The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Digital Humanities"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Digital Humanities found 424 posts

Corona Courses: My Top Ten Sources of Digital Content

So I have just finished converting my lecture courses into online formats: difficult to do midstream. A well-designed online course is a beautiful thing, but if a course is based on a more personal form of delivery and has to become virtual overnight...
From: streets of salem on 24 Mar 2020

Pass Ye Remote: A Quest for Early Modern Entertainment Through Online Learning Resources

Welcome to Elizabethan England via the digital world! We’re lucky to have a range of exciting and innovative online resources at our disposal that make it possible to explore the entertainment and cultural activities of early modern England through...
From: Before Shakespeare on 16 Mar 2020

Gillian Pink at the Voltaire Foundation: thirteen years and counting

As we approach the completion of the Œuvres complètes de Voltaire, I sat down with team co-ordinator Gillian Pink to find out more about how joining the editorial team led to becoming a researcher in her own right. Gillian Pink and Birgit...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 27 Feb 2020

Curating; or, building the manuscript inde

Back in early 2018, I composed a series of blog posts about getting started with turning a dissertation into a book, including researching the publishing process, targeting series, oft-circulated myths, and, in five parts, how to fund it. The, at the...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 9 Dec 2019

Modelling the Sonnet

This is the stub of a talk I’m giving on 13 November 2019. A full post will appear here soon. In the meantime, here’s a post I wrote on Machine Learning for Literary Critics in April 2017, and other posts in the category of sonnets.
From: Michael Ullyot on 13 Nov 2019

Winter School: Archival Research Skills and Book History, 2-3rd December, University of Limerick

The Centre for Early Modern Studies, Limerick, presents the 2nd Winter School in Archival Research Skills & Book History 2nd – 3rd December 2019 Supported by the AHSS Teaching Board   Venue: University of Limerick, Glucksman Library...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 12 Nov 2019

Welcome to #EMROCtranscribes 2019!

Good morning everyone from the University of Essex contingent! Welcome to EMROC’s fifth annual transcribathon. Pull up a chair. Pour yourself some tea. Tune in to our 2019 EMROCK Spotify list… And get ready to transcribe! Full details on...
From: emroc on 5 Nov 2019

The Way We Read Now: Criticism in the Age of EEBO

On November 5th, 2019, I’m giving a talk in the Renaissance Graduate Seminar at the University of Cambridge. Here’s my abstract: In 2010, Keith Thomas lamented in the LRB that computers were displacing the Oxford Method of historical ethnography,...
From: Michael Ullyot on 29 Oct 2019

Remember, remember, the fifth of November

Our 2019 transcribathon is coming soon… November 5! Flex those fingers, boot up your computer, and get ready to join in, because this is no ordinary transcribathon. We have lots of exciting activities planned to accompany our transcribing delights,...
From: emroc on 26 Oct 2019

Printed Elizabethan poetry now included in Union First Line Inde

As of September 2019, researchers have 35,261 more reasons to use the Union First Line Index of English Verse, hosted by the Folger Shakespeare Library. The database now contains all first lines, not just manuscript first lines, from Elizabethan poetry:...
From: The Collation on 17 Sep 2019

Code Makers: The Hidden Labour Behind the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Recipe Book Corpus

By Elisa Tersigni Last week, EMROC published a blog post called “Code Breakers,” describing the efforts of our Before “Farm to Table” project volunteers, who – like EMROC – transcribe our recipe books. This week’s...
From: emroc on 17 Sep 2019

Code Breakers: The Hidden Labour Behind the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Recipe Book Transcriptions

By Elisa Tersigni As many EMROC readers know, a major component of the Folger Shakespeare Library’s three-year, $1.5M Mellon-funded Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures (BFT) project is the digitizing, transcribing,...
From: emroc on 10 Sep 2019

Tracing the Aftermath of the American Revolution: An Interview on the Patriot Paths Protect

***** Today, digital humanities projects abound, and offer scholars and students new ways of understanding the past, present, and future. Charles A. Sherrill, the State Librarian and Archivist with the Tennessee State Library and Archives, headed up one...
From: Age of Revolutions on 12 Aug 2019

Oral History Jobs

Many cultural organizations and foundations hire historians to conduct historical research, analyze historical sources, present historical findings, and manage archival collections. The HistoryMakers, a non-profit organization based in Chicago, is currently...

New Italian Paleography Website

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library has created a new Italian paleography website and digital resource. This resource will be incredibly useful resource for advanced undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers in...

The Augmented Criticism Lab’s Sonnet Database

This is the text of a short paper I delivered at the Digital Humanities 2019 conference in Utrecht, the Netherlands on 12 July 2019. Or rather, it will be. For now it’s just filler text until I post this paper here. I hope you enjoy it: Lorem ipsum...
From: Michael Ullyot on 10 Jul 2019

Do You Teach DH? This Survey Is For You!

Brian Croxall and I are excited to announce the launch of a research study: “Who Teaches When We Teach Digital Humanities?” With this study, we hope to learn more about  the training and preparation of those who teach digital humanitiesthe...
From: Diane Jakacki on 10 Jul 2019

Exhibiting the Acadian History of Pointe Sainte-Anne

Stephanie Pettigrew [Welcome to our summer series on Acadian history! We are very excited to be presenting this special five- week series, cross-posting on Unwritten Histories, Borealia, and  Acadiensis, and in collaboration with the Fredericton...
From: Borealia on 9 Jul 2019

Posters at DH2019

I’ll be presenting two posters at DH2019: “Encoding the ‘Floating Gap’”: Linking Cultural Memory, Identity, and Complex Place” (with Katherine Faull, Bucknell University): In this poster the authors present a model...
From: Diane Jakacki on 4 Jul 2019

#DHSI19 Medieval + Early Modern Meetup

Here’s the slideshow for the #DHSI19 Medieval + Early Modern Meetup. This event connects researchers with each other, and with the solutions they need to move forward with their projects. It features ten scholars who each have two minutes to present...
From: Michael Ullyot on 13 Jun 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.