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Search Results for "Duke of Monmouth"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Duke of Monmouth found 32 posts

The Lost Case for Murder: A Guest Post by Stephen M. Carter

The Lost Case for Murder, 6 February 1685 by Stephen M. Carter In today’s social media-filled world, conspiracy theories and fake news spread like a wildfire that burns truth in its path. Therefore, when we look back at history we do so with envy....
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 6 Feb 2021

Book Review: ‘Mistresses’ by Linda Porter

Mistresses: Sex and Scandal at the Court of Charles II, written by historian Linda Porter and published by Picador in 2020, is the second book on the Stuarts of the seventeenth century by Dr Porter, the first being, Royal Renegades: The Children of Charles...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 9 Oct 2020

The Last Rebel, The Last Battle

As the latest biography of James, the Duke of Monmouth notes:At first light on July 6, 1685, the last battle ever fought on English soil was almost over. On one side of the watery pasture at Sedgemoor was the dashing thirty-six-year-old Duke of Monmouth,...

Guest Post by Anita Davison: “My Fascination with the 17th Century”

Good day to you all! Please welcome 17th-century historical fiction author Anita Davison (who writes as Anita Seymour) to The Seventeenth Century Lady! ______________________________________________________ I was born in Islington, and hail from a family...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 20 Nov 2014

Guest Post by Anna Belfrage: “Falling in Love with Mr Unknown”

Today I have the pleasure of welcome my friend – and fellow 17th-century buff – Anna Belfrage to The Seventeenth Century Lady. Anna has written several wonderful historical novels, and I’m sure you’ll love her guest post. _______________...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 19 Nov 2014

“New Worlds” Review: A Biased Look at the 1680s

Many of you know that I was eagerly anticipating this programme ever since I heard about it. I am always so pleased when filmmakers decide to set a story in the 17th-century. The more programmes and films that are made about this time period will make...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 2 Apr 2014

The Death of Queen Mary II

This post is dedicated to Mary, a controversial, intelligent, beautiful, ill-fated, yet beloved Queen, died on this day the 28th of December, 1694. She was only thirty-two years old.   I say that she was controversial because her reign was, and still...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 28 Dec 2013

Penning Series Novels: Guest post by Francine Howarth

Please welcome Historical fiction/romance writer, Francine Howarth to The Seventeenth Century Lady!  Thank you so much Andrea for inviting me over to your blog and for letting me run riot across the page brandishing sword, pistol and musket in true...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 17 Sep 2013

Five interview questions for a historical figure!

In an interview with Charles II, I would ask the following: Were you frightened that the same fate that befell your father would eventually happen to you? Once and for all, were you, or were you not, married to Lucy Walter? If not, why do you believe...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 27 Aug 2013

His Last Mistress Book Talk & Virtual Tour

Thursday night at Fleetwood Public Library in Lancashire, I gave my first book talk about His Last Mistress. I met some really lovely people and it was an enjoyable evening. My husband was filming the event, but only 1/3 of the talk was captured because...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 18 Aug 2013

The Stuart Curse: The Tragic Lives of a 17th-Century Dynasty

Hello everyone! This is just a heads up. My guest post entitled, The Stuart Curse: The Tragic Lives of a 17th-Century Dynasty is on the English Historical Fiction Authors page now. I hope you enjoy it.
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 22 Jul 2013

Monmouth’s Resting Place in the Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula

On Monday the 15th of July, I went to Tower Hill where I spoke about the life of James Scott, Duke of Monmouth. I will now include photos and excerpts I used from contemporary sources. It was a beautiful day to remember a beautiful man. It was a very...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 17 Jul 2013

Ford, Lord Grey of Werke

Ford, Lord Grey, was one of the Duke of Monmouth’s closest friends, and played a particularly important role both in the Rye-House Plot of 1683 and Monmouth’s Rebellion in 1685. During the course of researching His Last Mistress, I re-read...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 3 Jul 2013

The Greatest Romances Are Tragedies

I am an unabashed romantic. That being said, I do not require the majority of the books I read to end happily ever after. In fact, all of my favourite romances from history and literature have been tragic. I grew up reading Arthurian legends, Thomas Hardy,...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 16 Jun 2013

Event: The 328th Anniversary of Monmouth’s Execution

This will be an informal meetup to commemorate the tragic execution of James Scott, Duke of Monmouth and Buccleuch on the 15th of July, 1685. We will meet by the plaque between Tower Hill Tube Station and The Liberty Bounds pub. This is generally the...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 6 Jun 2013

Excerpts from John Dryden’s Poetical Works

The 313th anniversary of the death of the major seventeenth-century Restoration dramatist and first Poet Laureate, John Dryden, occurred recently on the 1st of May (1700). I felt quite bad about neglecting such an event, so here’s my little homage...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 12 May 2013

Monmouth novella sent off today!

Hi everyone! I’ve been a busy little bee in recent days, well, recent months. After writing the novella, sending it around to four proofreaders, hacking it up and re-writing bits, changing things here and there, I finally just sent it to the publishers....
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 29 Apr 2013

Taunton Castle & The Bloody Assizes

Taunton Castle now houses the Museum of Somerset, which is a fabulous place for both human history and natural history, with fossils and other fascinating things from the prehistoric past. It’s definitely worth visiting if you’re in the West...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 17 Apr 2013

The Blake Museum

Blake Museum is nestled in a little street near the heart of Bridgwater, only a few minutes walk from St. Mary’s Church at 5 Blake Street, Bridgwater, TA6 3NB. This was the home of Admiral Robert Blake (1598-1657) who was one of the most important...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 16 Apr 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.