The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Early Modern China"

Your search for posts with tags containing Early Modern China found 20 posts

A Tale of Chiles, a Servant, and a Travelling Medical Scholar in Early Modern China

By Brian Dott   Fascinated by early modern Chinese cultural history, I research popular religion, especially pilgrimage, and the culinary and medical uses of chile peppers.  Eating Sichuan food, I wondered “how did the Chinese begin to consume such...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 Jan 2022

Colouring metals in the Far East

By Agnese Benzonelli How far can someone go in the name of research? In my case quite a long way. For a month, I loosely taped tiny plates of metal to my hands and woke up every morning with green stains on them. I was investigating craft recipes employed...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Oct 2020

Revisiting He Bian’s Fetch Me at Pearl Nest Street: Rhubarb Pills as Panacea in Qing China

Today we revisit He Bian’s fascinating post from 2018. Here, He tells us about the global trade in Chinese rhubarb (dahuang) roots, panaceas and notions of difference in premodern theories of the body. Fascinated by this post and want to learn more...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Jul 2020

Cold Wombs and Cold Semen: Explaining Sonlessness in Sixteenth-century China

By Yi-Li Wu Throughout imperial China, a family’s well-being and longevity required the birth of sons. [Fig. 1]  Sons performed the ancestral rites, inherited land, and were responsible for supporting aged parents. And only men could take the...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Dec 2018

Fetch Me at Pearl Nest Street: Rhubarb Pills as Panacea in Qing China

He Bian In the late eighteenth century, American ginseng opened up a new niche market in Qing China. At the same time, Chinese rhubarb (dahuang) roots, harvested from the northwest regions of the empire, were transported by Chinese traders all the way...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 May 2018

Translating Recipes 14: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 8 – BETWEEN 3

[This is the third of a three-part posting on BETWEEN-ness in recipes and their translation. For the first two parts, see here and here.] The following is a translation of our long-translated Manchu medical recipe in dialogue form, to explore the between-ness...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Jan 2016

Translating Recipes 13: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 7 – BETWEEN

[This is the second of a three-part posting on BETWEEN-ness in recipes and their translation. For the first part, see here.] Happy new year, readers of the Translating Recipes series! When last we met, I was telling you about the latest exploration of...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Jan 2016

Translating Recipes 12: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 6 – BETWEEN

By Carla Nappi (This is part of an ongoing series of posts exploring prepositional attitudes and their translation in recipe literature. For the previous posts, check out this link.) In the most recent posts of the “Translating Recipes”...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 May 2015

Translating Recipes 11: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 5 – …A Flowing Oil…

By Carla Nappi (This is part of an ongoing series of posts exploring prepositional attitudes and their translation in recipe literature. For the previous posts, check out this link.) In my previous post, we talked about the importance of the …...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 May 2015

Translating Recipes 10: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 4 – AFTER

By Carla Nappi (This is part of an ongoing series of posts exploring prepositional attitudes and their translation in recipe literature. For the previous posts, see here, here, and here!) Last time we met, we talked about the importance of … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Apr 2015

Translating Recipes 9: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 3 – IF

By Carla Nappi (This is part of an ongoing series of posts exploring prepositional attitudes and their translation in recipe literature. For the previous posts, see here and here!) One of the most important aspects of a recipe is the … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Feb 2015

Seiseinyū and secrets: problems of recipe attribution in early modern Japan

In my last post, I looked at the problems faced by early modern Japanese doctors trying to figure out how to manufacture a new mercurial drug called seiseinyū, which had first appeared in the Chinese doctor Chen Sicheng’s Secret Record … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Jan 2015

Translating Recipes 8: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 2 - WITH

[This is the second post in a multi-part mini-series on Recipes in Time and Space. For previous installments in this mini-series, see here.] One of the most important aspects of a recipe is the work that it does to bring … Continue reading →
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Jan 2015

Translating Recipes 7: Recipes in Time and Space, Part 1

…There is not a conjunction or a preposition, and hardly an adverbial phrase, syntactic form, or inflection of voice, in human speech, that does not express some shading or other of relation which we at some moment actually feel to … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Jan 2015

Translating Recipes 6: Fluid Translation 2

By Carla Nappi [This is the second post in a two-part series on Fluid Translation. Read the first post in the series here.] One way of thinking about how to convey a sense of fluidity, flow, and movement to a … Continue reading →
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Aug 2014

Translating Recipes 5: Fluid Translation 1

By Carla Nappi [This is the first post in a two-part series on Fluid Translation. For the second post, check back tomorrow!] Welcome back to the “Translating Recipes” series! For the next two posts, we’ll continue to think about the … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Aug 2014

Translating Recipes 4: The Girl, the Scorpion, and the Doctor

By Carla Nappi Hi there! In my previous post, I described an experiment in translating a Manchu medical recipe into a fairy tale. This is the second half of that discussion. What you have below, similar to what we did … Continue reading →
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Apr 2014

Translating Recipes 3: Fairy Tale Drugs

By Carla Nappi Hello again! When last we met, I was telling you about a recent and ongoing experiment in translating Manchu-language medical recipes into different storytelling forms as a way to get at the narrative power of drug texts … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Apr 2014

Translating Recipes 1: Narrating Qing Bodies

By Carla Nappi I study and write about the history of science and medicine in early modern Eurasia, with a focus on China in that contex. In particular, I’m interested in how medical and culinary recipes were translated in the … Continue reading...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Jan 2014

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.