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Search Results for "Dance"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Dance found 67 posts

The Dance of Death and the first printed skeleton

The earliest printed image of a human skeleton is this cartoonish image from a German block book from the 1450s. [i] It is one of a series of skeletons in the popular genre known as the danse macabre or dance of death. Art historian extraordinaire...
From: Anita Guerrini on 19 May 2020

The Winter’s Tale (Royal Ballet) @ The Royal Opera House (webstream)

While there is a long and proud history of dance adaptations of Shakespeare, Christopher Wheeldon’s retelling of The Winter’s Tale is apparently the first time this play has ever been rendered as ballet. It’s surprising,...
From: The Bardathon on 6 May 2020

March 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “[For more new Advertisements, see the Fourth Page.]” The first page of the March 8, 1770, edition of the Pennsylvania Gazette consisted almost entirely of the masthead...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Mar 2020

Patrons and Pirates: Publishing Dance in the Eighteenth Century

Today’s blog is a promotional one for ‘The Early Dance Circle Annual Lecture, 2020’  which will take place on Friday 28 February 2020 at 7.15 p.m. Swedenborg Hall, Swedenborg House, 20 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH Last year their...
From: All Things Georgian on 29 Jan 2020

La Beaumelle, écrivain engagé avant la lettre

Le quinzième tome de la « Correspondance générale de La Beaumelle », qui vient de paraître, se concentre sur la période de janvier 1764 à décembre 1766. Le 23 mars 1764 le mariage de La Beaumelle...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 5 Nov 2019

Matthew Bourne’s Romeo and Juliet (New Adventures) @ Sadler’s Wells/Nottingham Broadway

Illuminations’ new film of Matthew Bourne’s reimagining of Romeo and Juliet is a thrilling addition to the canon of dance adaptations of the play. Taking the classic Sergei Prokofiev score, but setting the ballet in a near-future ‘Verona...
From: The Bardathon on 23 Oct 2019

Remembering Garrick’s Jubilee in Stratford-upon-Avon

The statue of Shakespeare donated by David Garrick Imagine the scene in Stratford-upon-Avon on Saturday 9 September 1769, the morning after the night before, indeed after the three days of David Garrick’s Jubilee. There was an undignified rush to...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 10 Sep 2019

The Rules of Bath

Richard ‘Beau’ Nash, dandy, Bath’s Master of Ceremonies and unofficial ‘king’ of the city was born in 1674. He set the rules by which Bath society regulated their days, and established it as a resort of fashion. You had to...
From: All Things Georgian on 10 Sep 2019

Run neighbours, run, St. Al-ns is quadrilling it

“The Duchess of St. Albans, immensely fat, florid, and bejewelled, and a stout elderly naval officer wearing loose wide trousers, and apparently doing hornpipe steps, his hands on his hips, dance side by side with rollicking abandon. The others...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Jun 2019

Eighteen of the most favourite new country dances

An engraved sheet folded and mounted on wooden sticks secured with brass and bone hardware to form a fan, probably designed as a portable aide-memoire, includes musical scores for eighteen dances as well as directions for the dance steps — e.g.,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 31 May 2019

Launch Event for the Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Dance

We’d like to invite you to the launch of The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Dance (OUP, 2019) at Coventry University’s Centre for Dance Research on Wednesday 29th May from 2pm.Dr Jennifer Nevile will give the keynote paper, entitled ‘Ballet...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 29 May 2019

Programme du bal: 2019 RSA

It is my first time heading out to the annual Renaissance Society of America (RSA) conference, and I am very much looking forward to the intra-disciplinarity the event promises. Before I hop my flight from PDX Saturday morning, here’s my dance-card—perhaps...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 10 Mar 2019

Juliet & Romeo (Lost Dog) @ Nottingham Playhouse

What if Romeo and Juliet escaped the crypt together? Lost Dog’s dance production is not the first to explore this question, but perhaps offered one of the more innovative approaches to answering it. This two-person show (plus, at this performance...
From: The Bardathon on 26 Jan 2019

Guest post: The Early Dance Circle Annual Lecture

We are delighted to welcome The Early Dance Circle to the blog. On Friday 1st March they have their Annual Lecture, with this year’s guest speaker our good friend and fellow Pen and Sword author, Georgian Gentleman, Mike Rendell. So, to find out...
From: All Things Georgian on 22 Jan 2019

The wedding day

“The fat, moustached, Duchess of St. Albans and the slim Duke dance with vigour and agility, each poised on the left toe, arms interlaced, and hands meeting above their heads. From the Duchess’s small coronet rise giant ostrich feathers which...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 Oct 2018

October 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Supplement to the South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (October 11, 1768).“Many other useful articles, too tedious to mention.” John Edwards and Company advertised...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Oct 2018

MedRen 2018 Part 1

This is the first in a short series of posts about my trip to the Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference in Maynooth during July 2018. The Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference, known as MedRen, was a slightly scary undertaking for me. I’ve...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 24 Aug 2018

Third time lucky for the actress, Ann Street Barry (1733-1801)

Ann Street was born April 8th, 1733, the daughter of James Street, an eminent apothecary of Bath. Her brother William later became the mayor of Bath.  On March 17th, 1754 at Bedminster, Somerset Ann married the actor, William Dancer who, by all accounts...
From: All Things Georgian on 29 May 2018

Saratoga’s Scotsmen Fought for King George (Guest Blog by Saratoga National Historical Park, NY) BBC Civilisations Festival

    For the BBC Civilisations Festival we have some special guest posts. This one is written by Eric Schnitzer from Saratoga National Historical Park, Stillwater, NY. A correspondent…with the officers of the Highland regiments at present...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 5 Mar 2018

Dance and Feelings in Early Modern European Discourses

By Alessandro Arcangeli (University of Verona) While the practice of many different forms of dance was almost ubiquitous in early modern European society, the sort of treatment and comment it received in all kinds of sources varied significantly. To what...
From: Histories of Emotion on 28 Jul 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.