The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Culinary History"

Showing 1 - 20 of 63

Your search for posts with tags containing Culinary History found 63 posts

Cassava: From Toxic Tuber to Food Staple

By Christina Emery, Rachel Hirsch, and Melinda Susanto When eaten raw, cassava is likely to leave a bitter taste in one’s mouth. Worse still, the unprocessed plant, containing high levels of cyanide, is poisonous to humans and can paralyze when eaten....
From: The Recipes Project on 19 May 2022

One Hundred Delightful Tastes of Tofu: How Doable Was an Early Modern Japanese Recipe?

By Sora (Skye) Osuka Tofu Hyakuchin (豆腐百珍, One Hundred Delightful Tastes of Tofu Recipes), originally published in 1782, is often considered the first cookbook that only focuses on one ingredient and the beginning of the Hyakuchin-mono (百珍物,...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Apr 2022

Rice Bread in Sixteenth-Century Italy

By Lena Breda While scholars are broadening our understanding of food in early modern Italy, one curiously absent ingredient from such pictures is rice. Rice (or oryza sativa) is hypothesized to have been brought to Europe as early as 400 BCE [1], used...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 Apr 2022

Imperfect practice: a case for making early modern recipes badly

By Kate Owen I used to think “what’s the point of recipe making if you know you will not be making them with the diligence and expertise needed for practice based research?” Recreating early modern recipes is not part of my academic work and the...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Dec 2021

Cha (ឆា):The Remarkable Role of Stir-Fries in Khmer Gastronomy and Healing

By Ashley Thuthao Keng Dam Within the grand, yet nebulous universe of what food and culture writers deem as “Asian” cooking and gastronomy, there is a deep love and affinity for the stir-fry. In a hot oily pan, various combinations of vegetables and...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Nov 2021

Cassava: A Contested Good

Brandi Simpson Miller The widescale adoption of cassava in Ghana today has its roots in the nineteenth-century transition away from the slave trade to the “legitimate” trade in the palm oil that lubricated British industry. Cassava was introduced...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Aug 2021

Cherries Galore in a Cesspit

By Merit Hondelink As an archaeobotanist, an archaeologist specialised in studying plant remains found in archaeological excavations, I aim to reconstruct and interpret the relationships between humans and plants in the past. Archaeological plant remains,...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 May 2021

A Roman Vegetarian Substitute for Fish Sauce

By Edith Evans Roman cookery has been one of my research interests since the 1980s; I’ve accumulated a large repertoire of ancient recipes and usually do at least one live demonstration a year.  Most of the recipes include garum or liquamen – fish...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 May 2021

Say Ohm: Japanese Electric Bread and the Joy of Panko

By Nathan Hopson In 1998, the New York Times introduced readers to an exotic new ingredient described as “a light, airy variety [of breadcrumb] worlds away from the acrid, herb-flecked, additive-laden bread crumbs in the supermarket,”...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 May 2021

The Curing Chocolate of Antonio Colmenero de Ledesma of 1631

By R.A. Kashanipour “The number of people drink who chocolate is vast,” wrote the seventeenth century Spaniard, Antonio Colmenero de Ledesma, “not only in the Indies, where the beverage originated, but also in Spain, Italy and Flanders,...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Apr 2021

Grandma Sloan’s Houska

By Lina Perkins Wilder My family makes houska wrong. Hoska [sic] 2 cakes yeast ¼ c lukewarm water 1 c milk scalded ½ c sugar ¼ c shortening 2 t salt 4 ½-5 c sifted flour 2 T fennel seed 2 eggs ½ c raisins ½ c...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Mar 2021

Consuming History—Or Are We?

By Marie Pellissier  I’ve always been fascinated by the appeal of food in living history museums—the sound and aromas of someone cooking over an iron stove or open hearth never fails to draw visitors’ attention. Since I moved to...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Feb 2021

The Circus Origins of Pink Lemonade

By Betsy Golden Kellem Few things whip up an appetite quite like the playground of cotton candy, popcorn, fried food and sweet drinks that accompanies a circus. Pink lemonade in particular has long been associated with the circus, which does not simply...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Feb 2021

A Request for Memories or Recipes Related to Beans and Rice

By Heather Ariyeh Background Do you have a favorite memory or recipe related to beans and rice? Throughout the world, people have combined beans and rice to form popular dishes. Together, they form a complete protein, but perhaps even more interestingly...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Feb 2021

Memories of Akara and Acaraje

By Ozoz Sokoh Kitchen Butterfly & Feast Afrique Taste Memories To this day, wherever I am, Nigeria or anywhere else in the world, I have a specific Saturday morning taste memory of bread, ogi and Akara lodged in my head, and heart I daresay. I spent...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Feb 2021

Golden State: Recipes and Memory

Amanda Elise Herbert and Annette Elise Herbert How do recipes make memories, and how do we remember the methods, ingredients, and techniques that go into making a dish, a piece of technology, a work of art, a scientific method? Memory is a powerful force,...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Feb 2021

4. Meals on Wheels: The “Kitchen Cars” and American Recipes for the Postwar Japanese Diet

By Nathan Hopson From 1956 to 1960, the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) sponsored a fleet of food demonstration buses in Japan (“kitchen cars”) to improve national nutrition and fuel the nation’s economic recovery with more “modern”...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Dec 2020

Pulverized Food to Pulverize the Enemy!

By Nathan Hopson This is the third in a planned series of posts on nutrition science and government-sanctioned recipes in imperial Japan. Nukapan. Let me introduce our teatime specialty, rice bran fried in a pan. Mix wheat flour and rice bran, add a little...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Apr 2020

A Snapshot of the Food Studies Community

By Christian Reynolds From October to December 2019, the US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network ran a community survey asking what (and how) food scholars are currently using analogue and digital material. We were also interested how the community thought...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Mar 2020

Waste Not Want Not: Leftovers – the Afterlives of Early Modern Food

By Amanda E. Herbert As part of Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a $1.5 million Mellon initiative in collaborative research at the Folger Institute of the Folger Shakespeare Library, I’ll be working...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Feb 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.