The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Crime"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Crime found 517 posts

A Brief History of Crime Literature | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK.[1] Unless otherwise stated, all images are from books in my private collection. There are few subjects that interest us more generally, than the adventures of robbers and banditti. In...

Keeping Law and Order in the Liberty of the Savoy according to Joseph Ritson | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK. This article is taken from a conference paper due to be given tomorrow at the British Crime Historians’ Symposium, University of Leeds. Joseph Ritson (personal collection) Abstract...

Luke Hutton’s “Black Dogge of Newgate” (1596) | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK. Spanish Origins During the sixteenth century a new genre of popular literature arrived in England. Adapted from literature that was flourishing in Spain, a stream of printed books...

The Black Dog of Newgate (1596) | Luke Hutton

During the sixteenth century a new genre of popular literature arrived in England. Adapted from literature that was flourishing in Spain, a stream of cheaply printed books and pamphlets shined a light on the seedy underworld in England’s urban spaces....

A Reassessment of the Martyrdom of Regulator James Few

Many early histories of the War of Regulation, which culminated in the May 16, 1771 Battle of Alamance, paint a picture of a Regulator... The post A Reassessment of the Martyrdom of Regulator James Few appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Humours of May Fair (1760): or, Scenes of 18th-Century Life | Anonymous

 ‘The Humours of May Fair’ is an interesting poem, written at the middle of the eighteenth century, which depicts the scenes that could be seen at the annual May Day celebrations (so not a celebration held in Mayfair, London, but a fair held in the...

Innocent Florence Nightingale Tweet Provokes Social Media Anger | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. A Glance at My Book Collection My old, and somewhat tatty collection of bound volumes of the London Journal. One of my favourite things to do is to collect old books, and among my second-hand...

A Lay from the Trenches: A Poem of the Crimean War (1855) | P. J. Questel

‘A Lay from the Trenches’ was a poem, written in 1855, by a soldier serving in the Crimean War. It was first published in the London Journal and has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo.[1] We have the vigour yet, That nerv’d our sires of yore:...

William “Blood Bill” Cunningham and the Bloody Scout

On or about November 19, 1781, a Loyalist officer named William Cunningham and his regiment of approximately three hundred men rode toward Hayes Station,... The post William “Blood Bill” Cunningham and the Bloody Scout appeared first on Journal of...

A Canadian Tale of Horror | Anonymous

The identity of this story’s author remains unknown but it was originally published in Reynolds’s Miscellany on 27 August 1864.[1] It tells the story of the dangers that awaited itinerant pedlars in Canada while traversing the then colony’s lonelier...

This Week on Dispatches: Robert N. Fanelli on Cosmo Gordon of the Brigade of Guards

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews founding member of the Washington Crossing Revolutionary War Round Table and JAR contributor Robert N. Fanelli... The post This Week on Dispatches: Robert N. Fanelli on Cosmo Gordon of the Brigade...

Loyalist “Banditti” of Monmouth County, New Jersey: Jacob Fagan and Lewis Fenton

While brutal internecine warfare was waged in various sections of New Jersey, nowhere in the state were the effects both in length and degree... The post Loyalist “Banditti” of Monmouth County, New Jersey: Jacob Fagan and Lewis Fenton appeared first...

George W.M. Reynolds’s Italian Chartist Republic

By Stephen Basdeo George William MacArthur Reynolds (1814–79) was one of, if not the, biggest-selling novelist of the Victorian era. Born in Kent, he was originally destined for a career in the navy, which was the path followed by his father. Upon...

Authentic account of forgeries and frauds….

Uniform Title: Authentic account of forgeries and frauds of various kinds committed by Charles Price, otherwise Patch. Title: A new edition, being a more minute and particular account of that consummate adept in deception, Charles Price, otherwise Patch,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 1 Jun 2021

Tim Hitchcock and Robert Shoemaker’s “London Lives: Poverty, Crime, and the Making of a Modern City, 1690-1800” (2015)

Tim Hitchcock and Robert Shoemaker, London Lives: Poverty, Crime, and the Making of a Modern City, 1690-1800 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015) xvi, 461, £21.99 RRP ISBN 978-1-107-63994-2 Tim Hitchcock and Robert Shoemaker, two of crime...

Organized Crime

This article was written by Boone Alway, a sophomore undergraduate student at Richmond American International University (Leeds RIASA). It is adapted from an essay that he has recently written for Stephen Basdeo’s cultural and subcultural studies class....

“The Pixy; or the Unbaptised Child” by George W.M. Reynolds

Jessica Elizabeth Thomas George W. M. Reynolds wrote The Pixy, or the Unbaptised Child: A Story for Christmas, in 1848, and published it in his journal, Reynolds Miscellany, in 1850. It is one of Reynolds’s less well-known short stories, originally...

A Fatal Dispute Among the Guards

The British evacuation of Philadelphia had been under way for several days. Given the honor to be among the last units to leave, the... The post A Fatal Dispute Among the Guards appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Property Rites: How ‘modern’ is the story of Mary Ashford?

As a warning to female virtue, and a humbleMonument to female chastity,This stone marks the grave ofMARY ASHFORD,Who, in the 20th year of her age,Having incautiously repaired to aScene of amusement, without proper protection,Was brutally violated and...
From: Naomi Clifford on 27 Apr 2021

Owen Richards’s Lawsuits for Assault

When we left Owen Richards in May 1770, the magistrates of Boston were completely stymied in their inquiry into who had tarred and feathered him that month. Richards, a Customs officer who had also been part of the disputes that led up to the Liberty...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Apr 2021

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

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