The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Dorchester"

Showing 1 - 20 of 39

Your search for posts with tags containing Dorchester found 39 posts

“Lodged in part pay for the said Cannon”

In September and October 1774, as I describe in The Road to Concord, Gen. Thomas Gage’s royal government and the Patriots in and around Boston engaged in an “arms race”: racing to grab every cannon and mortar they could. The Crown took...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jan 2021

A Juror’s Notes on the Boston Massacre Trial

Edward Pierce (1735-1818) was a carpenter, farmer, and deacon in Dorchester. He came from the family that built and expanded the Pierce House, erected around 1683 and thus one of the oldest surviving structures in the state. The Dorchester Antiquarian...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Dec 2020

Finding Jurors for the Boston Massacre Trial

On 27 Nov 1770, 250 years ago today, the second trial for the Boston Massacre got under way. It was supposed to start a week earlier, but the court had trouble finding twelve jurors who were ready to sit on what promised to be an unusually long, unusually...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Nov 2020

David Bradlee: “Windows broke when I got there”

We’ve come to the last of the men George Gailer sued for tarring and feathering him in October 1769, the man his legal filing identified as a “Taylor” named “David Bradley.” As it happens, David Bradlee was one of the first...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Nov 2019

”A Procession that extended near a Mile and a half”

On rereading the Boston Gazette’s description of the Sons of Liberty 14 Aug 1769 dinner this year, I was struck by the detail that three times the men punctuated their toasts with “A Discharge of Cannon.” Perhaps only one cannon, but...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Aug 2019

Dinner at the Sign of Liberty Tree

On 14 Aug 1769, 250 years ago today, Boston’s Sons of Liberty gathered to celebrate the anniversary of the first public protest against the Stamp Act, four years earlier.Of course, they were also celebrating what they saw as their triumph over Gov....
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Aug 2019

“The more I think of our Enemies quitting Boston…”

Here’s how Abigail Adams experienced the British evacuation of Boston on 17 Mar 1776. She was at the family home in Braintree, writing to her husband John in Philadelphia. (And she had a cold, but I’m skipping that.)I find the fireing was...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Mar 2019

“His Excellency is apprehensive”

On 16 Mar 1776, the British military still hadn’t evacuated Boston.To be fair, that wasn’t for lack of trying. The previous day, Capt. John Barker wrote in his journal:The Wind being fair at 12 oclock in the day, the Troops were order’d...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Mar 2019

“He ordered powder casks to be filled with sand”

Here’s one last story of gunpowder and sand supposedly getting mixed up during the siege of Boston. It comes from the recollections of William H. Sumner (shown here), who wasn’t even born until 1780. He later became adjutant general of the...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Dec 2018

October 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (October 4, 1768).“A proper supply of GOODS will be sent to their stores at DORCHESTER and MONCK’S CORNER.” For six...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Oct 2018

The Dorchester Heights Memorial, South Boston, and the Celebration of Evacuation Day

On my way to Boston’s Logan Airport a while ago a taxi driver pointed towards Boston Harbor and started telling me about a Revolutionary... The post The Dorchester Heights Memorial, South Boston, and the Celebration of Evacuation Day appeared first...

“Dorchester Hill would be a very important Post”

On 25 Aug 1775, Gen. Artemas Ward wrote from his “Camp at Roxbury” to the man who had replaced him at the head of the army besieging Boston, Gen. George Washington:Sir.The Relations of Several Persons last out of Boston all tending to confirm...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Aug 2018

Men Who Brought Us Dorchester Heights

On 5 Mar 1776, Gen. William Howe and his colleagues in the British military woke up to find Continental troops positioned and protected on the heights of the Dorchester peninsula. The cannon up there threatened not only Boston, already under artillery...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Mar 2018

“Throw up such works on the two commanding Eminences”

I’ve often wondered how Gen. Artemas Ward reacted to the letters he received from the headquarters of his commander, Gen. George Washington, on 2-3 Mar 1776. Those letters were full of details about how to manage the Continental Army’s move...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Mar 2018

“Dangerous to delay taking Post on Dorchester Hills”

On 3 Mar 1776, Gen. George Washington followed up his short note to Gen. Artemas Ward (quoted yesterday) with a full set of orders for moving onto the Dorchester peninsula on the evening of the 4th.My Letter of last Night would inform you that the Genl...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Mar 2018

Washington’s “Early notice” to Ward

On 2 Mar 1776, Gen. George Washington wrote a short note from Cambridge to his second-in-command, Gen. Artemas Ward:After weighing all Circumstances of Tide, &c., and considering the hazard of having the Posts on Dorchester Neck taken by the Enemy,...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Mar 2018

Reconnoitering the Dorchester Peninsula with the Generals

As I discussed yesterday, in early February 1776 Gen. George Washington and his engineers were discussing whether it was feasible to move onto the Dorchester peninsula and mount cannon there to threaten British shipping. On 12 February, the commander-in-chief...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Feb 2018

Rufus Putnam Lays Out “so Costly a work”

On 11 Feb 1776, Lt. Col. Rufus Putnam of the Continental Army wrote to his commander-in-chief about what would be necessary to fortify the heights of the Dorchester peninsula.With the ground frozen, soldiers would need extra time to dig in. That in turn...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Feb 2018

“Revolutionary War National Parks” Panel in Lexington, 7 June

On Wednesday, 7 June, I’ll be part of a panel discussion in Lexington on “Revolutionary War National Parks: Treasures Worth Protecting in Massachusetts.” This event is co-sponsored by the National Parks Conservation Association, the...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jun 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.