The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Empire"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Empire found 294 posts

Mary Wollstonecraft and the Question of French Character

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitled “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.” By Megan Gallagher In his masterwork of comparative political thought, The Spirit of the Laws (1748), Montesquieu had observed that “if there were...
From: Age of Revolutions on 18 Oct 2021

Victor Hugo’s Early Modern Outlaw Play: “Hernani” (1830)

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and lecturer based in Leeds, UK. He researches the life and works of several British and French ‘mysteries’ authors including George W.M. Reynolds, Pierce Egan the Younger, Eugene Sue, and Victor Hugo. He is also currently...

Slavery, Capitalism, and the Industrial Revolution: Sweet Industriousness and the Role of the Sugar Economy

In this lecture, co-organised with the Sheffield Centre for Early Modern Studies and delivered in-person at the University of Sheffield on 7 October, Professor Maxine Berg (University of Warwick) previews material from her new book – co-authored with...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 11 Oct 2021

John Beaumont’s Boudicca (1647) | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK. This post is adapted from recent research conducted into early modern cultural portrayals of British imperialism. Introduction British popular culture’s relationship with imperialism...

Virtual Rome

My students in HIST 420 The Renaissance at Northern Illinois University recently discussed the intellectual movement of Humanism in the Renaissance, focusing especially on the Humanists’ fascination with antiquities and their nostalgia for ancient Rome....

The Janissary and Massacre of the Christians (1850) [Part 2] | G. W. M. Reynolds

The following short story was written by George W.M. Reynolds and published in two instalments in Reynolds’s Miscellany during 1850. Set in the 1300s, at a time when Ottoman forces were making inroads into Europe, it tells the story of Sisman, a young...

The Janissary and Massacre of the Christians (1850) | G. W. M. Reynolds

The following short story was written by George W.M. Reynolds and published in two instalments in Reynolds’s Miscellany during 1850. Set in the 1300s, at a time when Ottoman forces were making inroads into Europe, it tells the story of Sisman, a young...

The death of Atahualpa, the last emperor of the Incas

In the late afternoon of 26 July 1533, Atahualpa, last true emperor of the Incas, was led out into the public square of Cajamarca a city in the Andean highlands, now in northern Peru. His conquistador captors, led by Francisco Pizarro, had just decided...
From: Mathew Lyons on 5 Aug 2021

Geckos, Environmental History, and the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade

Historians are collaborating with scientists in new ways these days, especially in the growing field of environmental history. Scholars are making new and fascinating discoveries about the long history of human transformations of environments. Historians...

A Lay from the Trenches: A Poem of the Crimean War (1855) | P. J. Questel

‘A Lay from the Trenches’ was a poem, written in 1855, by a soldier serving in the Crimean War. It was first published in the London Journal and has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo.[1] We have the vigour yet, That nerv’d our sires of yore:...

Victorian Killer Snakes | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. The British Empire (Stephen Basdeo Personal Collection) Introduction During the days of the British Empire, colonial officers and civil servants enjoyed hunting wild animals: tigers,...

Join, or Die: Why Did It Have to Be Snakes?

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By J....
From: Age of Revolutions on 5 Jul 2021

The Nineteenth-Century Coffee Commodity Chain: Representation and Reality

In the first part of my PhD thesis, I explored how Douwe Egberts, one of the largest Dutch producers of coffee and tea, used images of factories and cultivation landscapes in their advertising campaigns between 1900 and 1950. By applying the semiotic...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 1 Jul 2021

George W.M. Reynolds’s Exposure of Army Brutality | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK, and in this post he examines G.W.M. Reynolds’s novel The Soldier’s Wife (1852-53). First issue of G.W.M. Reynolds’s The Soldier’s Wife (personal collection) The radical novelist...

Brave Canadians! (1839) | S.R.G.

This song was originally written by someone known only by their initials “S.R.G.” and was included Hugh Williams’s National Songs and Poetical Pieces (1838), a radical, pro-Chartist poetry collection. The song itself is written in commemoration...

Painting a Pandemic: Napoleon Visiting the Sick

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. He has published books and articles on various subjects including the history of crime, radicalism, and socialism. Antoine-Jean Gros, Bonaparte visitant les pestiférés de Jaffa. 1804....

To Canaris, the Greek Patriot

Written by Victor Hugo and translated by G.W.M. Reynolds (“Canaris! nous t’avons oublié.”)[1] [Kanaris! We forgot you!] {VIII., October, 1832.} O Canaris! O Canaris! the poet’s song Has blameful left untold thy deeds too long!...

Diversity in Historical Re-enactments

Colonial Williamsburg, one of the most important sites for historical re-enactment in the United States, is increasingly stressing diversity issues in its historical interpretations of colonial American society. The community of Williamsburg, Virginia,...

Red Meat for Empire: New England Cattle, the British Empire, and the Disruption of Revolution

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Strother...
From: Age of Revolutions on 24 May 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.