The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Early Modern"

Showing 1 - 20 of 1842

Your search for posts with tags containing Early Modern found 1842 posts

Astrolabes and Armillary Spheres

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is hosting a virtual discussion of scientific instruments and scientific knowledge in the Renaissance. Here is the announcement from the Center for Renaissance Studies: Astrolabes...

Drinking the Ink of Prayer

By Genie Yoo  [1] Sometimes historians dream of moments of recognition in the manuscripts they encounter. The act of reading or reciting, writing or copying, can trigger a distant memory, allowing one to draw a line connecting two seemingly unrelated...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Oct 2020

How to Teach about Violence in France

In the wake of the horrific murder of history teacher Samuel Paty, historians are grappling with how to teach students and the public about the history of violence in France. Paty taught history and geography at a collège (middle school) in...

Colouring metals in the Far East

By Agnese Benzonelli How far can someone go in the name of research? In my case quite a long way. For a month, I loosely taped tiny plates of metal to my hands and woke up every morning with green stains on them. I was investigating craft recipes employed...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Oct 2020

Things of Darkness and Early Modern Critical Race Studies

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is hosting a series of discussions on Race in Dialogue, which focuses on critical race studies in the humanities. Graduate students in HIST 522 Early Modern Europe at Northern Illinois University...

Expanding the Renaissance

The Renaissance Society of America is organizing an online graduate student workshop on Expanding the Renaissance. The workshop is being organized by the RSA Graduate Student Advisory Committee, which has issued a call for papers. The workshop will held...

Online Seminar Series | Intoxicating Spaces Project: ‘What’s Your Poison?’

The Sheffield-based ‘Intoxicating Spaces’ project, funded by HERA (Humanities in the European Research Area), is hosting five free digital talks, open to all, exploring the history of specific intoxicants. Seminars will take place on Wednesdays at 1–2pm...
From: SCEMS on 10 Oct 2020

Book Review: ‘Mistresses’ by Linda Porter

Mistresses: Sex and Scandal at the Court of Charles II, written by historian Linda Porter and published by Picador in 2020, is the second book on the Stuarts of the seventeenth century by Dr Porter, the first being, Royal Renegades: The Children of Charles...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 9 Oct 2020

Around the Table: The Making and Knowing Project

This month on Around the Table, we have a very special treat. Many of our contributors have been a part of the Making and Knowing Project and we have enjoyed occasional updates on the project throughout the years. Here, we have an update and reflection...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Oct 2020

War and Society Paper Prizes

Are you writing a paper dealing with the history of war and society during academic year 2020-20201? If so, you may be eligible to submit your paper for consideration for a Best Paper Prize from the War and Society Program at Chapman University. Students...

Artemisia Gentileschi Exhibition in London

A major exhibition on Artemisia Gentileschi’s paintings just opened at the National Gallery in London. The New York Times reports: “The National Gallery opted for a one-word title for its new blockbuster show: ‘Artemisia.’...

History Today: Hans Holbein: The Artist in a Changing World by Jeanne Nuechterlein

In Augsburg’s Staatsgalerie Altdeutsche Meister there is a three-paneled painting illustrating the life of St Paul, painted by local artist Hans Holbein the Elder in 1504. Commissioned for the city’s Dominican convent of St Katherine, it includes,...
From: Mathew Lyons on 30 Sep 2020

Powerful Bundles: The Materiality of Protection Amulets in Early Modern Switzerland

By Eveline Szarka If you shop around for a protection amulet today, you will most likely stumble upon ornamental jewellery. More often than not these pieces are round in shape, and pieces featuring Kabbalistic or runic symbols are especially popular....
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Sep 2020

Women and Alchemy

 Antonio Neri, 1598-1600,MS Ferguson 67, f. 25r.It is certain that women have participated in the practice of alchemy since its beginnings, but hard documentation is scant. Maria Prophetissima, also known as Mary the Jewess, is perhaps the best known...
From: Conciatore on 16 Sep 2020

Saint Sebastian and the Arrows of the Plague

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library has published a new episode of its series on Learning from Premodern Plagues on “Saint Sebastian and the Arrows of the Plague.” Students in my courses on HIST 110 History of the Western...

Murder in Lausanne: The Death of an English Regicide in Exile

The Reformed Church of St François in Lausanne in the 19th century. On Thursday, 11 August 1664 the Englishman John Lisle was shot dead in bright daylight on his way to church in Lausanne. His killers had been observing his moves. They knew his...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 5 Sep 2020

Archaeological Fieldwork in the Age of Enlightenment

Jennifer Westerfeld (University of Louisville) will offer an online seminar on “‘I await the financial recovery of France’: Funding Archaeological Fieldwork in the Age of Enlightenment” on 18 September 2020. This seminar is hosted...

Marketing Premodern Studies Beyond Academia

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library recently hosted an online seminar on Marketing Premodern Studies Beyond Academia. This seminar, organized by Christopher Fletcher (Newberry Library) and Lindsey Martin (Northwestern University)...

Graduate Student Conference in Renaissance Studies

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library has issued a call for papers for its annual Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference. The conference will be held through virtual roundtables held on 8-13 February 2021. Gradaute students...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.