The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Connecticut"

Showing 1 - 20 of 188

Your search for posts with tags containing Connecticut found 188 posts

“Tarr her all over from Head to Foot”

This investigation started earlier this week when Dr. Melissa Johnson tweeted a question on behalf of her students: “Were any women ever tarred and feathered?” I have Benjamin H. Irvin’s 2003 New England Quarterly article “Tar,...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Nov 2019

Seeking Refuge in the Valley

We finally broke free of Salem for the last weekend of Haunted Happenings—-in the nick of time! It’s just been such a busy month, but on Saturday we abandoned all of our responsibilities and drove west to the Connecticut River Valley to visit...
From: streets of salem on 28 Oct 2019

“Count Brown” of King William County, Virginia

In 1767, William Burnet Brown moved out of Massachusetts. He sold his father’s country house on Folly Hill, “Browne Hall,” to his cousin William Browne, by then one of Salem’s representatives on the Massachusetts General Court....
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Oct 2019

October

What was advertised in a colonial American n.”ewspaper 250 years ago today? Connecticut Journal (October 20, 1769). “Advertisements omitted, will be in our next.” In the late 1760s, the Connecticut Journal and New-Haven Post-Boy carried...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 20 Oct 2019

October 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Connecticut Journal (October 6, 1769). “Just Re-printed, and to be sold by T. & S. GREEN … The Connecticut Colony LAW-BOOK.” Compared to many other colonial...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Oct 2019

September 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Connecticut Journal (September 8, 1769). “A Negro Girl, between 2 and 3 Years of Age.” In the late 1760s, the Connecticut Journal, published in New Haven by Thomas Green...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Sep 2019

”Cheat them much as you can of ye Duties”

The Connecticut merchant Nathaniel Shaw, Jr., shipped a lot of molasses to merchants in New York and Philadelphia. Since there was very little sugar cane grown around New London, he was buying that commodity in the Caribbean—mostly from French and...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Aug 2019

“I am as Inocent of Destroying the Sloop as Either of you”

In 1933, the New London County Historical Society published the second volume of its collections, titled Connecticut’s Naval Office at New London During the War of the American Revolution. The Continental agent in that port was Nathaniel Shaw, Jr....
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Aug 2019

“Having made Seizure of a Sloop named the Sally”

As I’ve been relating, July of 1769 was not a good month for the royal Customs service in New England. On 19 July, a Newport mob had ruined the Customs patrol ship Liberty after threatening its captain and crew. The next day, with no armed...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Aug 2019

New London’s Liberty Riot

Newport, Rhode Island, wasn’t the only New England town that saw disturbances connected to the Customs sloop Liberty in July 1769. There was also violence in New London, Connecticut.In fact, the whole affair started with action off New London. Treasury...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Aug 2019

“They must be Sent directly, or by God, I should never See the Morning”

Last week I guessed that the Boston Chronicle’s 24 July 1769 account of Newport’s Liberty riot reflected the perspective of William Reid, commander of that sloop for the Customs Commissioners. It turns out we have Capt. Reid’s description...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Aug 2019

Wanted by Governor Wanton

The official Rhode Island response to the destruction of the Customs sloop Liberty in Newport harbor started even before the ship went up in flames.  A mob attacked the ship on 19 July. Two days later, this proclamation appeared, as printed in the...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Aug 2019

The Second Liberty Riot

I’ve been focused on events 250 years ago this week in Boston, but it’s time to look in on other events in New England.You may recall how in June 1768 the Customs office in Boston confiscated John Hancock’s sloop Liberty on charges of...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Aug 2019

A General’s Funeral: The Burial of Enoch Poor Revisted

In the May 30, 2016 issue of this Journal, Todd W. Braisted introduced us to General Enoch Poor of New Hampshire, his death, and... The post A General’s Funeral: The Burial of Enoch Poor Revisted appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

July 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Connecticut Journal (July 7, 1769). “Hugh Glassford … now carries on his Business, at Glen and Gregory’s.” Moving to a new location prompted Hugh Glassford,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Jul 2019

June 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? New-Hampshire Gazette (June 25, 1769). “He hereby offers, and assures a FREE PARDON.” In late May 1769 Major General Alexander Mackay issued a pardon to “Soldiers...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Jun 2019

Pvt. Simon Fobes: “fully resolved to go as far as my officers did”

Simon Fobes was a nineteen-year-old provincial soldier when he fought at the Battle of Bunker Hill. More than forty years later he moved to Ohio, and in 1835 one of his sons wrote down his recollections of the Revolution. That memoir was published in...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jun 2019

Fiasco: The Disastrous Raid on Montresor’s Island

By the evening of September 30, 1776, George Washington was, as he put it, “bereft of every peaceful moment.” During the previous month, his... The post Fiasco: The Disastrous Raid on Montresor’s Island appeared first on Journal of the...

“No Copies of the whole or any Part to be taken”

On 24 Mar 1773, as described yesterday, Thomas Cushing promised Benjamin Franklin that he and other Massachusetts Whig legislators wouldn’t make any copies of the letters Franklin had sent from London with his approval.Franklin had also specified...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Mar 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.