The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Crime/Law"

Your search for posts with tags containing Crime/Law found 13 posts

WHM18: Women’s heights in the Digital Panopticon

I’ve recently been working on the Digital Panopticon, a digital history project that has brought together (and created) massive amounts of data about British prisoners and convicts in the long 19th century, including several datasets which include...
From: Early Modern Notes on 17 Mar 2018

Defendants’ voices and silences in the Old Bailey courtroom, 1781-188

This is a version of the paper I gave at the Digital Panopticon launch conference at Liverpool in September 2017. In the interests of fostering reproducible research in the humanities, I’ve put all the data and R code underlying this paper online...
From: Early Modern Notes on 15 Sep 2017

Women Petitioners: London Servants

I’m going to round off WHM2017 with a couple of posts indulging my current interests in petitions. Today I have two petitions from the London Lives Petitions Project: both are from working women who petitioned London magistrates for help after their...
From: Early Modern Notes on 26 Mar 2017

‘she was soe stuborn that she would give me noe answer’

The many headed monster is running an online symposium on the Voices of the People (and see #voxpop2015 on Twitter) which is well worth your attention, and Anna Jenkin posted a number of responses on Twitter, musing on how the themes related to her research...
From: Early Modern Notes on 18 Jul 2015

Our Criminal Past special issue in Law, Crime and History journal

A very quick post to note that I have an article in this volume, based on my presentation at the first Our Criminal Past event in 2013. But there’s plenty more there for crime historians to be interested in.Filed under: Academic Work, Crime/Law,...
From: Early Modern Notes on 21 Mar 2015

New Year, Old Stuff, Revamped: things in progress

1. Meet the new project, which also happens to be just about my oldest project: Gender and Defamation in York 1660-1700 The core of this is research I did way back in 1999 for my MA dissertation. It was the first archival research for which I had the...
From: Early Modern Notes on 11 Jan 2015

Record Linkage: project workshop and work in progress

We’re holding an afternoon workshop on record/data linkage in Sheffield on 4 November. The aim is to explore the challenges and rewards of applying automated nominal record linkage to large-scale historical datasets, with all their variability,...
From: Early Modern Notes on 19 Oct 2014

Repost: Tyburn’s Martyrs

[Originally posted here, November 2007] The criminals went to the place of execution in the following order, Morgan, Webb, and Wolf, in the first cart; Moore in a mourning coach; Wareham and Burk in the second cart; Tilley, Green, and Howell in the third;...
From: Early Modern Notes on 20 Jun 2014

Repost: George’s choice: an 18th-century convict and a medical experiment

Originally posted here (February 2008) Last November, I dashed off a quick post about someone I’d encountered in an Ordinary’s Account: It’s Your Neck or Your Arm On the evening before execution, a respite of 14 days was brought for...
From: Early Modern Notes on 18 Jun 2014

Data And The Digital Panopticon

Originally posted on Criminal Historian: The view from my seat at the DP data visualisation workshop Yesterday, I went to All Souls College, Oxford, for a data visualisation workshop organised by the Digital Panopticon project. The project – a collaboration...
From: Early Modern Notes on 15 Apr 2014

History of Crime Blogs

Think of this as the “more hack, less yack” post. I’m putting together an aggregator for history of crime/justice/punishment blogging: The New Newgate Calendar I’ll do more later and add a form for people to submit more blogs and...
From: Early Modern Notes on 19 May 2013

Unclean, unclean! What historians can do about sharing our messy research data

A second follow up to my digital crime history talk with (hopefully) some more practical notes and resources. I’m as guilty as anyone of holding on to my old research data (databases, transcriptions, abstracts, calendars, etc of primary sources),...
From: Early Modern Notes on 18 May 2013

Bloody Code: reflecting on ten years of the Old Bailey Online and the digital futures of our criminal past

Talk given at Our Criminal Past: Digitisation, Social Media and Crime History Workshop, London Metropolitan Archives, 17 May 2013 My academic apprenticeship, in Aberystwyth, was spent engrossed in two things: first, early modern Welsh and northern English...
From: Early Modern Notes on 18 May 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.