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Your search for posts with tags containing Diary entries. Miscellaneous found 22 posts

On Board the Celebrity Beyond – bringing the 18th Century into a 21st Century Setting

Celebrity Beyond, photo by Didier Duforest This particular Georgian Gent has just got back from doing three consecutive cruises on board the Celebrity Beyond – a very modern state-of-the-art vessel which was launched last year. The stage in the theatre...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 12 Jan 2023

Daylight Saving – and the ingenious Dr Benjamin Franklin

Image courtesy of David Cohen, Unsplash To mark the fact that the clocks changed last night, a look at one of the ideas which triggered the whole question of daylight saving – a letter to the editor of The Journal of Paris dated 1784, from no less...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 28 Mar 2021

3 April 1789 – a day of thanksgiving for the recovery of His Majesty

Image of the King visiting St Paul’s, shown courtesy of the British Museum For four months towards the end of 1788 George III was incapacitated by illness – racked with pain and mental instability, the King’s conduct led to the first...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 23 Apr 2020

More Guinness please! Arthur Guinness (1725 – 1803) – a stout fellow if ever there was one.

This is the concluding part of my various blogs re-visiting some of my Irish-themed posts – a repeat of a post made seven years ago when I paid a visit to the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin: As a young boy at boarding school (yes, thanks for reminding...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 30 Sep 2019

Re-visiting Maria Cosway

Fake Or Fortune? Philip Mould and Fiona Bruce with the painting ‘Peniston Lamb II’, originally valued at £8,000 (Photo: Ben Fitzpatrick/BBC/PA Wire)   Last night the BBC aired the latest episode of ‘Fake or Fortune?’,...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 2 Aug 2019

31st December 1790 revisited – not a night to be out and about in Amsterdam.

To mark the end of the year, a snippet repeated from Richard’s diary for 1790: I have not come across a record of the disaster – although the century seems to have been marked by a number of catastrophic drownings in the canals around Amsterdam,...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 31 Dec 2018

Freedom at last! But not much else happening in the Hall household, May 1767.

Sometimes the diaries of my ancestor are interesting because of what he does not say – and in a way his diary from May 1767 is a case in point: basically, he only remembers to talk about two things, health and the weather. Two hundred and fifty...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 5 May 2017

A Spitalfields Journey … and a duet of museums.

One of the most extraordinary museums I have ever visited was the highly evocative house of Dennis Severs at 18 Folgate Street in London. Each room is unique, and reflects the fact that the 18th Century occupier of that particular room has just popped...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 9 May 2016

John Newton, Amazing Grace, and a letter from Olney dated 2 October 1775

Rev John Newton John Newton was the fascinating individual who we remember today as the composer of Amazing Grace – fascinating because he was at one  stage actively involved in the slave trade, but eventually recanted and became a church...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 15 Mar 2016

Going on holiday, 1773: Stone Henge, Wilton House – and more besides…

As the holiday season is upon us I thought I would look back to the events of 1773, and see what my ancestor was up to. Sure enough, he was just about to set off from London to go down to Salisbury, do a spot of sight-seeing (Wilton House, Stonehenge...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 29 Jun 2015

The Battle of Waterloo, its 200th Anniversary, and a New Angle on the Story

Today I am delighted to offer a guest blog-spot to author David Ebsworth, who brought out a fascinating book earlier this year entitled The Last Campaign of Marianne Tambour. Over to you David!   “They say that, on the day after the battle,...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 15 Apr 2015

Prinny’s Taylor – the story of Louis Bazalgette, tailor to George, Prince of Bling.

Louis Bazalgette There are times when I seem to be surrounded by members of the Bazalgette family: on Sunday evenings Edward Bazalgette is up there on my TV screen,with a credit as the director of Poldark; up until last year my pension was in the hands...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 18 Mar 2015

Another look at a visit to the waxworks, America’s first sculptor and a spy….

My ancestor’s diary entry recording a visit to Mrs Wright’s Waxworks in Chidley Court, Pall Mall. Mrs Wright was an interesting character, and one who played a part in the American War of Independence. She was born into a particularly strict...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 14 Mar 2015

Lady Skipwith – and a little money-lending never goes amiss!

I have always been intrigued by Lady Skipwith – not because she had her portrait painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds in May 1787, when she was 35. She had been born in 1752 as Selina Shirley and was the eldest daughter of the Honourable George Shirley, son...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 19 Jul 2014

An Indenture of Apprenticeship, 1734

My 5xGreat Grandfather Francis Hall was a hosier in Red Lyon Street, Southwark. His own apprenticeship (as a haberdasher) lasted seven years and he qualified in 1728. A few years later he appears to have taken on his own apprentice and I recently stumbled...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 27 May 2014

31st December 1790 – not a night to be out and about in Amsterdam.

To mark the end of the year  a snippet from Richard’s diary for 1790: I have not come across a record of the disaster – although the century seems to have been marked by a number of catastrophic drownings in the canals around Amsterdam, often...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 31 Dec 2013

Suspicious of new banknotes? Nothing new there, then.

The Bank of England recently proposed a consultation period for the introduction of banknotes made out of plastic, rather than paper. I am well aware that many countries have already discarded their rather nasty, crumpled, grubby, germ-ridden notes made...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 3 Nov 2013

1800: September 17th, riots on account of the dearness of corn and bread

In his diary the seventy-year-old Richard Hall writes: Small wonder that the rioters took to the streets when you consider just what a profound increase there had been in the cost of one of the staples of the British diet – a loaf of bread. Richard...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 18 Sep 2013

The Siege of Haarlem 1572-3 and “An Army of Judiths”

Once in a while I think it is a good idea to escape the confines of the Eighteenth Century (just not very often!) and with this in mind I have asked the author C J Underwood to do a guest blog, linking in to yesterday’s launch of her novel “An Army...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 5 Sep 2013

Master William Hall, a tearaway packed off to the country…

There is no escaping the fact: Richard’s eldest son William was a bit of a hooligan. As it happened he turned out O.K. in the long run, ending up as Master of the Worshipful Company of Haberdashers, but, as a youngster, he was by all accounts a...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 11 Jan 2013

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