The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "East India Company"

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Your search for posts with tags containing East India Company found 56 posts

The East India Company

We have no idea quite why, but we seem to have been drawn to the East India Company (EIC) or The Honourable East India Company as it was also known, in so much of our research. Whilst researching Grace Dalrymple Elliott and her family we discovered that...
From: All Things Georgian on 5 Nov 2019

The East India Company and Parliament’s Fateful Decision of 1767

India, the fabled land of rubies, diamonds, gold, tigers, and mystery, captured the imagination of the British people in the mid 1700s. Robert Clive... The post The East India Company and Parliament’s Fateful Decision of 1767 appeared first on Journal...

Anon. ‘Robin Hood’ (1828)

The following poem, written anonymously and titled simply as ‘Robin Hood’, appeared in The Oriental Observer and Literary Chronicle in 1828. The newspaper, printed in Calcutta during the rule of the East India Company, went through a number...

The 400-Year-Old Rivalry

Liz Covart is the Digital Projects Editor at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the Creator and Host of Ben Franklin’s World, an award-winning podcast about early American history. On June 29 and 30, the oldest rivalry...
From: The Junto on 26 Jun 2019

The Crime of Sati

By Stephen Basdeo Britain and India have a long and interconnected history. Queen Elizabeth I was by no means an imperialist monarch, but her one major contribution to the rise of the British Empire was the granting of a Royal Charter to the Governor...

Resolutions Shared by Two Towns 300 Miles Apart

The year was 1773. On May 10, Parliament had passed the Tea Act allowed the East India Company to sell tea directly to the... The post Resolutions Shared by Two Towns 300 Miles Apart appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The children of India worshiping the golden calf

“Indian men and women kneel before a large rectangular pedestal on which stands a golden calf with the head of Hastings. Three Indians lie on the pedestal at Hastings’s feet, making gestures of despair and entreaty. From his mouth protrudes...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 21 Dec 2018

Revealing new information about the courtesan, Nelly O’Brien

Sir Joshua Reynolds painted the courtesan, Nelly O’Brien twice, between 1762 and 1764. Both paintings were paid for by her lover, Frederick St John, 2nd Viscount Bolingbroke, although she was introduced to Reynolds by Admiral Augustus Keppel, 1st...
From: All Things Georgian on 4 Dec 2018

Bengal troops on the line of march : a panaoramic sketch

Plate 1 of 6 Printmaker: Ludlow, William Andrew. Title: Bengal troops on the line of march : a panaoramic sketch / by an officer of that army [i.e. Capt. Ludlow]. Published: [London] : Day and Haghe’s Zincy, [1850?] Catalog Record...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 3 Oct 2018

"Beyond America: The East India Papers of Lords North and Cornwallis," by Adam Nadeau

Guest blogger Adam Nadeau is a PhD candidate at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. He recently completed a four week residency as a 2018-19 David Library Fellow conducting research for his dissertation examining British...

“The Mohawks were prepared to do their Duty”

On the afternoon of 22 Apr 1774, Capt. James Chambers admitted to the committee enforcing New York City’s tea boycott that he had brought in eighteen chests of tea on his ship London.The 25 April New-York Gazette reported, “The Owners [of...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Aug 2018

“Expose so considerable a property to inevitable destruction”

Yesterday we left Capt. Benjamin Lockyer in New York City, having arrived on 20 Apr 1774 after a long, stormy voyage from London with 698 chests of East India Company tea.He in turn had left his damaged ship Nancy floating outside the official harbor...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Aug 2018

“The determined Resolution of the Citizens” of New York

Now I’ll get back to the New York Tea Party of 1774. New Yorkers had mobilized against the East India Company specially taxed tea in the fall of 1773 like the people of the other major American ports. But they had no tea to mobilize against....
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Aug 2018

Capt. James Chambers on the London

As promised, I’m going to explore the story of the “New York Tea Party.” And I’ll start with the sea captain James Chambers. The Roster of Saint Andrew’s Society of the State of New York, compiled by William M. McBean in...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Aug 2018

The Most Valuable Treasure Ship found off the coast of Cornwall England. The President Merchant Ship-East India Company.

Isaac Sailmaker - Two Views of an East Indiaman of the Time of King William III.https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6497046/britains-richest-shipwreck-worth-8million-today-is-found-off-cornwall/http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5826637/Divers-discover-17th-century-anchors-330-year-old-remains-Britains-richest-shipwreck.html
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 12 Jun 2018

Early Modern Exchanges: Being Black in Tudor England / Being English in Mughal India

Mar 14, 2018 05:00 PM Location: IAS Seminar Room 20, first floor, South Wing, UCL Black Tudors: Three Untold StoriesDr. Miranda Kaufmann tells the intriguing tales of three Africans: a diver employed by Henry VIII to recover guns from the wreck of the...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 14 Mar 2018

The story of a domesticated tiger

On December 26th, 1788 the ship, Pitt East Indiaman, which was owned by the East India Company and captained by Edward Manning set sail for St Helena, Benkulen and then China. She reached St Helena in March 1789, Benkulen in July, arriving in China...
From: All Things Georgian on 27 Feb 2018

How Shipping Speeds Rose in the 1780s

The Center for Economic and Policy Research’s VOX portal has just published Morgan Kelly and Cormac Ó Gráda’s précis of a study titled “Speed under Sail During the Early Industrial Revolution”.The authors say:The...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Feb 2018

Eastern Promise: Mughal India and the East India Company

We never initially set out to research Mughal India and the East India Company (EIC) but, time and time again, the people we were looking at took us east. It all started with the eighteenth-century courtesan, Grace Dalrymple Elliott’s family. Grace...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 Dec 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.