The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Early Modern Food"

Your search for posts with tags containing Early Modern Food found 16 posts

Two letters about cheese

Around six letters sent to Agnes Leslie, Lady Lochleven survive, four in the National Library of Scotland and two in the National Records of Scotland. Two letters are about cheese: cheese bought in Stirling by her agent Alexander Bruce, and cheese gifted...
From: Objects and the archive on 28 Aug 2020

Advice from an Edinburgh apothecary, 1568

Advice for a patient with gonorrhoea sent by Thomas Davidson, an apothecary in Edinburgh, 24 March 1568. This letter was probably sent to William Douglas, Laird of Lochleven. Davidson died in 1574 and his registered will includes a full inventory of his...
From: Objects and the archive on 27 Aug 2020

‘Very weary of their service’ – Working for Anna of Denmark in Scotland

In July 1602 Jens Pierson wanted to go home to visit his parents and friends in Denmark. He had worked for twelve years in Scotland looking after Anna of Denmark’s horses. James VI noted he ‘as yit is unrecompensit in any sort’ and gave...
From: Objects and the archive on 20 May 2019

Twelve Days of EMROC

Come join us for 12 celebratory days of transcriptions! From Boxing Day (Dec. 26) to Epiphany (Jan. 6), EMROC is hosting a transcription event in which we invite you to participate by transcribing Constance Hall Her Book of Receipts Anno Domini 1672,...
From: emroc on 7 Dec 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS: IARHS and the IMC 2016: "Food, Feast, and Famine."

Leeds, 4-7 July 2016The International Association for Robin Hood Studies is proposing two sessions for next year's Leeds, whose conference theme is "Food, Feast, and Famine."Leeds will only consider fully formed sessions. Please send 300-word abstracts...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 4 Jul 2016

Halloween Special: Food fit for a witch

Ready for carving Hurrah, Halloween is nearly upon us! I am a huge fan of Halloween – I love the weather at this time of year, the food, the costume parties (though admittedly it has been a few years since I last went to one), all of it. I feel...
From: Gastronomy Archaeology on 30 Oct 2013

Gingerbread Part 2: Cooking and the recipe

Well, I finally made gingerbread! There were a number of different recipes to choose from, but I went with good old Hannah Woolley since this recipe included most of the common elements I’d seen in the other recipes. Here it is: To make Ginger-bread. Take...
From: Gastronomy Archaeology on 18 Jul 2013

Salads

“Lettuce “Concept” ” by photofarmer. Used under a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 2.0) Happy New Year everyone! Christmas, with all it’s delightful foods, is over, and now it’s January, the month when many...
From: Gastronomy Archaeology on 6 Jan 2013

Christmas Special part 2: Cooking minced pies

And so, the thrilling conclusion to my special Christmas post on mince pies! I used a recipe from Robert May’s The Accomplisht Cook (1660), as I pointed out in the last post, there were a number of different recipes involving different ingredients,...
From: Gastronomy Archaeology on 21 Dec 2012

Christmas Special: Minced Pies

I once knew a chap who absolutely hated mince pies. To be honest they are not my favourite Christmas fare, but they are quite nice in the right context (hot, topped with some thick brandy cream and served with a glass of mulled wine of the side, ideally)....
From: Gastronomy Archaeology on 13 Dec 2012

Beef

A Victorian cow butchery diagram. Click the picture to go to Miss Mary’s Victorian and Vintage Archive, where I found the picture Hello hello! I have not disappeared off the face of the blogosphere, I have just been working very hard finishing a...
From: Gastronomy Archaeology on 16 Nov 2012

Hippocras part 2: The recipe

  It would be a bit of a stretch to call this post “cooking and the recipe” as I usually subtitle the second parts of my food adventures. This is a ridiculously easy recipe, and unlike either of the other drink based recipes I’ve...
From: Gastronomy Archaeology on 6 Oct 2012

Hippocras

Hippocrates, engraving by Peter Paul Rubens, 1638. Image via Wikipedia. In this blog, I’m looking drink rather than food, and like the drinks I’ve looked at before, this one is alcoholic. Early modern people drank rather a lot of alcohol,...
From: Gastronomy Archaeology on 25 Sep 2012

Cakes: Cooking and the recipe

  For this recipe I’m going back a little further than usual – the majority of the recipes I cook tend to be mid-17th century, but this one if from the late 16th century. I’m using Thomas Dawson’s The good huswifes jewell...
From: Gastronomy Archaeology on 2 Sep 2012

Cakes: History and background

Stacked Books Tassles by ChicosMom, found on www.cakecentral.com. Click the picture to head over there and have a look if you want to look at lots of amazing cakes and lose several hours of your life! Finally, a new post! I’m afraid the lack of...
From: Gastronomy Archaeology on 1 Sep 2012

Buttered beer: Cooking and the recipe

This is a nice easy recipe, with nice, easy to find ingredients. So why has it taken me so long to make? I blame the weather. It has just been too hot to drink creamy, warm beer – definitely cider weather over the last week or two. But now, the...
From: Gastronomy Archaeology on 1 Aug 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.