posts

Why Newport, Rhode Island, Scorned the French

One would expect that a country that had been at war for five years would welcome its first ally with open arms. We might... The post Why Newport, Rhode Island, Scorned the French appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Siege of Fort Laurens, 1778–1779

During the American Revolution, British-allied Native Americans raided American homesteads and settlements all along the Ohio Valley. As the war progressed, the increased frequency... The post The Siege of Fort Laurens, 1778–1779 appeared first...

This Week on Dispatches: Eric Sterner on the Gdnadenhutten Massacre

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor Eric Sterner about the Gnadenhutten Massacre, the murder of ninety-six Delaware Indians—men, women, and children—at a... The post This Week on Dispatches:...

“The Americans Have Hoisted Their Standard of Liberty at Salem”

The skirmishes at Lexington and Concord are often considered the beginning of the American Revolution, a violent change in the controversy between Great Britain... The post “The Americans Have Hoisted Their Standard of Liberty at Salem” appeared...

James Moore’s Commission in the East Florida Rangers

Under the leadership of Royal Governor Patrick Tonyn, East Florida remained in the hands of the British Crown during the Imperial Crisis, not an... The post James Moore’s Commission in the East Florida Rangers appeared first on Journal of the American...

Top 5 Explosions of the Revolutionary War

During the era of the American Revolution, cannons did not fire exploding projectiles, so the image of explosions on the battlefield doesn’t apply. Mortars... The post Top 5 Explosions of the Revolutionary War appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Penobscot Expedition of 1779

For much of the Revolutionary War, the relative obscurity and isolation of the three Massachusetts counties of York, Cumberland, and Lincoln along the coast... The post The Penobscot Expedition of 1779 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

David Holmes, Timothy Barnard, and Questionable Loyalties

With the Revolutionary War in full swing by August 1776, George Galphin penned a letter to his nephew, Timothy Barnard. Galphin started his letter... The post David Holmes, Timothy Barnard, and Questionable Loyalties appeared first on Journal of the American...

To the End of the World: Cornwallis Pursues Morgan to the Catawba

As Daniel Morgan collected his prisoners on the morning of January 17, 1781, he knew Charles, Lord Cornwallis, could not be far behind. “The... The post To the End of the World: Cornwallis Pursues Morgan to the Catawba appeared first on Journal...

Operations of the Queen’s Rangers: Foraging in New Jersey, February–March 1778

“Of the forty or more battalions of Loyalists, which enlisted in the service of the Crown during the Revolutionary war, none has been so... The post Operations of the Queen’s Rangers: Foraging in New Jersey, February–March 1778 appeared...

Misadventures in the Countryside: Escape from a British Prison Ship

Thomas Painter inhaled sea water. As he struggled to recover from the “draft of Salt Water” that flooded his mouth and throat, he was... The post Misadventures in the Countryside: Escape from a British Prison Ship appeared first on Journal...

Gunpowder, the Bahamas, and the First Marine Killed in Action

In the summer of 1775, George Washington assumed command of the Continental Army outside Boston and immediately began the process of organizing his forces.... The post Gunpowder, the Bahamas, and the First Marine Killed in Action appeared first on Journal...

Delaware’s Colonel John Haslet (1727–1777)

Born in Straw Dungiven, County Londonderry in Ulster, Ireland,[1] thirty-year-old John Haslet was the young, widowed minister of Ballykelly Presbyterian Church. Arriving in America in... The post Delaware’s Colonel John Haslet (1727–1777)...

Revisiting B. E. Griffiths: Former Slave, Queen’s Ranger, and “Son of Africa”

In a recent article, Todd Braisted reconstructed the remarkable story of a black Loyalist soldier, “Trumpeter Barney” of the Queen’s Rangers.[1] Through meticulous archival... The post Revisiting B. E. Griffiths: Former Slave, Queen’s...

James McCubbin Lingan, an American Story

Of the thousands of men and women who contributed to the Patriot cause during the American Revolution, James McCubbin Lingan (1751–1812) stands out with... The post James McCubbin Lingan, an American Story appeared first on Journal of the American...

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By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

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For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.