The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Court Martial"

Your search for posts with tags containing Court Martial found 16 posts

This Week on Dispatches: Philip D. Weaver on the Court-Martial of New York Captain Joel Pratt

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor, independent researcher, and living historian Philip D. Weaver on the story of New York Captain... The post This Week on Dispatches: Philip D. Weaver on the Court-Martial...

The Court-Martial of Captain Joel Pratt

On one Sunday morning in late April 1775, news arrived in Spencertown, New York, of the occurrences at Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts. This alarm... The post The Court-Martial of Captain Joel Pratt appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Guilty of Desertion? James White, 7th (Royal Fusiliers) Regiment

In today’s trial, see if you agree with the court’s verdict and sentence. In determining guilt, the court considered several factors: was the man... The post Guilty of Desertion? James White, 7th (Royal Fusiliers) Regiment appeared first on...

Guilty of Desertion? Daniel Holliwell, 33rd Regiment of Foot

Desertion was a capital crime, but it was up to a general court martial, a board of thirteen officers, to determine the defendant’s guilt... The post Guilty of Desertion? Daniel Holliwell, 33rd Regiment of Foot appeared first on Journal of the American...

Guilty of Desertion? Hubert Römar, 22nd Regiment of Foot

If a British soldier was absent without leave, he might be charged with desertion; if caught, he could be tried by a general court... The post Guilty of Desertion? Hubert Römar, 22nd Regiment of Foot appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Guilty of Desertion? John Sullivan, 5th Regiment of Foot

In this second trial, see if you agree with the court’s verdict and sentence. In determining guilt, the officers of the general court martial... The post Guilty of Desertion? John Sullivan, 5th Regiment of Foot appeared first on Journal of the American...

Guilty of Desertion? Charles Hanley, 4th (King’s Own) Regiment

This week JAR Editor Don N. Hagist presents the testimony from five British desertion trials held during the American Revolution. For each trial, see... The post Guilty of Desertion? Charles Hanley, 4th (King’s Own) Regiment appeared first on Journal...

Women on Trial: British Soldiers’ Wives Tried by Court Martial

Wives of British soldiers were allowed to accompany their husbands overseas, much like spouses of military personnel often do today. Unlike modern militaries, however,... The post Women on Trial: British Soldiers’ Wives Tried by Court Martial appeared...

Halley’s third logbook

I said at the start of this Channel voyage that I wouldn’t be live-tweeting the logbook as I’d done for Halley’s two Atlantic voyages, as I felt the high proportion of technical data would be of little interest to the … Continue...
From: Halley's Log on 3 Oct 2015

Able seamen wanted!

When Halley’s first voyage ended prematurely with his return to England to court martial his lieutenant, he had to use all his diplomatic skills to persuade the Lords of the Admiralty to allow him a second attempt. That second voyage, however,...
From: Halley's Log on 14 Jun 2015

Lee’s Defeat… in Court

During the sweltering hot day of June 28, 1778, the Continental Army and the British Army fought the longest battle of the Revolutionary War at Monmouth Court House. Major General Charles Lee reluctantly agreed to lead the initial American effort, after...

Halley and his crew

Halley’s next letter to the Admiralty Secretary, Josiah Burchett, is dated 28 October 1699 from St Iago in the Cape Verde Islands – and it contains some very good news: (Halley to Burchett, dated 28 October 1699 from St Iago, … Continue...
From: Halley's Log on 28 Oct 2013

Harrison’s book

If you’ve been following this blog, you’ve probably guessed that I’m a great admirer of Edmond Halley and expect that I side with him in his difficulties with his lieutenant – yet when I first read about Edward Harrison and his...
From: Halley's Log on 10 Jul 2013

Harrison’s grudge

At the court martial held on the morning of 3 July 1699, we saw that Halley effectively lost his case against his lieutenant, Edward Harrison, and other officers, as the court declared them not guilty, issuing only a severe reprimand. Halley was none...
From: Halley's Log on 4 Jul 2013

At the court martial

On Monday morning, 3rd July 1699, the court martial to examine the complaint of Captain Edmond Halley against Lieutenant Edward Harrison and other officers of the Paramore is held on board HMS Swiftsure with Sir Cloudesley Shovell, Admiral of the Blue,...
From: Halley's Log on 3 Jul 2013

The Admiralty acts on Halley’s letter

When Josiah Burchett, Secretary to the Admiralty, received Halley’s letter of June 23, he referred it to the Lords of the Admiralty and then communicated their Lordships’ opinion to Sir Cloudesley Shovell, Admiral of the Blue: (Burchett to...
From: Halley's Log on 29 Jun 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.