The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Connecticut"

Showing 1 - 20 of 200

Your search for posts with tags containing Connecticut found 200 posts

February 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The business of supplying them with papers.” William Stanton placed an advertisement in the February 12, 1770, edition of the Connecticut Courant to follow up on a...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Feb 2020

Mr. Shaw and Mr. Dumaresq

While Nathaniel Shaw, Jr., of New London, Connecticut, was speculating on the likelihood of war by buying gunpowder in the Caribbean in early 1775, as discussed here, he was still broadening his commercial network.In particular, he made a new contact...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Feb 2020

“Agree for the Powder to be brought Down to the Mole”

The start of the Revolutionary War changed New London merchant Nathaniel Shaw, Jr.’s business environment.For one thing, military supplies were much more valuable. On 25 Apr 1775 Shaw asked his connection in New York for “Five Hundred wt....
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Feb 2020

Trading for Gunpowder Just Before the War

Last year I wrote about the New London, Connecticut, merchant Nathaniel Shaw, Jr., and his many ways of evading Customs duties on molasses and other goods.Shaw’s experience moving molasses from the Caribbean to mainland North America was useful...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Feb 2020

January 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Any gentlemen … may depend upon being served as well as in Boston.” Cotton Murray, “Taylor from BOSTON,” inserted a brief advertisement in the January...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Jan 2020

The Fighting Ground “between the Enemy & the American force”

Asa Lord was born on 29 June 1760 in Saybrook, Connecticut. Around the time he turned sixteen, he signed up for a few months of military service, and he continued to do short-term stints as the war continued.Lord was eighteen years old in April 1779 when...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jan 2020

Raid on Isaac Hatfield’s House

As I described yesterday, in January 1780 Capts. Samuel Lockwood and Samuel Keeler of the Connecticut militia attacked the home of Isaac Hatfield, Jr., in Morrisania, New York. Hatfield (1748-1822) had been born in America to a substantial farming family...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jan 2020

Capt. Samuel Lockwood at War

Samuel Lockwood (1737–1807, gravestone shown here courtesy of Find a Grave) of Greenwich, Connecticut, became a second lieutenant in the Continental Army in April 1775.That fall, he joined Gen. Richard Montgomery’s invasion of Canada. On 5...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jan 2020

America’s First Vampire Investigators

The Connecticut Courant article I quoted yesterday named three men in addition to Isaac Johnson, the paterfamilias so distraught by tuberculosis in his family that he had two of his children’s bodies dug up in 1784. One was the man who wrote the...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jan 2020

A Double Exhumation in 1784 Connecticut

On 22 June 1784, the Connecticut Courant ran an article which has become highly significant for hunters of vampires and vampire lore. It read:WHEREAS of late years there has been advanced for a certainty, by a certain Quack Doctor, a foreigner, that a...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jan 2020

Vampire Reports in Colonial American Newspapers

The March 1732 issue of The Gentleman’s Magazine in London carried this news in its Foreign Advices section: “From Medreyga in Hungary, That certain dead Bodies called Vampyres, had kill’d several Persons by sucking out all their Blood.”...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Jan 2020

New England Vampires at S.H.E.A.R.

One of last year’s highlights was the annual conference of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic, conveniently in Cambridge. At that meeting the panel I enjoyed the most was one I didn’t highlight back here because its...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jan 2020

“Tarr her all over from Head to Foot”

This investigation started earlier this week when Dr. Melissa Johnson tweeted a question on behalf of her students: “Were any women ever tarred and feathered?” I have Benjamin H. Irvin’s 2003 New England Quarterly article “Tar,...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Nov 2019

Seeking Refuge in the Valley

We finally broke free of Salem for the last weekend of Haunted Happenings—-in the nick of time! It’s just been such a busy month, but on Saturday we abandoned all of our responsibilities and drove west to the Connecticut River Valley to visit...
From: streets of salem on 28 Oct 2019

“Count Brown” of King William County, Virginia

In 1767, William Burnet Brown moved out of Massachusetts. He sold his father’s country house on Folly Hill, “Browne Hall,” to his cousin William Browne, by then one of Salem’s representatives on the Massachusetts General Court....
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Oct 2019

October

What was advertised in a colonial American n.”ewspaper 250 years ago today? Connecticut Journal (October 20, 1769). “Advertisements omitted, will be in our next.” In the late 1760s, the Connecticut Journal and New-Haven Post-Boy carried...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 20 Oct 2019

October 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Connecticut Journal (October 6, 1769). “Just Re-printed, and to be sold by T. & S. GREEN … The Connecticut Colony LAW-BOOK.” Compared to many other colonial...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Oct 2019

September 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Connecticut Journal (September 8, 1769). “A Negro Girl, between 2 and 3 Years of Age.” In the late 1760s, the Connecticut Journal, published in New Haven by Thomas Green...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Sep 2019

”Cheat them much as you can of ye Duties”

The Connecticut merchant Nathaniel Shaw, Jr., shipped a lot of molasses to merchants in New York and Philadelphia. Since there was very little sugar cane grown around New London, he was buying that commodity in the Caribbean—mostly from French and...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Aug 2019

“I am as Inocent of Destroying the Sloop as Either of you”

In 1933, the New London County Historical Society published the second volume of its collections, titled Connecticut’s Naval Office at New London During the War of the American Revolution. The Continental agent in that port was Nathaniel Shaw, Jr....
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Aug 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.