The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Distillation"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Distillation found 54 posts

Report from Parnassus

 Rafael - El Parnaso (Vatican, Rome, 1511)Apollo on Parnassus, (fresco detail). In the spring of 1612, Italian glassmaker Antonio Neri finished writing L’Arte Vetraria, and the Holy Office of the Inquisition approved it for publication....
From: Conciatore on 27 Nov 2020

Distilling Women

Distillation became an important household activity for many women in early modern Europe in the seventeenth century; we have ample evidence that they wrote, purchased, collected, annotated, and shared recipes for medicinal, hygienic, and sweet-smelling...
From: streets of salem on 17 Oct 2020

Renaissance Lapidaries

 Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, 1598-1600f. 7v, "Ars Preparatio Lapidum"In 1598, in his early twenties, before his glassmaking career began, Antonio Neri completed an extraordinary manuscript. Tesoro del Mondo or 'Treasure of the World'...
From: Conciatore on 25 Sep 2020

Recipes for the Inner Chamber: Vernacular Manufacturing in Early 20th Century China

By Eugenia Lean In the 1910s, a curious print culture phenomenon appeared in China’s urban areas.  Journals such as the Ladies’ Journal (Funü zazhi) and Women’s World (Nüzi shijie) began to run columns and articles that...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Mar 2020

Report from Parnassus

Rafael - El Parnaso (Vatican, Rome, 1511)Apollo on Parnassus, (fresco detail). In the spring of 1612, Italian glassmaker Antonio Neri finished writing L’Arte Vetraria, and the Holy Office of the Inquisition approved it for publication....
From: Conciatore on 6 Jan 2020

Early Modern Lapidaries

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, 1598-1600f. 7v, "Ars Preparatio Lapidum"In 1598, in his early twenties, before his glassmaking career began, Antonio Neri completed an extraordinary manuscript. Tesoro del Mondo or 'Treasure of the World' was...
From: Conciatore on 8 May 2019

Report from Parnassus

Rafael - El Parnaso (Vatican, Rome, 1511)Apollo on Parnassus, (fresco detail). In the spring of 1612, Italian glassmaker Antonio Neri finished writing L’Arte Vetraria, and the Holy Office of the Inquisition approved it for publication....
From: Conciatore on 1 May 2019

‘Used With Constant Success’: Animal Ingredients in Eighteenth-Century Remedies, and their Success in the Beauty Industry

It’s Halloween, so it’s fitting that I’m writing about slimes and sticky oozes, though somewhat misleading. This post considers three common animal-derived medicinal ingredients found in eighteenth-century recipes. Earlier this week,...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Oct 2018

The “Gentle Heat” of Boerhaave’s Little Furnace

By Ruben Verwaal and Marieke Hendriksen Ruben Verwaal is curator of the historical collections at Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, and at the Museum for Communication in The Hague. He obtained his PhD in June 2018 with a thesis on the role of bodily...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Aug 2018

Tales From the Archives: A Recipe for Disaster: How Not to Distill Turpentine

In September 2018, The Recipes Project will be six years old. There’s been a lot of blogging on this platform, and we are so grateful to all our wonderful contributors. But with so much material on the site, it’s easy for earlier...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Aug 2018

Recipes for honey-drinks in the first published English beekeeping manual

By Matthew Phillpott The Roman emperor Augustus is said to have asked the Roman orator, poet, and politician, Publius Vedius Pollio, how to live a long life. Pollio answered that ‘applying the Muse water within, and anointing oil without the body’...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Jul 2018

Reniassance Lapidaries

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, 1598-1600f. 7v, "Ars Preparatio Lapidum"In 1598, in his early twenties, before his glassmaking career began, Antonio Neri completed an extraordinary manuscript. Tesoro del Mondo or 'Treasure of the World' was...
From: Conciatore on 18 Jul 2018

Reports from Parnassus

Rafael - El Parnaso (Vatican, Rome, 1511)Apollo on Parnassus, (fresco detail). In the spring of 1612, Italian glassmaker Antonio Neri finished writing L’Arte Vetraria, and the Holy Office of the Inquisition approved it for publication....
From: Conciatore on 20 Jun 2018

A review and expansion upon “Holy Alchemists, metallurgists and pharmacists: The material evidence for British Monastic Chemistry”

On twitter recently a new article with the above self explanatory title was mentioned, written by Christopher Booth and published in The Journal of medieval Monastic studies, Volume 6, 2017. The starting point for his paper is the venerable but still...
From: distillatio on 27 Mar 2018

Tales from the Archives: DISTILLING THE ESSENCE OF HEAVEN: HOW ALCOHOL COULD DEFEAT THE ANTICHRIST

In September 2016, The Recipes Project celebrated its fourth birthday. We now have over 500 posts in our archives and over 120 pages for readers to sift through. That’s a lot of material! (And thank you so much to our contributors for...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Jan 2018

Lapidaries in 1698

Antonio Neri, Tesoro del Mondo, 1598-1600 f. 7v, "Ars Preparatio Lapidum" In 1598, in his early twenties, before his glassmaking career began, Antonio Neri completed an extraordinary manuscript. Tesoro del Mondo or 'Treasure of the World'...
From: Conciatore on 28 Aug 2017

‘This one is good’: Recipes, Testing and Lay Practitioners in Early German Print

By Tillmann Taape Having recently finished my doctoral thesis on the printed works of Hieronymus Brunschwig, which have previously featured on the Recipes Blog (here and here), I am delighted to contribute to this series of posts on testing and trying...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Aug 2017

Reports From Parnassus

Rafael - El Parnaso (Vatican, Rome, 1511) Apollo on Parnassus, (fresco detail).  In the spring of 1612, Italian glassmaker Antonio Neri finished writing L’Arte Vetraria, and the Holy Office of the Inquisition approved it for publication....
From: Conciatore on 21 Jul 2017

The use of distilled medicine in England in the early 15th century

Twitter is useful for finding out what others are researching. This is a good example: https://recipes.hypotheses.org/9489 A blog post from the useful and interesting Recipes project. It discusses a book called Tabula Medicine, which has various distillation...
From: distillatio on 22 Jun 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.