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Search Results for "Editions"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Editions found 45 posts

Aphorism 75 and the Challenges for a Critical Edition

Critical editions are incredibly handy. They transform historical artifacts into an easily read, generic version of some text. They smooth out differences between versions, they correct grammar, and they normalize orthography. The labors of intrepid and...
From: Darin Hayton on 4 Dec 2020

Introducing Tout d’Holbach

Have you ever used Tout Voltaire or the ARTFL Encyclopédie and thought: ‘Wow! This is so helpful!’? Have you ever planned on giving a Zoom talk on pandemics in Diderot and D’Alembert’s Encyclopédie and...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 14 Apr 2020

What else makes a critical edition?

Material constraints in publishing can sometimes have the beneficial effect of focusing attention anew on the importance of the intellectual content of the book. As has happened so many times over the years in bringing out the Œuvres complètes...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 4 Jul 2019

A born-digital edition of Voltaire’s Dialogue entre un brahmane et un jésuite

Just as the print edition of the Œuvres Complètes de Voltaire is fast approaching its completion, we at the Voltaire Foundation are starting work on two new, highly ambitious digital projects thanks to the generosity of the Andrew W. Mellon...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 21 Mar 2019

Samuel Girardet’s A.B.C

While Neuchâtel’s publishers counterfeited many editions, they were not immune from having their own original editions ripped-off elsewhere. The Le Locle bookseller Samuel Girardet’s school primer Nouvelle méthode d’enseigner...
From: Selling Enlightenment on 26 Feb 2019

The Humanist World of Voltaire’s Correspondence

We know from reading Voltaire’s letters that he likes quoting – French literature in abundance, but also a fair amount of Latin. There is often a strong sense that he is quoting from memory, which is more than likely the lasting mark of his...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 7 Feb 2019

The 10 best audiobooks of my year

My father became an avid “listener” of books at the end of his life as his eyesight gave out. The player and an endless supply of books on tape (in his category of choice) came to him free of charge thanks to an association for the blind in...
From: Baroque Explorations on 21 Dec 2018

The Newberry French Revolution Collection at ARTFL

As we begin planning Digitizing Enlightenment IV, which will take place in the context of the ISECS Congress in Edinburgh in July 2019, we are keen to broaden the scope and breadth of the Digitizing Enlightenment community in order to highlight new, and...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 6 Dec 2018

More Madame d’Aulnoy

Six months ago this blog presented the very rare first edition of Marie-Catherine d’Aulnoy’s Les Contes des fées, of which a complete set (including engraved frontispieces in volumes 1 and 3) is preserved at the Württembergische...
From: Anecdota on 17 Oct 2018

Finding focus

I’ve been visually challenged this summer. Two cataract surgeries have made reading a challenge. That’s a problem for a writer! For a time I felt like Mr. Magoo. Having worn glasses for over 50 years, it felt strange not to be wearing them....
From: Baroque Explorations on 27 Jul 2018

Le ‘Voltaire de Beuchot’ à la lettre: sources d’une édition savante sous la Restauration

Œuvres de Voltaire, Beuchot (éd.), Paris, Lefèvre, t.1, 1834. BnF. Si elle n’égale celle du patriarche ni par son ampleur, ni par son lustre, ni par la célébrité de ses intervenants, la correspondance...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 3 Jul 2018

A wonderful audible edition of The Game of Hope

I’m writing this in Toronto, a long way from home. Tomorrow I have a full schedule of two interviews, a book store signing, and then, in the evening, a book launch of The Game of Hope. I sent off the final corrections to The Game of Hope last...
From: Baroque Explorations on 21 May 2018

Extracts from Sir Thomas Mitchell’s travels to the Eastern Interior Vol1

My thanks to The Bunyip for supplying this article.http://neclhg.freeforums.net/thread/315/history-water-australia?page=1&scrollTo=405HEADING TO THE NORTH WEST NSW – NAMOI AND GWYDIR 1831PROVIDENTIAL SUPPLY. A rather elevated but grassy...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 8 Feb 2018

The National Gallery of Art, Washington opens America Collects Eighteenth-Century French Painting

Main facade of the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license. The National Gallery of Art, Washington recently opened America Collects Eighteenth-Century...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 23 Jun 2017

Henry E. Huntington, the Greatest Book Collector

In “Why America buys England’s books,” a 1927 article in the Atlantic Monthly, Philadelphia bookseller Rosenbach wrote that Henry E. Huntington was the “greatest collector of books the world has ever known.” The London Times...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 28 Mar 2017

Happy New 2017: on revision, a great classic on Audible, my next newsletter

  Happy New 2017! I like the feel of this year already. I’ve weaned myself — to some extent — from toxic international news and immersed myself in finishing the eighth draft of Moonsick, my YA novel about Josephine’s...
From: Baroque Explorations on 5 Jan 2017

The Œuvres complètes de Voltaire are nearly fifty years old

John Renwick has been a member of the ‘Œuvres complètes de Voltaire’ team since 1970, and of its Conseil scientifique since 1997. Within OCV, he has edited over fifty individual texts, from ‘Amulius et Numitor’ (1711)...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 23 Dec 2016

Shakespeare for the dollhouse

“What’s your smallest book in the library?” is a frequently asked question during stack tours. Our smallest book is probably the ‘Ellen Terry’ Shakespeare, edited by J. Talfourd Blair and published by David Bryce and Son...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 3 Nov 2016

Poetry in the digital age: the Digital Miscellanies Index and eighteenth-century culture

For most of us, reading for pleasure usually means getting stuck into some fiction or non-fiction. Poetry is a less common diversion, but we still have an appetite for poems to dip into, to find solace in, to memorise and share. And we can choose from...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 23 Aug 2016

34 Copies of Crooke on the Wall

As it turns out, I was lucky enough to be awarded a University of Iowa Graduate College T. Anne Cleary International Dissertation Research Award, which enabled me to take a two-and-a-half week trip to England to look at copies of Crooke’s books,...
From: The Crooke Book on 18 Aug 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.