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Search Results for "Crispus Attucks"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Crispus Attucks found 34 posts

A Call for the Cradle of Liberty

Having laid out the history of the name “Faneuil Hall” and my principles for changing historic memorials, I’m going to share my thoughts on whether to rename that building because of Peter Faneuil’s slave-dealing.First off, I think...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Sep 2020

The “Reflecting Attucks” Exhibit Expands Online

Some of the last historical events I attended in person were the Sestercentennial commemorations of the Boston Massacre at the Old South Meeting House and the Old State House—now Revolutionary Spaces.At the time, the Old State House museum was opening...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Aug 2020

“In like manner killed by two balls”

As discussed yesterday, there’s good evidence that Crispus Attucks was the first person shot at the Boston Massacre.There’s even stronger evidence that he was hit with two musket balls. The 12 Mar 1770 Boston Gazette reported that Attucks...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Apr 2020

Was Crispus Attucks Really the First Man Shot at the Massacre?

Another question about the Boston Massacre that I saw come up this Sestercentennial season is whether Crispus Attucks was really the first man to be killed in that event.Attucks is certainly remembered as the “First Martyr of Liberty,” as...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Apr 2020

“They all four were buried in one grave”

On the afternoon of Thursday, 8 Mar 1770—250 years ago today—Boston had a huge public funeral for the first four people to die after the Boston Massacre. This was only eleven days after the funeral for Christopher Seider, reportedly attended...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Mar 2020

EXTRA: After the Sestercentennial of the Massacre

And you thought the Sestercentennial commemoration of the Boston Massacre was over after the reenactments on Saturday. But no! Here are the events I know about in the coming month. Sunday, 8 March, 12:30-2:30 P.M. Faneuil Hall to the Granary Burying-Ground,...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Mar 2020

The Great 1770 Quiz Answers, Part 3

Here are answers from the start of the second part of the Great 1770 Quiz.VII. What were the real names of people in Boston behind these nicknames or pseudonyms used in 1770?A) DeterminatusB) The Irish Infant C) Michael Johnson D) PaoliE) PhilanthropF)...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Feb 2020

“David Bradley, came down with me to the corpses”

On 5 Mar 1770, eleven days after David Bradlee saw Ebenezer Richardson shooting out of his house, there was a confrontation between soldiers and civilians in King Street. That became, of course, the Boston Massacre.Among the people on the scene was Benjamin...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Nov 2019

“Speak Out!” at Old South, 27 Mar.

On Wednesday, 27 March, the Old South Meeting House will host the fifth annual “Speak Out!” commemoration of the annual Boston Massacre orations, co-sponsored by the Bostonian Society.The event description says:Each year from 1772 to 1775,...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Mar 2019

The Massacre, Black Lives, and Boys

Before departing this Massacre season, I want to call attention to Farah Peterson’s thought-provoking article in The American Scholar titled “Black Lives and the Boston Massacre.”Peterson, a law professor and legal historian at the University...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Mar 2019

Paul Revere’s Crispus Attucks as a Man of Color

People often say that Paul Revere’s print of the Boston Massacre leaves out Crispus Attucks.I’ve questioned that received wisdom, pointing to copies of the print in which a particular face in the lower left appears to be painted a shade darker...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Mar 2019

“Paul Revere’s Pictures of the Massacre” in Boston, 9 Mar.

On Saturday, 9 March, I’ll speak to the Daughters of the American Revolution, Paul Revere Chapter, about “Paul Revere’s Pictures of the Boston Massacre.”Here’s the description we came up with:Paul Revere’s engraving...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Mar 2019

Two Images of the Boston Massacre at Auction

The next Seth Kaller auction of manuscripts and printed Americana includes a print of Paul Revere’s engraving of the Boston Massacre. The auction is scheduled for 24 January, and the price estimate is up to $200,000. This is a second-state copy,...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jan 2019

The Survival of Crispus Attucks in American Memory

Black Perspectives, the blog of the African American Intellectual History Society, recently shared Stephen G. Hall’s interview with Mitch Kachun, author of First Martyr of Liberty: Crispus Attucks in American Memory.Here are some extracts from Kachun’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Jun 2018

Crispus Attucks: American Revolutionary Hero?

This post is a part of the “Race and Revolution” Series. By Mitch Kachun Crispus Attucks is a name that twenty-first century American schoolchildren usually learn in their introduction to the American Revolution and its heroes. Attucks—a...
From: Age of Revolutions on 5 Mar 2018

Colonial Comics “make history come alive in a potent time”

For the School Library Journal website, Johanna Draper Carlson reviewed the second volume of Colonial Comics: New England, focusing on the years 1750 to 1775. Carlson wrote:This anthology of 18 historical comic stories aims “to focus on the people...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Feb 2018

A Map of the Massacre to Explore

I mentioned this in a comment a few days back, but thought it deserved more space.The Boston Public Library’s Rare Books and Manuscripts department has just made a digitized image of its overhead view of the Boston Massacre, credited to Paul Revere,...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Mar 2017

Tom Feelings and Revolutionary Black History

I had the honor of meeting the artist Tom Feelings shortly before his death in 2003 when I drove him to a writers’ conference in New Hampshire. Feelings was then speaking about his monumental book of drawings depicting the transatlantic slave trade,...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Nov 2016

Wheatley and Attucks “Against All Odds” Advertisements

On his Black Quotidian website, Matt Delmont shares material from African-American newspapers—the news stories, opinion pieces, and advertisements that black Americans in larger cities were reading in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Earlier this...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Sep 2016

Hannigan on Crispus Attucks, 23 June

Tonight the Framingham Historical Society will hold its annual meeting, approving officers and a budget for the coming months.Then they’ll hear from John Hannigan, doctoral candidate in history at Brandeis University, about one of the town’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jun 2016

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