The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Crime"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Crime found 491 posts

A Short Narrative “from the London Edition”?

On 16 July 1770, six days after the Boston town meeting reaffirmed its ban on selling copies of its Short Narrative of the Horrid Massacre locally, this advertisement appeared in the Boston Evening-Post:Next WEDNESDAY will be Published,[from the London...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Feb 2021

Thou Shalt Not Steal: Plunder, Theft, and Sticky Fingers

“The cunning man steals a horse, the wise man lets him alone.”[1] It had been less than three months since Congress had adopted a... The post Thou Shalt Not Steal: Plunder, Theft, and Sticky Fingers appeared first on Journal of the American...

Murder in Sanctuary: Liberty Jurisdictions and the Prosecution of Felony in Early Tudor England

Posted by Shannon McSheffrey, 19 January 2021. Figure 1: Timeline of Homicides in St Martin le Grand, 1508-17. Between 1508 and 1517, a string of six homicides occurred within the precinct of the collegiate church of St. Martin le Grand. Located...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 19 Jan 2021

January 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A POEM on the Execution of William Shaw.” True crime!  News of the murder of Edward East circulated widely in New England.  The Massachusetts Gazette and...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Jan 2021

Legal Trouble in Pembroke

Back on Thanksgiving, I mentioned that the Rev. Kilborn Whitman (1765-1835, shown here) delivered the holiday sermon in Quincy, Massachusetts, in 1798. I also noted that Whitman decided not to get involved in the Quincy Congregationalist meeting’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jan 2021

Press Coverage of the Owen Richards Riot

On 21 May 1770, Green and Russell’s Boston Post-Boy reported: Last Friday Night Owen Richards, one of the Tidesmen belonging to the Custom-House, was Tarred, Feathered and Carted thro’ the Town for several hours, for having as ’tis...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Dec 2020

“Found me in the Hold of the Vessel where I had hid”

As recounted yesterday, shortly after nine o’clock on the evening of 18 May 1770, a crowd seized Customs land waiter Owen Richards as he was returning to a schooner he had seized for smuggling that afternoon. The attackers ripped off Richards’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Dec 2020

“I also Seized the schooner, and her appertunances”

As recounted yesterday, on the afternoon of 18 May 1770, Customs service land waiters Owen Richards and John Woart spotted a schooner being unloaded on Greene’s Wharf. They went over to that ship, the Martin, and found Capt. Silvanus Higgins in...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Dec 2020

Watch “By her own consent”: Mary Ashford and Rape Culture in the Georgian Era

A chance to see the talk I delivered online for Vauxhall History and South Lambeth Library on 8 December 2020. I explore the story of Mary Ashford’s murder in 1817 and look at what it tells us about rape in the 18th and early 19th centuries. The...
From: Naomi Clifford on 14 Dec 2020

The Forgotten Trial for the Boston Massacre

On 12 Dec 1770, 250 years ago today, the third trial for the Boston Massacre began.This is the trial that later generations of Bostonians preferred to forget. In 1771 the Loyalist printer John Fleeming published a seven-page report including witness testimony...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Dec 2020

Convicted for the Boston Massacre

After Robert Treat Paine finished his closing argument in the second Boston Massacre trial on 5 Dec 1770, the justices delivered their charges to the jury.In modern trials, judges usually confine their remarks to clarifying points of law. In the eighteenth...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Dec 2020

Gin – definitely ‘mother’s ruin’ as far as Judith Defour was concerned.

Detail from Newton’s Samples of Sweethearts and Wives, via Lewis Walpole Library We all know about the eighteenth century gin craze: how men and women of ‘the lower orders’  got completely rat-arsed. As Hogarth put in his print...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 6 Dec 2020

The Prosecution’s Closing Argument

John Adams’s closing argument in the trial of soldiers for the Boston Massacre started on 3 Dec 1770 and lasted until the next day.Then Robert Treat Paine summed up for the prosecution, concluding on the morning of 5 December, 250 years ago today....
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Dec 2020

Jane Austen and a Hanging in Sydney by Susannah Fullerton

Inquiring readers, Susannah Fullerton lives in Australia, a land Down Under, which at this moment is experiencing spring, that blessed season. Recent articles on this blog have referred to her book, “Jane Austen & Crime,” first published...
From: Jane Austen's World on 29 Nov 2020

The First Day of Testimony Against the Soldiers

The first witness in the trial of Capt. Thomas Preston for the Boston Massacre was a barber’s apprentice named Edward Garrick. He testified about how Pvt. Hugh White conked him on the head for speaking rudely about a passing army captain. Edward’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Nov 2020

How the Albanian Mafia Infiltrated the Government

By Logan Lafferty Organized crime increasingly became a problem in Albania in the 1990s, after the fall of its communist government. Crimes like blackmailing, intimidation and racketeering were constantly increasing. The disintegration of the Eastern...

Samuel Plummer and His Father’s Sword

Here’s one more story from my foray up the coast from Boston to Gloucester.Dr. Samuel Plumer, the man who was keeping George Penn enslaved in 1770, had a son, also named Samuel. The younger man tended to spell his surname Plummer. Young Samuel Plummer...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Nov 2020

Whatever Happened to Jesse Saville?

On 7 Apr 1770, acting governor Thomas Hutchinson sent the Massachusetts General Court documents from Essex County justices of the peace describing the previous month’s mobbing of Jesse Saville. Hutchinson said Saville “had been most inhumanly...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Nov 2020

The Disappearance of George Penn

After George Penn sat on the Salem gallows for an hour and was whipped twenty times, as described yesterday, the authorities sent him back to the Essex County jail to finish another part of his sentence for rioting: two years’ imprisonment. At the...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Nov 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.