The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Digital Humanities"

Showing 1 - 20 of 439

Your search for posts with tags containing Digital Humanities found 439 posts

Exploring Voltaire’s letters: between close and distant readings

‘La lettre au fil du temps: philosophe.’ A stamp produced by the French post office in 1998 celebrates the art of letter-writing by depicting Voltaire writing letters with both hands. It’s true that Voltaire wrote a lot of letters –...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 20 Oct 2020

Conference Review – Thoughts on the 2020 digital Leeds IMC and the future of meetings and conferences in the age of COVID-19

In this blog post, Victoria Shirley of the Ceræ editorial board shares her impressions of the 2020 virtual Leeds IMC The 2020 Coronavirus Pandemic has upended the models of teaching students and exchanging research that we have used for decades....
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 16 Oct 2020

Literary Evidence in the Information Age

In Winter 2021, I’m teaching a graduate seminar in the Department of English (ENGL607.55) on “Literary Evidence in the Information Age.” Here’s the provisional description: In the 1980s, new historicists expanded literary critics’...
From: Michael Ullyot on 16 Sep 2020

Digitising Candide

Candide, title page of edition 299L (see OCV, vol.48, p.88). In what is arguably his most widely known work, Voltaire describes the extraordinary journey that his eponymous hero undertakes through geography and understanding, and for us digitising the...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 3 Sep 2020

Marketing Premodern Studies Beyond Academia

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library recently hosted an online seminar on Marketing Premodern Studies Beyond Academia. This seminar, organized by Christopher Fletcher (Newberry Library) and Lindsey Martin (Northwestern University)...

The Digitizing Enlightenment ‘twitterstorm’ of 3 August

This past week our publication partner, Liverpool University Press, shipped out copies of Digitizing Enlightenment: digital humanities and the transformation of eighteenth-century studies, edited by Simon Burrows and Glenn Roe, the July volume of Oxford...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 13 Aug 2020

Exposition virtuelle | Participez à la vie des académies d’art de province (ACA-RES)

Exposition virtuelle | Participez à la vie des académies d’art de province (ACA-RES) Participez à la vie des académies d’art… Portes ouvertes de 9 à 90 ans est l’exposition virtuelle du programme...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 2 Aug 2020

Digitizing the Enlightenment

As country after country has gone into COVID-19 lockdown, we have all had to learn to communicate, network, teach, study and relate online in ways unimaginable a few short years – or even months – ago. This phenomenon is just the latest stage...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 14 Jul 2020

Recreating Revolutionary Cities: An Interview with Serena Zabin

By Molly Nebiolo More and more academics have turned to digital humanities to interrogate early modern history, which has led to an influx of 3D modeling projects of early urban spaces. Serena Zabin’s video game, Witness to the Revolution, is one...
From: Age of Revolutions on 29 Jun 2020

A la portée de tout le monde

That was then: d’Holbach in print… When I came upon the baron d’Holbach in the early 1960s – my undergraduate senior thesis was on d’Holbach’s atheism and the response of Voltaire and others to the Système de...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 18 Jun 2020

Introducing Loyalist Migrations

Tim Compeau Loyalist Migrations is a collaboration between Huron University College’s Community History Centre, the United Empire Loyalist Association of Canada (UELAC), and Liz Sutherland at the Map and Data Centre at Western University. This will...
From: Borealia on 8 Jun 2020

Appel à contribution : Congrès de l’AGES – Catastrophes, menaces et risques naturels

Tandis que la notion de « risque » s’est trouvée au centre des réflexions sur la modernité et ses formes contemporaines (postmodernité, modernité réflexive…) – particulièrement...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 18 May 2020

Corona Courses: My Top Ten Sources of Digital Content

So I have just finished converting my lecture courses into online formats: difficult to do midstream. A well-designed online course is a beautiful thing, but if a course is based on a more personal form of delivery and has to become virtual overnight...
From: streets of salem on 24 Mar 2020

Pass Ye Remote: A Quest for Early Modern Entertainment Through Online Learning Resources

Welcome to Elizabethan England via the digital world! We’re lucky to have a range of exciting and innovative online resources at our disposal that make it possible to explore the entertainment and cultural activities of early modern England through...
From: Before Shakespeare on 16 Mar 2020

Gillian Pink at the Voltaire Foundation: thirteen years and counting

As we approach the completion of the Œuvres complètes de Voltaire, I sat down with team co-ordinator Gillian Pink to find out more about how joining the editorial team led to becoming a researcher in her own right. Gillian Pink and Birgit...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 27 Feb 2020

Curating; or, building the manuscript inde

Back in early 2018, I composed a series of blog posts about getting started with turning a dissertation into a book, including researching the publishing process, targeting series, oft-circulated myths, and, in five parts, how to fund it. The, at the...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 9 Dec 2019

Modelling the Sonnet

This is the stub of a talk I’m giving on 13 November 2019. A full post will appear here soon. In the meantime, here’s a post I wrote on Machine Learning for Literary Critics in April 2017, and other posts in the category of sonnets.
From: Michael Ullyot on 13 Nov 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.