The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Elbridge Gerry"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Elbridge Gerry found 21 posts

Why Do We Pronounced “Gerrymander” with a Soft G?

The story of the gerrymander is well known. In 1812, the Massachusetts General Court drew a state senate district that collected the large south Essex County towns of Marblehead and Salem and then snaked up through Andover and along the northern...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jul 2019

“Paul Revere never made the midnight ride”?

A lot of legend grew up around the American Revolution in the late 1800s, and Henry W. Longfellow’s poem “Paul Revere’s Ride” made the events of 18-19 Apr 1775 especially famed and susceptible to mythologizing.In the early 1900s...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Apr 2019

Marblehead Resistance Walking Tour, 10 May

On Wednesday, 10 May, and twice more at the end of the month, Judy Anderson of Marblehead Architecture Heritage will lead a walking tour of Marblehead focusing on the events of 1774 and 1775. At that time, Marblehead was the second-largest town in Massachusetts,...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 May 2017

When Henry Knox Came Back to Cambridge

On Thursday, 25 January 1776, John Adams and Elbridge Gerry were on their way back to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia. The two Massachusetts delegates stopped at midday to dine in Framingham.Adams wrote in his diary:Coll. [Joseph] Buckminster...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Jan 2017

John Adams Views Trumbull”s Painting of the Congress

In 1818 the Revolutionary War veteran and painter John Trumbull came to Boston to exhibit his depiction of the Continental Congress considering the Declaration of Independence.Josiah Quincy, son of the Patriot lawyer of the same name, was then between...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Oct 2016

Madison in Massachusetts, 7 and 21 October

On Friday, 7 October, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host Kyle Jenks in the person of President James Madison, looking back on the criticisms of the U.S. Constitution from Massachusetts delegate Elbridge Gerry.Gerry was at the Constitutional...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Oct 2016

The Tale of Benjamin Harrison and Elbridge Gerry’s Signatures

In its description of the Continental Congress’s main signing of the Declaration of Independence on 2 Aug 1776, the Course of Human Events blog listed “a number of quotations from the signing for which we have no evidence.” Among them...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Aug 2016

The Standing Member from Massachusetts

Before leaving that day when the Constitutional Convention debated whether the size of the U.S. Army in peacetime mattered, I want to address another tradition that’s arisen about it.Several recent books (e.g., Isaacson, Chernow, Beschloss,...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Jul 2016

“He would produce a better one”

In investigating the anecdote about George Washington’s whisper at the Constitutional Convention, I started to wonder about the political views of Maryland delegate John Francis Mercer. Mercer arrived at the Philadelphia convention on 6 Aug 1787....
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jul 2016

“The army shall not consist of more than — thousand men”

When John Francis Mercer arrived late at the Constitutional Convention on 6 Aug 1787, he was only twenty-eight years old—the second youngest man there. But he wasn’t shy about speaking up.The day after Mercer signed in, James Madison’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jul 2016

Patrick Henry’s Gerrymandering

Elizabeth Kolbert’s New Yorker essay “Drawing the Line,” a review of David Daley’s new book on modern computer-aided gerrymandering, starts out with this snatch of early Virginia politics:Sometime around October 20, 1788, Patrick...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jul 2016

“The Regiments be immediately settled”

Yesterday I examined how the transition from militia to Massachusetts army looked like from a private’s perspective. Here’s a view from the top.Under New England’s militia system, most men in a community were supposed to turn out in...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 May 2016

Mad about the Massachusetts Historical Society’s Collections

The Massachusetts Historical Society is celebrating its 225th anniversary this year with, among other things, this online exhibit of 225 notable objects from its collection. Those objects don’t appear to include the broadside titled “Wolfe’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Feb 2016

The Juntocast Tackles the Bill of Rights

For folks interested in the recent postings on the genesis of the U.S. Bill of Rights, I recommend the latest podcast discussion from the Junto, released last weekend.Ken Owen, Michael Hattem, and Roy Rogers discuss the development of those amendments...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jan 2016

The Father of the Bill of Rights

If we Google “Father of the Bill of Rights,” the name that pops up more than any other is George Mason of Virginia.It’s true that ExplorePAHistory says of Robert Whitehill, “it is not too much of an exaggeration to call him the...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jan 2016

Jeremiah Lee’s Very Bad Night

Jeremiah Lee was a non-battlefield casualty of the fight on 18-19 Apr 1775. On the one hand, that’s appropriate because he was central to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s effort to build up an artillery force, which prompted the British...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Apr 2015

The Second Amendment’s Historic Moment

In considering the Second Amendment, I think it’s valuable to recognize the unusual historical moment in which it was enacted.Whig political philosophy had long warned against a large “standing army”—i.e., the sort of military we now have—as...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 May 2014

“I have myself a large share of malicious Slander”

When James Warren wrote to Elbridge Gerry on 20 July 1788, the two political allies were digesting the legal ratification of the new U.S. Constitution, which they had opposed.Warren and his wife Mercy had just moved out of the mansion in Milton where...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Feb 2013

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.