The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Diplomacy"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Diplomacy found 104 posts

This Week on Dispatches: Richard J. Werner on King Gustav III of Sweden Recognizing the United States

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews researcher and JAR contributor Richard J. Werther on King Gustav III of Sweden’s recognition of an... The post This Week on Dispatches: Richard J. Werner on King Gustav III of Sweden...

King Gustav III of Sweden: Friendly Foe of the United States

New York City, November 16, 1783. It was finally here, Evacuation Day. The British, who had occupied Manhattan for seven long years, were finally... The post King Gustav III of Sweden: Friendly Foe of the United States appeared first on Journal of the...

Friendship and Sociability: A Reexamination of Benjamin Franklin’s Friendship with Madame Brillon de Jouy

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Kelsa Pellettiere For generations, Benjamin...
From: Age of Revolutions on 12 Jan 2021

Abigail Adams’s Quiet Thanksgiving in 1798

On 29 Nov 1798, Abigail Adams sat down to an unusually small Thanksgiving dinner. An autumn Thanksgiving feast was an important tradition in New England, and in October Massachusetts’s governor, Increase Sumner, issued a proclamation naming the...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Nov 2020

“The Solicitation and Expectation of such Reward”

I left William Story on his way to London in late 1771 bearing letters of reference from three major political players in Boston—from royal governor Thomas Hutchinson, speaker of the house Thomas Cushing, and house clerk Samuel Adams.Hutchinson...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Oct 2020

Clarifying Beaumarchais

At the dawn of the American Revolution, France and Britain had been coexisting under a treaty of friendship since about 1765. Traded like properties... The post Clarifying Beaumarchais appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Voltaire and Choiseul: the ever-evolving French diplomacy of 1759-176

Louis XV, by Maurice-Quentin de La Tour (1748). In May 1759 king Frederick II of Prussia sent Voltaire a poem disdaining the French king Louis XV (see Mémoires pour servir à la vie de Monsieur de Voltaire, OCV, vol.45C, p.439) and insulting...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 20 Aug 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Kim Burdick on the Atlantic Crossing of the French l’Expédition Particulière

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews historian and JAR contributor Kim Burdick about l’Expédition Particulière, the codename for the French fleet that sailed from... The post This Week on Dispatches:...

News from France and “the language of patriotism”

Boston’s Civic Festival to honor the new republic of France on 24 Jan 1793 came at an unusual cultural and political moment. The latest news from Europe relayed the events of late 1792. Bostonians knew about how the French assembly had deposed Louis...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jul 2020

Citizens at Boston’s Civic Festival of 1793

I’m jumping around among multiple series here [whatever happened to the Saga of the Brazen Head?], but there’s no better date than 14 July to return to Boston’s celebration of republican France in 1793.At the start of the month I quoted...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Jul 2020

Opposing the Franco-American Alliance: The Case of Anne-Robert Jacques Turgot

The participation of the French on the side of the newly declared independent American colonies is widely acknowledged as the factor that tipped the... The post Opposing the Franco-American Alliance: The Case of Anne-Robert Jacques Turgot appeared first...

Revolutionary Revenge on Hudson Bay, 178

French naval officer La Pérouse (Jean Francois de Galaup, Comte de la Pérouse) was one of many who actively supported the American Patriots in... The post Revolutionary Revenge on Hudson Bay, 1782 appeared first on Journal of the American...

Hutchinson and Adams, Together at Last

Both men would hate that I’m making a combined announcement, but new volumes of the Papers of Thomas Hutchinson and the Papers of John Adams have just been published. The Colonial Society of Massachusetts is publishing the Thomas Hutchinson Papers,...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 May 2020

Scouting the American Revolution: The French Intelligence Community

We often hear about intelligence activities which take place during times of war. Having good intelligence is indeed critical to military and diplomatic success.... The post Scouting the American Revolution: The French Intelligence Community appeared...

An Economist’s Solution to the War: Adam Smith and the Rebelling Colonies

Adam Smith, considered by many to be the Father of Modern Economics, was born in Kirkcaldy, Scotland, on June 16, 1723. His father, also... The post An Economist’s Solution to the War: Adam Smith and the Rebelling Colonies appeared first on Journal...

“Natives at the Siege” talk in Cambridge, 12 Mar.

On Thursday, 12 March, I’ll speak at the Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site in Cambridge on the topic of “Native Americans at the Siege of Boston.”This is the latest of the annual talks I’ve...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Feb 2020

France and Spain Invade England—Almost

On February 6, 1778, France signed two treaties with the United States, one of Amity and Commerce, the other, a defensive Alliance.[1] In them, France... The post France and Spain Invade England—Almost appeared first on Journal of the American...

Why Newport, Rhode Island, Scorned the French

One would expect that a country that had been at war for five years would welcome its first ally with open arms. We might... The post Why Newport, Rhode Island, Scorned the French appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“Where BOSTONIA lifts her spires”

It’s a Boston 1775 tradition to share a “carrier verse” at the turn of the year. Traditionally those were poems written and printed by newspaper apprentices as a way to cadge tips from their customers. Often those apprentices commented...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Jan 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.