The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Death"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Death found 495 posts

November 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A most celebrated Discourse on the Death of the Rev. and renown’d GEORGE WHITEFIELD.” The death of George Whitefield, one of the most prominent ministers associated...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Nov 2020

Van Horn on “The Power of Objects,” Plus a Panel on “Caribbean Connections”

Tonight, on Monday, 30 November, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host an online talk by Jennifer Van Horn on “The Power of Objects in 18th-Century British America.” The event description says: Over the course of the eighteenth century,...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Nov 2020

November 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Collection of HYMNS for social Worship … By that eminent and illustrious Servant of Christ, the late Rev. GEORGE WHITEFIELD.” In the weeks after George Whitefield’s...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Nov 2020

November 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A most celebrated Discourse on the Death of the Rev. and renown’d GEORGE WHITEFIELD.” George Whitefield, one of the most prominent ministers associated with the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Nov 2020

November 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “AN ELEGY on the Reverend GEORGE WHITEFIELD.” Following the death of George Whitefield, one of the most influential ministers associated with the eighteenth-century...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Nov 2020

October 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Sermon occasion’d by the sudden and much lamented Death of the Rev. GEORGE WHITEFIELD.” In the wake of George Whitefield’s death on September 30, 1770,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Oct 2020

October 24

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “THE two First PARTS of the LIFE of the late Rev. Mr. GEORGE WHITEFIELD.” News of George Whitefield’s death in Newburyport, Massachusetts, on September 30,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Oct 2020

A Memorial to a Mother

Jane Cave, later Jane Winscom (1752-1812), started writing poetry as a teen. Her first datable poem is about the death of the Rev. George Whitefield in September 1770.When the American War for Independence broke out and there was a general fast declared...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Oct 2020

October 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “An Elegiac Poem, On the Death of … GEORGE WHITEFIELD.” The Boston Massacre and the death of George Whitefield both occurred in 1770, separated by almost six...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Oct 2020

October 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Great Allowance to travelling Traders, &c.” Following the death of George Whitefield, one of the most prominent ministers associated with the eighteenth-century...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Oct 2020

October 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Character of … George Whitefield … worthy a place in every House.” By October 12, 1770, newspapers published in Boston and Salem, Massachusetts; Portsmouth,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Oct 2020

October 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “AN Elegiac POEM, on the Death of … GEORGE WHITEFIELD … By PHILLIS.” On October 11, 1770, coverage of George Whitefield’s death on September 30 continued...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Oct 2020

October 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Hymn composed by the Rev. Mr. WHITEFIELD, and intended to be sung over his Corps.” George Whitefield, one of the most influential ministers associated with the eighteenth-century...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Oct 2020

Peter Faneuil’s Disability and What It Might Mean

In my recent discussion of Peter Faneuil and the meeting hall still named after him, I referred to him as disabled. That produced some questions. So here’s more on what Faneuil’s contemporaries wrote about his body. On 3 Mar 1743, Benjamin...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Sep 2020

Eat, Drink & Be Merry

For the most part, I’ve managed to avoid dwelling on the pandemic and I must admit that I haven’t been that affected by it either, apart from the radical reconfiguration of my work environment! My struggle is to improve my online communication...
From: streets of salem on 21 Jul 2020

Jane Austen Appears in Vic’s Dream on the 203rd Anniversary of Her Death: A Surreal Journey in Photos

Inquiring readers: Today is the 203rd anniversary of Jane Austen’s death. She lived from December 16th, 1775 to July 18, 1817, and managed to achieve more in 41 years than a majority of us in twice that time. My previous posts marking this occasion...
From: Jane Austen's World on 18 Jul 2020

After-Death Revelations from the John Adams Papers

The letters from Abigail and John Adams that I’ve been quoting come of course from the Adams Papers project at the Massachusetts Historical Society.This week the project received printed copies of the twentieth and latest volume of the Papers of...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jul 2020

The Speakman Chronicles, or, That Escalated Quickly

Last month, I said I didn’t know whom Christian Barnes was referring to when she wrote in June 1770 about “a young gentleman who has formilly headed the mob in Boston and now resides” in Marlborough.I’ve since figured out who that...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jul 2020

Carts, Ships, and Trains: Abusing the Deodand

Posted by Sara M. Butler, 29 May 2020. On 28 Nov. 1313, chancery issued a royal mandate to the bishop of Ely requesting that he deliver a sum of £50 sterling to Nicholas du Vual, a merchant from Caen. The mandate was responding to a complaint lodged...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 29 May 2020

Bloodletting and Pleurisy

Writing in his autobiography Sir Simonds D’Ewes explains that on the 22 February 1631 his father, Paul Dewes a barrister and government official, ‘fell sick of a fever, joined with a pleurisy, of which disease he lingered three weeks before...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 27 May 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.