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Search Results for "Eighteenth-Century"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Eighteenth-Century found 272 posts

Eighteenth-century studies, Besterman and Voltaire

Edinburgh castle. Edinburgh welcomed dix-huitiémistes this year for the fifteenth ISECS congress. The Voltaire Foundation’s newest staff member, who joined in April 2019, experienced ISECS for the first time and was impressed by the strong...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 22 Aug 2019

Imperial letters don’t burn

“Burn my letters so that they will not be printed in my lifetime” – Catherine the Great wrote these words to one of her most trusted correspondents, Friedrich Melchior Grimm, in 1787. Note the caveat – Catherine did not really...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 15 Aug 2019

Human Waste and Wasted Humans: Flotsam and Jetsam in the Anthropocene

Slaves in the Hold of the Albanoz (1846) by Lt. Francis Meynell © National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London Shortly after midnight on March 18, 1973, the Zoe Colocotroni, an oil tanker commissioned by Mobil Oil Company, ran aground off the southwest...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 8 Jul 2019

Brexit, Corbyn, Anything but History: The Way People Talk About Poldark

“I fought for our liberty. For our hopes. For our dreams. And I’ll keep on fighting. Whatever the cost.” These words were first broadcast in 2016. They were spoken by Ross Poldark, shot in extreme close up, interspersed with images of...

'An Extempore Invitation to the Earl of Oxford, Lord High Treasurer. 1712.' - Matthew Prior

‘If weary’d with the great Affairs, Which Britain trusts to Harley’s Cares,Thou, humble Statesman, may’st descend,Thy Mind one Moment to unbend.’ ‘An Extempore Invitation to the Earl of Oxford, Lord High Treasurer....

All Things Georgian: Tales From the Long Eighteenth-Century

We have some exciting news to share with you, our readers, today. As well as writing our bi-weekly blog posts, we have also been working on our fourth book together… and this one is based on our blog! In fact, we’ve reused the name, and the...
From: All Things Georgian on 26 Mar 2019

A born-digital edition of Voltaire’s Dialogue entre un brahmane et un jésuite

Just as the print edition of the Œuvres Complètes de Voltaire is fast approaching its completion, we at the Voltaire Foundation are starting work on two new, highly ambitious digital projects thanks to the generosity of the Andrew W. Mellon...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 21 Mar 2019

“Our Habitation Becomes a Paradise”: Dreaming about Health in the Anthropocene

Before the species-ending plague, the characters in Mary Shelley’s novel The Last Man (1826) dream of a world without disease.  Early in the first volume, Adrian—only son of England’s final reigning monarch—argues that, here...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 12 Mar 2019

Spanish Panels at the ASECS Conference: Denver, March 21-23 2019

These are the panels of interest to us at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, held in Denver, March 21-23, 2019: Thursday 11:30 am-1:00 pm 36. The Black Legend in the Eighteenth Century I [Ibero-American Society...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 28 Feb 2019

The New Volcanoes of Industry

Over the past forty years or so, climate researchers have written of the “human volcano” when discussing air pollution and carbon emissions.  As early as the 1970s, industrialized nations were spewing so much soot and ash into the atmosphere...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 22 Feb 2019

The Humanist World of Voltaire’s Correspondence

We know from reading Voltaire’s letters that he likes quoting – French literature in abundance, but also a fair amount of Latin. There is often a strong sense that he is quoting from memory, which is more than likely the lasting mark of his...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 7 Feb 2019

From catechisms to Voltaire: Religious tradition and change in eighteenth-century novels

Scholars of the Enlightenment have tended – like intellectual historians generally – to stress the movement’s newness, rather than its continuities with the past. Yet these continuities are many, and none are so little explored, perhaps...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 29 Jan 2019

'The Woman of Colour: A Tale' (1808) - Anon

‘…this was evidently meant to mortify your Olivia; it was blending her with the poor negro slaves of the West Indies! It was meant to show her, that, in Mrs. Merton’s idea, there was no distinction between us—you will believe...

'A Nocturnal Reverie' - Anne Finch

‘In such a Night let Me abroad remain, Till Morning breaks, and All's confus'd again;Our Cares, our Toils, our Clamours are renew'd. Or Pleasures, seldom reach'd, again pursu'd.‘A Nocturnal Reverie’ (published 1713)Anne Finch, Countess...

'The Banished Man' - Charlotte Smith

‘In losing every thing but my honour and my integrity, I have learned, that he who retains those qualities can never be degraded, however humble may be his fortune.’The Banished Man (1794)Charlotte Smith (1749-1806)If you’ve heard of...

In search of lost rhymes

Volume 84 of the Œuvres complètes de Voltaire (to be published next year by the Voltaire Foundation) includes a section containing a large number of poems that have at one time or another been attributed to Voltaire. Many are clearly not...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 13 Dec 2018

'Saturday' - Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

‘How am I changed! alas! how am I grownA frightful spectre, to myself unknown!’‘Saturday’ (published 1747)Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762)Portrait of Lady Mary WortleyMontagu by Johnathan Richardson,1725 (held at Sandon Hall,...

The Newberry French Revolution Collection at ARTFL

As we begin planning Digitizing Enlightenment IV, which will take place in the context of the ISECS Congress in Edinburgh in July 2019, we are keen to broaden the scope and breadth of the Digitizing Enlightenment community in order to highlight new, and...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 6 Dec 2018

‘Garden centres must become the Jacobin Clubs of the new Revolution’

Must they? Ian Hamilton Finlay is the author of this startling command. It is one of his Detached Sentences on Gardening (1980-1998): Finlay was a concrete poet and artist who developed a now-renowned garden by the name of Little Sparta, just to the south...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 20 Nov 2018

Remembering the Unbearable Present: Colonial Biowarfare, Indigeneity, and the Challenge for Anthropocene Historiographies

“Anthropocene Word Cloud from Wikipedia.”  Notably, the words colonial, imperial, indigenous, violence, and their derivatives do not appear.   “It is hard for us to examine our connection with unbearable pasts with which we...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 19 Nov 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.