The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Empire"

Showing 81 - 100 of 263

Your search for posts with tags containing Empire found 263 posts

A Fashionable Neoclassical Dress, 1800-1805

This formal dress, c. 1800-1805, of white cotton gauze, features small floral sprays across the textile. It is detailed with a border design “composed of vine and a modified Greek fret worked in a chain stitch with fine red and white wool.”  This...
From: SilkDamask on 7 Nov 2018

Mapping the End of Empire

Jeffers Lennox [This is the seventh essay of the Borealia series on Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.] If we accept the argument that maps helped...
From: Borealia on 7 Nov 2018

Absence Makes the Art. Go Ponder.

[This is the sixth essay of the Borealia series on Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  Alan MacEachern The following post may not suit a scholarly...
From: Borealia on 31 Oct 2018

L’île aux démons: cartographie d’un mirage

[This is the fifith essay of the Borealia series on Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  Alban Berson On serait bien en peine de pointer sur une...
From: Borealia on 24 Oct 2018

Free Communities of Color in the Revolutionary Caribbean

By Robert D. Taber and Charlton W. Yingling The tumult of the Age of Atlantic Revolutions provided new opportunities for people of color in the Caribbean, and recent scholarship has emphasized remarkable individuals who pursued their freedom and respectability...
From: Age of Revolutions on 22 Oct 2018

True Interests: Environmental History and National Ambition (Or, Let’s Squish Canada)

[This is the fourth essay of the Borealia series Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  Claire Campbell Borders have been in the news these past...
From: Borealia on 17 Oct 2018

Afro-Atlantic Histories

A massive art exhibition on Afro-Atlantic Histories recently opened at the São Paulo Museum of Art (MASP) in São Paulo, Brazil. The exhibition includes early modern, modern, and contemporary artworks depicting Afro-Americans and their experiences...

Early-Modern Place Names in Today’s Canada

Lauren Beck The Geographic Names Board of Canada (GNBC) provides scholars with a database of place names that allows users to look up the location of a place name, but that’s about all the information one can glean from this utility. The provinces...
From: Borealia on 10 Oct 2018

Q&A with L.H. Roper

Today at The Junto, L.H. Roper, professor of history at the State University of New York at New Paltz and coeditor in chief of the Journal of Early American History, joins us to discuss his new book, Advancing Empire: English Interest in Overseas Expansion,...
From: The Junto on 4 Oct 2018

La cartographie des routes impériales françaises: le cas du fleuve Saint-Laurent au XVIIIe siècle

Çà et là, l’historiographie a rappelé le rôle singulier de la cartographie pratiquée dans un contexte colonial : offrir des connaissances géographiques aux dirigeants qui souhaitent asseoir leur...
From: Borealia on 3 Oct 2018

Portuguese Shipwreck Found

Marine archaeologists are exploring the site of an early modern Portuguese shipwreck. NPR reports that “A 400-year-old shipwreck that signified a time when the spice trade between Portugal and India was booming has been uncovered 40 feet below...

Mapping Land Tenure Pluralism in the St. Lawrence River Valley

Julia Lewandoski [This essay kicks off a Borealia series on Cartography and Empire-on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.]  After the 1763 Peace of Paris, British officials embarked...
From: Borealia on 26 Sep 2018

New KE&PU Podcast: Adrian Masters, “Petition & Response: Spanish America & the Council of the Indies”

Adrian Masters, “Petition and Response: Spanish America and the Council of the Indies in the 16th Century,” on Kingdom, Empire, and Plus Ultra with Edward Collins.
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 22 Aug 2018

HEAT! A Recipes Project Thematic Series

As humans, we want to control heat. We want to create heat, temper or even extinguish it, depending on context and purpose. We have a very limited temperature range at which we are comfortable (some microbes and bacteria can survive temperatures as low...
From: The Recipes Project on 1 Aug 2018

“A curious font of porphyry”

Working on material culture, my research has taken me to some interesting, if unexpected places. Last summer, it involved waiting outside Saint John’s Church in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, founded in 1732 as the Anglican Queen’s Chapel. I quickly...
From: The Junto on 12 Jul 2018

Recovering Refugees from 1794 Toulouse to Today

ByJoshua Meeks One of the seemingly inevitable outcomes of any revolutionary period is the creation of refugees. We are reminded of this daily with news of the ongoing refugee crisis in the Mediterranean, as thousands of persecuted or forgotten migrants...
From: Age of Revolutions on 2 Jul 2018

Book Raffle: Church’s Paradise Destroyed

Christopher M. Church Paradise Destroyed: Catastrophe and Citizenship in the French Caribbean. University of Nebraska Press, 2017. In conjunction with the the University of Nebraska Press and Christopher M. Church, Age of Revolutions is...
From: Age of Revolutions on 29 Jun 2018

Perpetual Motion: Fantasies of Technology, Slavery, and History

Once we stop thinking of the past as a failed but noble attempt at the present, many of its inexplicable, repulsive, or ridiculous aspects take on a new colour. A good example is alchemical transmutation, an evident impossibility that nevertheless occupied...
From: memorious on 24 Jun 2018

Q&A with Daniel Livesay, author of Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833

Daniel Livesay is Associate Professor of History at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, CA.  His research focuses on questions of race, slavery, and family in the colonial Atlantic World. His first book, Children of Uncertain Fortune:...
From: The Junto on 20 Apr 2018

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.