The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Dancing"

Showing 1 - 20 of 33

Your search for posts with tags containing Dancing found 33 posts

Waltzing

Six couples, some awkwardly matched, dance with varying skill in a ballroom.   Title: Waltzing [graphic]. Publication: [London] : Published by the proprietor, June 15, 1815. Catalog Record 815.06.16.01+ Acquired March 2020
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 26 Aug 2021

The Dance Will Go On!

There is no contest for me: my favorite Salem event has always been the Christmas Dance at Hamilton Hall: I have never missed it in all the years I’ve lived in Salem, even in the one year I had to go alone. Last year I was in terrible pain from...
From: streets of salem on 28 Nov 2020

October 7

What was advertised in a colonial America newspaper 250 years ago this week? “There is no other Art so various perhaps and universal in its Influence, as Music.” D. Propert and W. C. Hulett took very different approaches to promoting music...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Oct 2020

October 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “He proposes teaching COTILLONS in the newest taste.” The South Carolina Newspapers collection available via Accessible Archives is an invaluable resource for producing...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Oct 2020

September 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “PETER VIANY.  CONTINUES to teach Fencing and Dancing.” Peter Vianey taught dancing and fencing in New York in the late 1760s and early 1770s.  To attract...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Sep 2020

The Cally Family: Chester’s Early Modern Music Scene

This document details a rather formal conclusion to a brotherly quarrel. Dated 1599, it’s preserved as part of a manuscript “anthology” of copied and original documents from Chester’s administrative past by early antiquarian, Randle...
From: Middling Culture on 3 Aug 2020

September 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Pennsylvania Chronicle (September 18, 1769). “DANCING MASTER.” Advertisements in the September 18, 1769, edition of the Pennsylvania Chronicle reminded readers that...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Sep 2019

September 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? New-York Journal (September 7, 1769). “But few of them have yet had time to be perfected in their minuets.” During the first week of September 1769, Peter Vianey...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Sep 2019

Call for papers – Perspective Dancing no.2020 –

Dancing Maenad, marble relief, roman copy of the Augustan period (27 BCE – 14 CE) after a Greek original of 425-400 BCE attributed to Kallimachos. New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fletcher Fund, 1935, Inv. No. 35.11.3 © 2000–...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 10 Jul 2019

April 28

GUEST CURATOR: Patrick Waters What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-Hampshire Gazette (April 28, 1769). “A SCHOOL for teaching young MASTERS and MISSES, DANCING and GOOD MANNERS.” Peter Curtis took out...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Apr 2019

Historic Happenings in Salem

As always, I’m excited for the Salem Film Fest commencing this weekend and running through most of next week, but next weekend will see two big events inspired by Salem’s dynamic 18th-century history: the Resistance Ball at Hamilton Hall...
From: streets of salem on 29 Mar 2019

February 5

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? New-York Journal (February 2, 1769). “PETER VIANEY, Fencing and Dancing Master.” Peter Vianey’s advertisement that ran in the New-York Journal for four weeks...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 5 Feb 2019

Guest post: The Early Dance Circle Annual Lecture

We are delighted to welcome The Early Dance Circle to the blog. On Friday 1st March they have their Annual Lecture, with this year’s guest speaker our good friend and fellow Pen and Sword author, Georgian Gentleman, Mike Rendell. So, to find out...
From: All Things Georgian on 22 Jan 2019

1774 Christmas in Alexandria, Virginia

Nicholas Cresswell, 1750-1804 by an unidentified artist, c 1780.  Cresswell was the son of a landowner & sheep farmer in Edale, Derbyshire. At the age of 24, he sailed to the American colonies to visit a native of Edale who was then living...
From: 18th-century American Women on 7 Dec 2018

George & Martha Washington enjoying Dancing

Jean Leon Gerome Ferris, The Victory Ball, 1781, ca. 1929. This 20th-century depiction of Washington takes place after the Battle of Yorktown.What others wrote about George Washington dancing:“His Excellency (George Washington) and Mrs. Greene (wife...
From: 18th-century American Women on 11 Nov 2018

September 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Newport Mercury (September 26, 1768).“A Dancing-School is not for Diversion or Exercise only, but is designed to reform their Manners and Behaviour.” When fall arrived...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Sep 2018

September 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? New-York Journal (September 8, 1768).“He has been mistaken for a Dancing-Master, whose Behaviour to his Scholars gave just Offence.” Peter Vianey needed to do some...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Sep 2018

September 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (September 7, 1768).“THE subscriber WILL OPEN A SCHOOL FOR DANCING.” Compared to bustling cities like Boston, Charleston, New York, and Philadelphia,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Sep 2018

September 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? South-Carolina and American General Gazette (September 4, 1767).“PIKE’s DANCING SCHOOL.” Mr. Pike, a dancing and fencing instructor, was well known to the residents...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Sep 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.