The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Easter"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Easter found 93 posts

Easter Egg Traditions

Happy Easter, gentle readers. Eastertide was an important time for the devout Austen family, as it is for Christians today. Over the centuries, more secular activities were included in the celebrations. This morning we are anticipating the annual Easter...
From: Jane Austen's World on 17 Apr 2022

Weekend baking: Easter treats

 This week, two different treats (and I'm trying to convince myself that I do NOT need to bake a cake).First, M&M cookies bars; second, Easter mini egg cookies. Both are delicious and both involve an excess amount of chocolate and sugar. And I am...
From: The Seacoast of Bohemia on 16 Apr 2022

The French Republic of Letters, Persia, and the Global Age of Revolutions

By Junko Takeda In 1721, the same year as the publication of Montesquieu’s Lettres persanes, the Afghan Ghilji chief Mahmud Hotak began making incursions into Persia. After besieging Isfahan, he overthrew Shah Soltan Hosayn and forced the...
From: Age of Revolutions on 12 Apr 2021

Easter in Jane Austen’s Day: a pastiche of information

Happy Easter, gentle readers. Many of the customs followed in the early 19th century by Jane Austen and her family are still followed today in one fashion or another. For this blog post, I have gathered information already known to many, and some that...
From: Jane Austen's World on 4 Apr 2021

Lenten fasts and Easter feasts chez Voltaire

A new government financial year begins in the UK today, which is why the Chancellor delivered the Budget last month. Voltaire’s housekeeper at Ferney may have engaged in some budgeting as well, though all that has come down to us to date are the...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 1 Apr 2021

John Spottiswoode, The History of the Church of Scotland (1655)

John Spottiswoode’s The History of the Church of Scotland, subtitled Beginning the Year of Our Lord 203, and Continued to the End of the Reign of King James the VI, was first published in 1655 and now survives in numerous copies. Spottiswoode was...

Easter at Anne Hathaway’s in lockdown

Anne Hathaway’s Cottage Describing Easter, Nicholas Breton in Fastasticks wrote “There is mirth and job where there is health and liberty…I conclude it is a day of much delightfulness: the sun’s dancing day and the Earth’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 12 Apr 2020

The Pittsburgh Waste Book. Trade Items 1759.

PAGE ONE.My Thanks to Spence for the link to this book.Keith.https://digital.library.pitt.edu/islandora/object/pitt%3A31735061278424/viewer#page/8/mode/2up;
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Feb 2020

Trail food bags & containers.

Trail Food Bags & Containers. "I have travelled with neere 200. of them at once, neere 100. miles through the woods, every man carrying a little Basket of this [Nokehick] at his back, and sometimes in a hollow Leather Girdle about his middle,...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 12 Jul 2019

Irish Autograph Albums: The Arts of Resistance

“Revolutionary Material Culture Series” This series examines the Age of Revolutions through its material markers, reminding us that materials themselves reflected and shaped political cultures around the revolutionary Atlantic and World. By...
From: Age of Revolutions on 6 May 2019

Practical Piety: A History of Easter Finery

Oh, I could write a sonnet about your Easter bonnet… Irving Berlin, Easter Parade (1933) Built around Irving Berlin’s song of the same name, the classic musical Easter Parade begins and ends with the famed titular event, as the who’s...
From: Ludicrus Histories on 29 Apr 2019

Chesapeake Bay Privateers in the Revolution

Chesapeake Bay Privateers in the Revolution by Leonard Szaltis (The History Press, 2019) Leonard Szaltis does the reader the favor of stipulating the intent... The post Chesapeake Bay Privateers in the Revolution appeared first on Journal of the American...

Easter Bunny - 18th-Century Pennsylvania Fractur

This drawing is an example of a Pennsylvania German tradition of decorated manuscripts known as fraktur.  This delightful image is attributed to tailor, sailor, & schoolmaster Johann Conrad Gilbert (1734–1812), who emigrated from Germany...
From: 18th-century American Women on 21 Apr 2019

One a penny, two a penny, hot cross buns!

Easter just wouldn’t be Easter without hot cross buns. These sweet, spiced buns were also popular throughout the Georgian era, known both as cross buns as well as hot cross buns, and traditionally eaten on Good Friday. The well-known song relating...
From: All Things Georgian on 18 Apr 2019

Yuchi Fashion Week, 1736

  Welcome back to week two  of our #ColonialCouture roundtable! Today’s post is by Jessica Yirush Stern, associate professor of history at California State University, Fullerton, and the author of The Lives in Objects: Native Americans,...
From: The Junto on 17 Sep 2018

Revolution and Arab Existentialism in the Era of Decolonization: An Interview with Yoav Di-Capua

By Naghmeh Sohrabi Yoav Di-Capua’s No Exit: Arab Existentialism, Jean Paul Sartre, and Decolonization reads like a thriller in many senses of the word. Ostensibly about the “rendezvous between Arab intellectuals, Jean-Paul Sartre, his French...
From: Age of Revolutions on 9 Jul 2018

Back Bay Easter

We were a small party for Easter this year so we went to the St. Botolph Club in Boston for a buffet of oysters, salmon, eggs benedict, coq au vin, and lamb (no ham). This is the artsy old Boston club, and I always enjoy going there because the walls...
From: streets of salem on 2 Apr 2018

An 18th Century Easter Meal

With Easter not too far away it is the perfect time to prepare a lovely meal for the family. If you’re feeling brave why not try some of these 18th Century recipes to tempt your loved ones. Firstly, hare soup: Cut your hare in quarters, and the...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 23 Mar 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.