The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Eighteenth century"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Eighteenth century found 269 posts

Review, Rebecca Brannon and Joseph Moore, eds. The Consequences of Loyalism

Brannon, Rebecca, and Joseph S. Moore, eds. The Consequences of Loyalism: Essays in Honor of Robert M. Calhoon. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2019). If you are studying or researching Loyalists in some way, Robert M. Calhoon’s...
From: The Junto on 22 Apr 2019

Exploring multilingual digital editions

The Taylor Institution Library recently launched a new course teaching digital editing, with students able to create digital editions in any language of their choice. I was delighted to be able to contribute by designing the accompanying website on which...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 4 Apr 2019

Historic Happenings in Salem

As always, I’m excited for the Salem Film Fest commencing this weekend and running through most of next week, but next weekend will see two big events inspired by Salem’s dynamic 18th-century history: the Resistance Ball at Hamilton Hall...
From: streets of salem on 29 Mar 2019

All Things Georgian: Tales From the Long Eighteenth-Century

We have some exciting news to share with you, our readers, today. As well as writing our bi-weekly blog posts, we have also been working on our fourth book together… and this one is based on our blog! In fact, we’ve reused the name, and the...
From: All Things Georgian on 26 Mar 2019

‘Used With Constant Success’: Animal Ingredients in Eighteenth-Century Remedies, and their Success in the Beauty Industry

It’s Halloween, so it’s fitting that I’m writing about slimes and sticky oozes, though somewhat misleading. This post considers three common animal-derived medicinal ingredients found in eighteenth-century recipes. Earlier this week,...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Oct 2018

The ‘Beccaria moment’: revisiting the origins of the modern penal system

Published anonymously in Livorno in July 1764, Cesare Beccaria’s On Crimes and Punishments is at the origin of a remarkable moment in European culture. Translations and commentaries appeared instantly in several languages, and this brief...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 18 Sep 2018

Another new ECF virtual issue launches today: it’s on...

Another new ECF virtual issue launches today: it’s on the apropos topic of propaganda, curated and with an introduction by Rachel K. Carnell, Cleveland State U. http://ecf.humanities.mcmaster.ca/propaganda/ #18thcentury #readecf #18thcenturyfakenews...

Green Wigs? Ecology and the Long Eighteenth Century

The following post is reblogged from Liverpool University Press. The author, Denys Van Renen, is Associate Professor of English at the University of Nebraska at Kearney. He is the author of ‘The Other Exchange: Women, Servants, and the Urban Underclass...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 28 Aug 2018

The American Farmer in the Eighteenth Century: A Social and Cultural History

Book Review: The American Farmer in the Eighteenth Century: A Social and Cultural History by Richard L. Bushman (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, May... The post The American Farmer in the Eighteenth Century: A Social and Cultural History appeared...

Voltaire on death

The following post is reblogged from Oxford University Press. The author, Alyssa Russell, is a marketing manager at OUP on the Global Online Products and Academic/Trade teams. Voltaire, the French Enlightenment writer, historian, and philosopher,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 7 Aug 2018

Translating Cultures in Early Modern Europe – What’s Next?

Myriam-Isabelle Ducroq (Paris), Thomas Munck (Glasgow) and Gaby Mahlberg (Berlin) (from left). Sometimes a workshop is only a workshop, and sometimes it is the beginning of a whole new project. With the recent Translating Cultures event held at the Herzog...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 4 Aug 2018

Part of the Long History of Child Trafficking: 18th-Century French Louisiana

As we continue to learn more about the seizure and internment of migrant infants and children, both along the U.S.-Mexico border and in ICE raids throughout the nation, historians have asked us to wrestle with our long history of child-snatching, family...
From: The Junto on 27 Jun 2018

À la faveur de la nuit: rethinking night and pleasure in the Age of Enlightenment

Pierre-Antoine Baudouin, Les Heures du jour: La nuit, ca. 1778, gouache on paper, 25.9 x 20 cm, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The protection afforded by the night to lovers is more than a recurrent theme in literature. It is a cliché:...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 12 Jun 2018

The monster of Kirkthorp

Stories of monstrous birth were popular in early modern England. Lots of historians have analysed the materials produced about these children and shown that the meanings attached to them changed over time. In the sixteenth century people interpreted them...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 16 May 2018

Fetch Me at Pearl Nest Street: Rhubarb Pills as Panacea in Qing China

He Bian In the late eighteenth century, American ginseng opened up a new niche market in Qing China. At the same time, Chinese rhubarb (dahuang) roots, harvested from the northwest regions of the empire, were transported by Chinese traders all the way...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 May 2018

Mary Hicks Witch of Huntingdon

On 28 July 1716 Mary Hicks was condemned at the Huntingdon assizes for witchcraft and executed. According to the published narrative of her case, Mary dwelt in Huntingdon with her husband Edward and their 9-year-old daughter Elizabeth, the ‘Aple...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 11 Apr 2018

Making and Consuming Perfume in Eighteenth-Century England

Dr William Tullett asks why manuscript recipes for perfumes were on the decline in the eighteenth century, and investigates the role of the senses in perfume making. A survey of the vast collection in the Wellcome library suggests that the presence...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Apr 2018

Translating Cultures – Workshop at the Duke August Library, 26/27 June

An eighteenth-century German edition of Algernon Sidney’s Discourses Concerning Government (1683) If you are an early modernist interested in translation, print and the book trade in Europe and you can make it to Wolfenbüttel this summer, drop...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 16 Mar 2018

A Dubious Death

Over the past couple of weeks I have been reading through some of the correspondence of the Radcliffe Family, who lived in Hitchin in the eighteenth century. One case has been copied out of the notes of Sir Hans Sloane, a successful medical practitioner...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 17 Jan 2018

Under the Mistletoe

Christmas is drawing ever closer and people are decorating their homes, soon, I’m sure, we will start to see sprigs of mistletoe hanging from door frames. We all know that two people under the mistletoe are supposed to kiss. But in the early modern...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 19 Dec 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.