The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Edmund Kean"

Your search for posts with tags containing Edmund Kean found 11 posts

FT: Dead Famous by Greg Jenner

On Guy Fawkes’ Night in 1709, Henry Sacheverell, an Anglican minister, preached an incediary sermon in St Paul’s against religious non-conformity in the church. It was widely interpreted as a coded attack on the then Whig government, not least...
From: Mathew Lyons on 25 Apr 2020

Edmund Keen (1787-1833), the Tragedian

We had thought about writing about his acting career, but we’re sure there are enough websites that provide all of that, so we decided to take a look at the man behind the theatre – if that’s at all possible. There has always been much...
From: All Things Georgian on 15 Oct 2019

The theatrical atlas

Kean as Richard III, directed to the left, stands on a large volume with the word ‘Shakespear’ written on the top edge. Resting on his head and humped shoulders is a model of Drury Lane Theatre, a massive block, inscribed ‘Whitbreads...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 16 Nov 2018

Philip Massinger re-read: #MassiMara

Philip Massinger It’s become a tradition now for the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon to spend most of June reading the surviving works of writers contemporary with Shakespeare. In 2018, beginning on 11 June, it’s the turn of Philip...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 11 Jun 2018

Reviving the great Edmund Kean

Edmund Kean as Shylock Who wouldn’t wish to have been able to experience the great Edmund Kean performing Shakespeare? He mesmerised his audiences and critic after critic tried to explain how he got his effects. The most famous of all descriptions...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 20 Mar 2018

Keats and Shakespeare at Eton College

 By Sir Stanley Wells Join us at Eton College, Windsor, for a special evening of Keats and Shakespeare on Tuesday 3 October 2017 from 6.30pm until 9.00pm. Find out more by clicking here. https://www.shakespeare.org.uk/visit/whats-on/shakespeare-eton/...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 12 Sep 2017

Francis Raymond: Stratford-upon-Avon’s forgotten theatre manager

The 1827 theatre in Chapel Lane, around 1860 Stratford-upon-Avon’s early theatrical history is a subject that is often overlooked, dominated as it now is by the Royal Shakespeare Company. In fact the town’s first proper theatre opened in...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 18 Jul 2016

Alas, poor Yorick: the spell of Hamlet

The title page of the Hamlet First Quarto On 26 July 1602 Shakespeare’s play Hamlet was registered with the Stationers’ Company in London. It’s an important date, but has done little to settle the burning question of when Shakespeare’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 27 Jul 2015

1814 – The Shakespeare Myths Grow

R. B. Wheler’s manuscript of his Guide to Stratford, 1814.   In 1814 interest in the town of Shakespeare’s birth was growing. An important antiquarian at the time was Robert Bell Wheler who published ‘A Guide to Stratford-upon-Avon’ that...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 27 Jan 2015

Hamlet through Hoops?

Photo: Christoph MullerHamlet, Max Beerbohm famously wrote, is ‘a hoop through which every very eminent actor must, sooner or later, jump.’ By the same token King Lear is a mountain up which every very eminent actor must, sooner or later, climb. Many...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 9 May 2014

Digging for Richard

Photo by Christoph Manuel Mueller Though Shakespeare was not mentioned, there was a manifest and contrived theatricality about the press conference announcing that the skeleton unearthed in a Leicester car park was indeed that of King Richard III. Not...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 13 Feb 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.