The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Economic History"

Showing 1 - 20 of 29

Your search for posts with tags containing Economic History found 29 posts

Transnational News and the Irish Free Trade Crisis of 1779

By Joel Herman The gravitational pull of the American Revolution has been given new focus by the transnational turn, as scholars have begun to uncover the influence of the revolution elsewhere in the world.[1] One place where the American revolutionary...
From: Age of Revolutions on 8 Feb 2021

The Economic Authority of Cap-Français’ Marchandes de Couleur on the Eve of Haitian Independence

By Carrie Glenn Doit M. Dupuch & Ducasse à Mde. Poumaroux Pour le compte du general en chef —Savoir— 25₶ de morue 6.$.[1] For merchants in colonial Haiti, prospects appeared dire in the fall of 1803. Britain’s blockade...
From: Age of Revolutions on 6 Apr 2020

Media Moment 1: Bristol’s Audits

This blog introduces a new series of posts related to Middling Culture research: Media Moments.  These posts will provide short “glimpses” into topics that relate to ordinary, everyday lives in early modern England under the scope...
From: Middling Culture on 10 Oct 2019

Democracy and Truth: An Interview with Sophia Rosenfeld

***This interview is part of our ‘Featured Books’ series.*** In Democracy and Truth: A Short History, Sophia Rosenfeld examines the way in which truth functions in democracies, providing historical context for the current crises in both truth...
From: Age of Revolutions on 10 Jun 2019

Reply to Benoît Grenier and Alain Laberge

Allan Greer I am grateful to Benoît Grenier and Alain Laberge for having taken the trouble to read my book and comment on my short polemic, “There was no Seigneurial System.” Indeed, I’m doubly grateful since I relied heavily on...
From: Borealia on 16 Oct 2018

There was no Seigneurial System

Allan Greer From elementary school books to encyclopedia entries to scholarly treatises, no work on New France is complete without a section on the “seigneurial system,” a phenomenon that supposedly shaped the agrarian society of this colony...
From: Borealia on 24 Sep 2018

History on Appeal: Originalism and Evidence in the Comeau Case

Bradley Miller The Supreme Court declined this month to radically change the way that Canada works. In R v Comeau, lawyers for a New Brunswick man ticketed for bringing too many bottles of beer into the province from Quebec urged the justices to use the...
From: Borealia on 3 May 2018

The Economic Revolution in Indian Country

This post is a part of our “Native American Revolutions” Series. By David Andrew Nichols All revolutions contain within them both destructive and creative impulses. For much of the twentieth century, historians of the American Revolution...
From: Age of Revolutions on 23 Oct 2017

Daniel Vickers: His Life and Work

Stephen Hay Daniel Vickers’s life and his work grew together. His colleagues, students, and friends remember him for his love of his family, his services to others, and his humane scholarship. That scholarship applied a disciplined imagination to...
From: Borealia on 18 Feb 2017

Summer Reading 2016

Summer! That wonderful, studentless, seminar-free oasis of uninterrupted relaxation, when we can all settle down to some quality time with those alluring new acquisitions on our bookshelves—and maybe even tackle some of the glowering doorstops that...
From: The Junto on 27 Jun 2016

The Economic History Society Conference, 2016

Better late than never, here are my thoughts on the 2016 Economic History Society conference held at Robinson College Cambridge on the weekend of 1-3 April 2016. This was the best attended of the Society’s conferences to date with over 300 delegates,...
From: Dr Anne L. Murphy on 19 Apr 2016

Continuing the Debate on Slavery and Capitalism

It's been two and a half years since the new history of capitalism marked its arrival with the full red carpet treatment in the New York Times. So it's about time we saw some serious and constructive critiques of the project. Robin Blackburn's lengthy...
From: The Junto on 27 Oct 2015

Article: Hershenzon on Exchanging Slaves Across the Mediterranean, AEH 42 (2014)

Daniel Hershenzon, “[P]ara que me saque cabesa por cabesa…’: Exchanging Muslim and Christian Slaves Across the Mediterranean,” African Economic History 42 (2014): 11-36.
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 12 Aug 2015

Economic Growth and the Historicity of Capitalism

One of the central characteristics of the New History of Capitalism has been its tendency to defer the question of just what “capitalism” is. The project's enquiry starts with the question, not with a predetermined answer. But in order to know where...
From: The Junto on 12 Nov 2014

New Book: Drelichman & Voth, “Lending to The Borrower From Hell”

Mauricio Drelichman and Hans-Joachim Voth, Lending to the Borrower from Hell: Debt, Taxes, and Default in the Age of Philip II (Princeton, 2014). Also, these two coauthored the following article: “Serial defaults, serial profits: Returns to sovereign...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 23 May 2014

Everyday Connections of Colonial Economies: Conference Recap

Sara Damiano summarizes the recent PEAES conference, "Ligaments: Everyday Connections of Colonial Economies."
From: The Junto on 29 Oct 2013

Page 1 of 212Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.