The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Education"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Education found 545 posts

Expert Advice: Learn How to Podcast on WordPress.com

Podcasting isn’t just for professional broadcasters or celebrities. If you have a passion for a topic — no matter how niche — and want to explore your options beyond blogging and tweeting, consider launching a podcast! All you need to...
From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 15 Jul 2020

Remembering the First World War

Cynthia Wallace-Casey [This essay is part of a series of contributions to be published over the coming years by members of the research group “Military Service, Citizenship, and Political Culture: Studies of Militias in Atlantic Canada.”...
From: Borealia on 29 Jun 2020

Not Sure How to Get Your Blog Off the Ground? Join Our New Workshop.

Starting a blog is easy and free on WordPress.com. But what if you’re new to blogging? If you need guidance on best practices, actionable tips on how to grow your audience and find inspiration to write, and constructive feedback from experts and...
From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 2 Jun 2020

For students: What’s the point of economic history?

Due to this post, I often get students from all over the world writing me for advice. Today, I got an email from a student. He writes a long email which includes the following, which I copy here with his permission, having only edited it lightly for grammar:...
From: Economic Growth in History on 28 May 2020

Equality & Education for 18C American Girls & Slaves

Anthony Benezet (1713-1784) was a Quaker teacher, writer & strong believer in the equality of women & in the abolition of slavery. He was born to a Huguenot (Protestant) family in France. When he was 2 years old, they moved to London to avoid...
From: 18th-century American Women on 16 May 2020

Expert Advice: Business Fundamentals for Creative Professionals

Are you an artist, photographer, or freelance writer? How about a website designer, master metalsmith, or musician? If you’re in any creative profession and would like to learn more about how to market and sell your services and work online, we’ve...
From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 15 May 2020

Eating Through the Seasons: Food Education in Japan

By Alexis Agliano Sanborn Seasons have been celebrated in Japanese society for centuries through poetry and prose. During the Edo-period (1603-1868) this appreciation of nature codified in the creation of the saijiki, or, poetic seasonal almanacs. These...
From: The Recipes Project on 30 Apr 2020

Salem Doctresses and Doctors

I was watching a rerun of Antiques Roadshow last week when a woman from Ohio presented a wonderful trade sign from the 1830s to folk art dealer Allan Katz: on one side it read “Mrs. Dupler, Female Physician” and on the other “Mrs....
From: streets of salem on 11 Apr 2020

How to Move Your Classes Online — and Charge for Them

We are proud to host many websites for language tutors, yoga schools, and personal fitness coaches around the world. It’s exciting to see how educators and consultants across different industries are getting creative with their online offerings:...
From: Newcastle Early Modern Forum on 26 Mar 2020

Teaching the American Revolution with Simulations

What most Americans know about the Revolutionary War they learned when they were in elementary or middle school. The curricular timing is fortunate in... The post Teaching the American Revolution with Simulations appeared first on Journal of the American...

Writing books as an independent scholar

Here’s one I prepared earlier. It is possible. You just have to be organised. More easily said than done, I know. But many of us are doing it. Writing books as an independent scholar means that nobody pays you for the time you need to research,...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 27 Feb 2020

Cyclone Rep’s Shakespeare Sessions – celebrating 10 years of Theatre-in-Education

Guest report by Edel Carmody, Cyclone Rep Theatre Company  This year marks the tenth anniversary since the creation of Cyclone Rep’s Shakespeare Sessions. Cyclone Rep is Ireland’s leading Shakespearean Theatre-in-Education Company. We...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 19 Feb 2020

Students learn life as 18th century child. Experimental Archaeology.

Students dressed in 18th century clothing making an apple Pomander Ball.More information here: https://www.victoriaadvocate.com/news/education/students-learn-life-as-th-century-child/article_3f315b26-193b-11ea-9cce-2bc03133f052.html
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 10 Dec 2019

A small workshop shows why I like the EU and Brexit is a bad idea

Our Translating Cultures group in the HAB’s Bibelsaal. I have just returned from our annual workshop on Translating Cultures at the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel (HAB, Germany) which is always a great opportunity to catch up with...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 18 Oct 2019

Interview with the ASECS Grad Caucus

I’ve been a member of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) for over thirty years.  I was recently interviewed for the ASECS Graduate Caucus website.  Here’s the link: https://asecsgradcaucus.wordpress.com/2019/10/10/interview-with-dr-anita-guerrini-2018-pfizer-prize-winner-for-the-courtiers-anatomists/ 
From: Anita Guerrini on 11 Oct 2019

What’s In an Ancient Egyptian Makeup Bag?

By Alana Martini, published as part of the Undergraduate Series I have been fascinated by the world of cosmetics for a very long time, and it appears that I am not the only one. Our love affair with cosmetics is almost as old as humanity itself. Large...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Oct 2019

Constructing authentic student textual authority: Teach a text you don’t know

By Christina Riehman-Murphy, Marissa Nicosia, and Heather Froehlich Could a small recipe transcription project make space for student contributions to broader public knowledge? How could we facilitate our students situating themselves as part of a community...
From: The Recipes Project on 26 Sep 2019

Red Thread: A Co-curated Digital Site with Students

By Vera Keller, University of Oregon The Red Thread site grew out of an interdisciplinary, Honors College seminar, Global History of Color. I made colour the focus of a course for four reasons: it intersects with my own research into early modern experimentation...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Sep 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.