The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Elizabethan"

Showing 1 - 20 of 131

Your search for posts with tags containing Elizabethan found 131 posts

The House of Dudley by Joanne Paul

As the nine-year-old Edward VI rode through London on the way to his coronation in Westminster Abbey in February 1547, he paused for a while to watch a man perform on a tightrope strung from the steeple of St Paul’s. He might have been advised to study...
From: Mathew Lyons on 4 May 2022

News: Not Just The Tudors

I’m delighted to have recorded another episode for Suzannah Lipscomb’s brilliant podcast, Not Just the Tudors, this time on Sir Walter Ralegh and the tragic fantasy of El Dorado. It’s available to listen to here. My previous episode, in which we...
From: Mathew Lyons on 2 May 2022

Galatea 101: Performing John Lyly in the 21st Century

Galatea (c.1584) enjoyed some more research and development with actors in August 2021, as it heads towards a production in collaboration with Wildworks, when director Emma Frankland gathered theatremakers at the 101 Outdoor Creation Space (thanks to...
From: Before Shakespeare on 20 Sep 2021

Luke Hutton’s “Black Dogge of Newgate” (1596) | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK. Spanish Origins During the sixteenth century a new genre of popular literature arrived in England. Adapted from literature that was flourishing in Spain, a stream of printed books...

Galatea 101 #3

Bea Webster talks about the process of turning sixteenth-century English into British Sign Language and the creation of appropriate signs, the importance of a diverse rehearsal room, and what it’s like playing a character about to be sacrificed… Part...
From: Before Shakespeare on 19 Aug 2021

Galatea 101 #

Nadia Nadarajah and Brian Duffy tell us about their experiences working on the play Galatea, including translations into British Sign Language, exploring the character of the goddess Diana, and using physical communication and visual vernacular. The work...
From: Before Shakespeare on 19 Aug 2021

Galatea

This week and next, Galatea is back on its feet once more! Now heading towards a production in collaboration with Wildworks, director and theatremaker Emma Frankland has gathered theatremakers at the 101 Outdoor Creation Space (made possible thanks to...
From: Before Shakespeare on 18 Aug 2021

“Flaneuring” through a morning: more research joys

It has been so long since I posted here I couldn’t figure out how to do it. My last post was at the end of October of last year, so close to six months ago. It feels more like a year to me, in part because of our molassas-slow new reality. That...
From: Baroque Explorations on 27 Apr 2021

The guilt, angst and joy of research

I recently read an article by the elusive Ryan Holiday, a professional book researcher. He made one very important point—at least to me. He said that the first step in researching is to acquire a research library which will include books that...
From: Baroque Explorations on 31 Oct 2020

The sixteenth-century Vasquine / Basquine: A corset, farthingale or Kirtle?

In her 2001 book The Corset: A Cultural History Valerie Steele claimed that vasquines and basquines were early types of corsets: “The other precursor of the corset was the basquine or vasquine, a laced bodice to which was attached a hooped skirt...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 28 Oct 2020

Talk: Body-makers and Farthingale-makers in Seventeenth-Century London

Hot on the heels on my talk on whalebone and early modern fashion, I recently gave another presentation about the work I’ve been doing on farthingale-makers and body-makers in late sixteenth and seventeenth-century London. This paper was given at...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 3 Sep 2020

Whalebone and Sixteenth Century Fashion

Recently I gave a talk on the use of whale baleen (otherwise known as whalebone) in fashion in sixteenth-century Europe, particularly England. The talk was recorded and is now online via the University of Melbourne Early Modern Circle website. Click on...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 20 Aug 2020

“The Life and Death of Jacke Straw” (1593)

By Stephen Basdeo The following is an excerpt from my book: The Life and Legend of a Rebel Leader: Wat Tyler (2018). It is available to buy from the publisher here: Link. Wat Tyler’s rebellion in 1381 was the first large-scale uprising of the common...

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 | Part Five: Finishing the Rebato

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part One: Brief History and Materials Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Two: The Pattern Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Three: Making the Wire Frame Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Four: Making the Linen Collar Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Five: Finishing...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 13 May 2020

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 | Part Four: Making the Linen Collar

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part One: Brief History and Materials Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Two: The Pattern Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Three: Making the Wire Frame Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Four: Making the Linen Collar Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Five: Finishing...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 12 May 2020

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 | Part Four: Making the Linen Collar

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part One: Brief History and Materials Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Two: The Pattern Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Three: Making the Wire Frame Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Four: Making the Linen Collar Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Five: Finishing...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 12 May 2020

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 | Part Three: Making the Wire Frame

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part One: Brief History and Materials Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Two: The Pattern Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Three: Making the Wire Frame Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Four: Making the Linen Collar Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Five: Finishing...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 11 May 2020

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 | Part Three: Making the Wire Frame

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part One: Brief History and Materials Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Two: The Pattern Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Three: Making the Wire Frame Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Four: Making the Linen Collar Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Five: Finishing...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 11 May 2020

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 | Part Two: The Pattern

Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part One: Brief History and Materials Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Two: The Pattern Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Three: Making the Wire Frame Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Four: Making the Linen Collar Rebato, c. 1600-1625 Part Five: Finishing...
From: Sarah A Bendall on 10 May 2020

Page 1 of 7123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.