The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Democracy"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Democracy found 54 posts

How Eighteenth-Century Governments Worked | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and writer based in Leeds, United Kingdom, whose research interests include the popular literature of the period c.1750–c.1850. Introduction I recently had the pleasure of revisiting John W. Derry’s Politics...

On the Democracy of the United States and the Bourgeoisie of France (1838) | G. W. M. Reynolds

The following review of two works published in French, one by the famous Alexis de Tocqueville and the other by M. Michel Chevalier, was written in 1838 by G.W.M. Reynolds. La Democratie en Amerique. Par M. de Tocqueville. Lettres sur l’Amerique...

Battle Song of the Conspirators (1853) | James Bronterre O’Brien

The following poem was written by the radical James Bronterre O’Brien and published in place of the frontispiece in the bound volume of George Julian Harney’s short-lived magazine the Vanguard. Battle Song of the Conspirators for Equality ...

Delight in Freedom (1835) | Charles Cole

The following poem was written by Charles Cole and originally appeared in A Poetical Address to his Grace the Duke of Wellington (1835). It has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo. Albeit untaught to wake the lyre, Long as I feel the sacred fire...

Liberty, Equality, Fraternity (1875) | William Jones

This pro-democracy poem titled ‘Liberty, Equality, Fraternity’ was written by William Jones in 1875 and published in the socialist People’s Advocate newspaper. It has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo.[1] Come, liberty, with all thy charms,...

Monarchy vs Republic (1848) | François-Vincent Raspail

F. V. Raspail The following lines were written by the French physician François-Vincent Raspail (1794–1878) while he was imprisoned in Château de Vincennes because of his role in the French Revolution of 1848. Titled ‘Many Kinds of Monarchy—One...

Aristocratic Violence; or, The Peer who Punched Reynolds | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo While finalising my book, The Best-Selling Author of Victorian England: The Revolutionary Life of G.W.M. Reynolds (which has been co-edited/co-authored with my niece, Mya Driver), I’ve also been blogging about some of the...

“A Rascal … but rich”: Karl Marx and G. W. M. Reynolds | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. This post is a brief outline of an episode in G.W.M. Reynolds’s life from a forthcoming book titled: Victorian England’s Biggest-Selling Author: The Revolutionary Life of G.W.M. Reynolds...

A Call to the People (1850) | Anonymous

The following pro-democracy hymn was written by a writer known only as “Bandiera” and was published in the Red Republican magazine (29 June 1850 issue), edited by George Julian Harney. It has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo. People of England!...

Adapting Hegel: Helen Macfarlane’s Writings for the Democratic Review (1849) | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. This post—a précis of research undertaken by David Black—highlights how a young revolutionary woman in mid-Victorian Britain brought the teachings of Georg W.F. Hegel to England in the...

A Democratic Lyric (1850) | Tyrtaeus

The following pro-democracy poem was written by someone writing under the pseudonym of Tyrtaeus (in emulation of the ancient Spartan poet who, according to Encyclopaedia Britannica, stirring poetry on military themes during the 7th century B.C.). It was...

Degradation of Toil (1835) | Charles Cole

Charles Cole was one of the finest radical poets of the early nineteenth century. His poetry was often reprinted in the major democratic newspapers of the day, such as the Northern Star, the Chartist Circular, and even Reynolds’s Newspaper. ‘Degradation...

Once as the Oak: A Pro-Democracy Poem (1835) | Charles Cole

Charles Cole was one of the finest radical poets of the early nineteenth century. His poetry was often reprinted in the major democratic newspapers of the day, such as the Northern Star, the Chartist Circular, and even Reynolds’s Newspaper. ‘Once...

We Are Winning Now! (1839) | Anonymous

The following pro-democracy song appeared in Hugh Williams’s National Songs and Poetical Pieces (1839). The identity of the author is now lost to history but their work has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo for this Reynolds’s News and Miscellany....

My Heart is in the Battlefield | “W.”

The poem ‘My Heart is in the Battlefield’ by someone known only as “W,” was first written in November 1839. It was later published in Hugh Williams’s National Songs and Poetical Pieces (1839). The author’s identity remains a mystery but the...

The Glorious Fourth of July | Anonymous

The following poem, written in September 1849, was published in the left wing Democratic Review, edited by George Julian Harney.[1] The name of the author remains unknown and, for what it’s worth, I do not think that this writer aspired to be a “great”...

History of the British Aristocracy: Part One (1849) | Anonymous

The following first chapter in the history of the aristocracy, titled ‘The Aristocracy: Its Origin, Progress, and Decay’, was written anonymously by someone named “Alpha,” and was subsequently published in Reynolds’s Political Instructor in...

Cheer up! Cheer up! Ye Chartist Boys! | Anonymous

The following song was written in 1839 after the government’s rejection of the first Chartist petition, which would have seen the right to vote extended to all adult males regardless of their income. It first appeared in a short-lived newspaper called...

The Capitalist | “R”

This poem titled ‘The Capitalist’ was written by someone who signed himself “R,” and was first printed in George Julian Harney’s (pre-Marxist) socialist Red Republican magazine.[1] It is a poem that tells of the coming vengeance of the working...

A Song for the Democracy (1839) | H. Vincent

This poem, originally written by H. Vincent, was first published in 1839 in Hugh Williams’s National Songs and Poetical Pieces. Called ‘A Song for the Democracy’, radicals, particularly in the 1830s and 1840s, often used the definite article before...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.