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Search Results for "Ebenezer Richardson"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Ebenezer Richardson found 24 posts

Three New Interviews

A couple of weeks ago I wore collared shirts and shaved almost every day of the week.That’s because I was scheduled to participate a series of online conversations that were recorded for viewing. First, I spoke with Bob Allison and Jonathan Lane...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Mar 2021

“Jury went out after noon and did not agree all night”

On 20 Apr 1770, Benjamin Lynde, acting chief justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court, wrote in his diary:Fair. Richardson and Wilmot’s tryal, begun morn. and Jury went out after noon and did not agree all night.As recounted yesterday, Lynde...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Apr 2020

The Trial of Ebenezer Richardson

On 20 Apr 1770, 250 years ago today, Ebenezer Richardson went on trial for the killing of young Christopher Seider.This was just short of two months after the fatal confrontation at Richardson’s house in the North End, but for the Boston Whigs that...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Apr 2020

Ebenezer Richardson’s New Attorney

On 17 Apr 1770, 250 years ago today, the Massachusetts Superior Court convened to try Ebenezer Richardson and George Wilmot for murdering young Christopher Seider.At least, the court tried to. The attorney whom the judges had ordered to represent Richardson,...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Apr 2020

Samuel Fitch Takes the Case

Jonathan Sewall wasn’t the only attorney missing from the big trials in Boston in the spring of 1770.As the Massachusetts Superior Court geared up for the Boston Massacre trials, Ebenezer Richardson was having a hard time finding a lawyer to represent...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Apr 2020

The Mystery of Ebenezer Richardson’s Mother

A very long month ago, on the day we reenacted the Boston Massacre for its Sestercentennial, I stopped by the Edes and Gill print shop in Faneuil Hall.Andrew Volpe was printing his recreation of Paul Revere’s engraving of the Massacre. As proprietor...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Apr 2020

A New Month in Boston, the Same Old Arguments

What did the Customs service’s anonymous informer report about Thursday, 1 Mar 1770, 250 years ago today? He (or she) wrote: “the weekley Exhibition at Jacksons as usual.” Boys were once again picketing William Jackson’s hardware...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Mar 2020

“A youth, son to Captain John Gore”

The older boy wounded by Ebenezer Richardson’s shot on 22 Feb 1770 was nineteen-year-old Samuel Gore.He appears here in his early-1750s portrait by John Singleton Copley, a detail from a painting now at Winterthur. Of course, this when Sammy was...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Feb 2020

The Life and Death of Christopher Seider

The younger boy hit by “Swan shot” from Ebenezer Richardson’s musket on 22 Feb 1770 was named Christopher Seider (although that last name also showed up as Snider and in other forms). Christopher’s story starts with an effort to...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Feb 2020

“The first thought was to hang him up at once”

When Ebenezer Richardson fired his musket out of window of his house on 22 Feb 1770, as recounted yesterday, that gun was loaded with “Swan shot.” Those were lead pellets ”about the bigness of large peas”—larger than “Goose...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Feb 2020

Riot at the Richardson House

By 22 Feb 1770, 250 years ago today, the anonymous informant reporting events in Boston to Customs Collector Joseph Harrison judged that the Sons of Liberty had “seemed greatly to gain ground” over the previous week. One piece of evidence...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Feb 2020

The Great 1770 Quiz Answers, Part 1

Thanks to everyone who puzzled over the Great 1770 Quiz, whether or not you entered answers in the comments!It looks like the competition is down to John and Kathy since they answered both parts. If I try this again I hope to remember the bunch all the...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Feb 2020

David Bradlee: “Windows broke when I got there”

We’ve come to the last of the men George Gailer sued for tarring and feathering him in October 1769, the man his legal filing identified as a “Taylor” named “David Bradley.” As it happens, David Bradlee was one of the first...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Nov 2019

Two Looks at Revolutionary New England

This week the Journal of the American Revolution published back-to-back articles about Revolutionary New England. First, Derek W. Beck adapted material from his book The War Before Independence, 1775-1776 to discuss “Henry Knox’s ‘Noble...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Feb 2019

The “Swan Shot” that Killed Christopher Seider

On 22 February 1770, Customs service employee Ebenezer Richardson killed a young boy named Christopher Seider.Christopher was part of a crowd of boys mobbing Richardson’s house. Indeed, he had just stooped to pick up a stone when he was hit by the...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Feb 2018

“A Monument over the grave of young SEIDER”?

On 5 Mar 1770, the Boston Gazette reported on the grand funeral for little Christopher Seider, shot by Ebenezer Richardson on 22 February, and added:We can assure the Publick, that a Monument will be erected over the Grave of young Snider, with an Inscription,...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Oct 2017

“The usual Notice of their intention to plunder & pull down an House”

Eleven days after Andrew Oliver resigned as Massachusetts’s collector of the stamp tax on 15 Aug 1765, the Boston crowd mobilized again. It looks like the Stamp Act was no longer the main grievance on people’s minds on 26 August. Instead,...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Aug 2015

Ebenezer Richardson as a Cause of the American Revolution

This afternoon and for the next two days I’ll be attending the “So Sudden an Alteration” conference at the Massachusetts Historical Society. (Follow along on Twitter via #RevReborn2.)This conference is a sequel to the “American Revolution Reborn”...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Apr 2015

The Limits on Fatal Violence in Boston, 1765-1774

Though Boston earned a reputation as a riotous town in the ten years after the first public Stamp Act protests of 1765, those Boston rioters never killed anyone.A mob did ruin Lt. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s North End mansion in 1765, and damaged several...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Mar 2015

“Otis is in Confusion yet.”

On 6 May 1772, a Boston town meeting elected four men to represent the town in the Massachusetts General Court, or provincial legislature: Thomas Cushing, the House’s longtime Speaker; Samuel Adams, its Clerk; John Hancock; and William Phillips. There...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Oct 2014

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