The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Cross"

Showing 1 - 20 of 157

Your search for posts with tags containing Cross found 157 posts

The Sign of the Gallows--Lucy at the Crossroads

It's been five years since A Death Along the River Fleet (2016) was released, but for Lucy Campion, only a few months of 1667 have passed in The Sign of the Gallows. ​Although the mystery in that last novel was of course concluded, there were...
From: Susanna Calkins, Author on 2 Feb 2021

Ranking American Revolution Films and Television

Given movies and television are the great American art form, the American Revolution has been poorly served by filmmakers. Though it was one of... The post Ranking American Revolution Films and Television appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The David Library of the American Revolution as It Was: JAR Contributors Remember

The end of 2019 marks the end of an era, when one of the world’s premier institutions for research on early America, The David... The post The David Library of the American Revolution as It Was: JAR Contributors Remember appeared first on Journal...

CALL FOR PAPERS: Medieval and Early Modern Studies Symposium ‘Sex and Gender Politics’

Venue: Northumbria University, NewcastleDate: 9 October 2019Keynote speaker: Dr Elena Woodacre (University of Winchester), author of The Queens Regnant of Navarre: succession, politics and partnership, 1274-1512, lead editor of the Routledge History of...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 9 Oct 2019

July 24

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Newport Mercury (July 24, 1769). “This valuable tincture … sold … at Mrs. CROSSWALL’S in Thames-street[,] Newport.” In the summer of 1769, Mr. Hamilton,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Jul 2019

The Ceasg, the Saltire and the Thistle – More Scottish Legends

In previous blog posts, we have featured a variety of creatures from Scottish folklore, as well as a couple of legends, such as the tale of King Robert the Bruce and the spider. Today’s post is about another mythological creature, along with the...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 18 Jun 2019

She-Pirates: Early Eighteenth-Century Fantasy and Reality

John Massey Wright, 1777–1866, British. Pirates (undated). Watercolor with graphite on medium, slightly textured, cream wove paper. Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection. In “The Tryals of Captain John Rackam and Other Pirates”...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 11 Jun 2019

One a penny, two a penny, hot cross buns!

Easter just wouldn’t be Easter without hot cross buns. These sweet, spiced buns were also popular throughout the Georgian era, known both as cross buns as well as hot cross buns, and traditionally eaten on Good Friday. The well-known song relating...
From: All Things Georgian on 18 Apr 2019

Jane Austen’s Sampler: Who Stitched It?

Inquiring readers, Brenda Cox has contributed yet another fascinating post about Jane Austen’s cross-stitched sampler. Is it hers or not? Find out as Ms. Cox explores the possibilities using an extensive amount of research and conversations with...
From: Jane Austen's World on 11 Apr 2019

Great Caesar’s Ghost

By Dr. John Langdon We have just reached that point where latest night bleeds into earliest morning.  A man paces restlessly in a tent in the middle of a military encampment, all his companions long since asleep.  The crucial battle looms ahead...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 23 Jan 2019

The Brazen Head and a Bridge in Newbury

An item one could buy at the Sign of the Brazen Head in 1759, but which Mary Jackson didn’t list in her advertising, was a lottery ticket. We know that from an ad that appeared in the Boston Evening-Post on 30 April:The Drawing of Newbury Lottery(the...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Jan 2019

Christmas Night, 1776: How Did They Cross?

When the two columns of the Continental Army slammed into Trenton at 8 a.m. on Thursday, December 26, surrounding and capturing most of the... The post Christmas Night, 1776: How Did They Cross? appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Page 1 of 8123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.