The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "England"

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Your search for posts with tags containing England found 1345 posts

From Dressmaker to Body Snatcher

One thing we have concluded about ourselves during our research over the years is, that we have an incredible propensity for being dragged, kicking and screaming off at tangents and this one is a case in point. How on earth is it possible to get from...
From: All Things Georgian on 10 Dec 2019

A Murder at Fleet Prison

We begin this story, which only just made it onto our radar, with two gentlemen – Lewis Pleura, who was born in Italy and referred to himself by the title of Count, and who was very fond of gambling, and as such, eventually found his way into Fleet...
From: All Things Georgian on 3 Dec 2019

18th Century Recipes for a 21st Century Thanksgiving

Every November,  scores of American families sit down to Thanksgiving dinner, a tradition followed for almost 400 years in the New World. The main dish of this celebratory feast is a turkey, stuffed and roasted to perfection. In the 18th century,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 28 Nov 2019

Tales from the Archives: To Make a Fine Apple Pye

It’s cold, wet and rather miserable in the UK at the moment. Fortunately, the Christmas lights bring some good cheer, as does lovely late-autumn food. My favourite autumnal dish is the apple-crumble, with its perfect balance of sweetness and tartness....
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Nov 2019

The Week on Dispatches: Roberto Oscar Flores de Apodaca on Prayer and Thanksgiving of the Common Soldier

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews PhD student Roberto Oscar Flores de Apodaca on recovering the religious life of the common soldier through... The post The Week on Dispatches: Roberto Oscar Flores de Apodaca on Prayer...

“the higher the pyramid of hair . . . the more fashionable”

In the middle of the eighteenth century, women with the wealth to indulge in the latest styles took to wearing not only “high hair,” created by adding rolls and padding, but also headdresses that included constructions atop the head or as...
From: In the Words of Women on 20 Nov 2019

Lack of Foresight – Fortune Telling

We have previously written about fortune telling, a matter which was very popular during the Georgian era, so today we have a couple of short stories to share with you on the subject. In April 1801 John Rowe was indicted for defrauding Sarah Hall of the...
From: All Things Georgian on 19 Nov 2019

Around the Table: Events

By Sarah Peters Kernan Two weeks ago the Early Modern Recipes Online Collective (EMROC) hosted their fifth annual Transcribathon. I want to share my Transcribathon experience at the site hosted by the Newberry Library in Chicago, as I learned this event...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Nov 2019

November 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (November 18, 1769). “Containing, an accurate Ephemeris … Containing likewise, a beautiful Poem …” In the fall of 1769, John Carter...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Nov 2019

“then my Lad you Swing”

On route to London from Deal, where the passengers from the ship Active were put ashore, ABIGAIL ADAMS describes an encounter with a highwayman in the journal she is intending to send to her sister MARY CRANCH. From Chatham we proceeded, on our way as...
From: In the Words of Women on 5 Nov 2019

November 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (November 4, 1769). “To be Sold … by the several Merchants and Shopkeepers of Providence and Newport.” John Carter continued to advertise the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Nov 2019

“from Deal to London which is 72 miles”

Though intended to be the account of an ocean voyage by ABIGAIL ADAMS to London in 1788, I can’t resist allowing Abigail to describe the highlights of her journey after the passengers were put ashore at Deal. There she and the other passengers take...
From: In the Words of Women on 31 Oct 2019

A Leicestershire Murder in 1815

Abraham Billson, a pig farmer, married Ann Tibbs at Broughton Astley on 24th November 1812. The couple went on to have four children, the eldest Jonathan Tibbs (taking his mother’s maiden name) was born nearly a year after their marriage, but who...
From: All Things Georgian on 29 Oct 2019

October 28

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (October 28, 1769). “THE NEW-ENGLAND ALMANACK.” John Carter wanted prospective customers to know that he had “JUST PUBLISHED” the “NEW-ENGLAND...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Oct 2019

“. . . I have Safely landed upon the British coast.”

In July of 1784, ABIGAIL ADAMS was nearly at the end of her journey across the Atlantic to London where she was to join her husband John. As readers who have been following her story will appreciate, it was a fraught passage. The vessel finally arrived...
From: In the Words of Women on 26 Oct 2019

Jane Scott, The Preston Poisoner

On the bitterly cold morning of Saturday 22nd March 1828, a twenty two year old woman sat in her prison cell at Lancaster Castle, awaiting the hangman’s noose, with just the long standing prison chaplain, Reverend Mr Joseph Rowley to comfort her...
From: All Things Georgian on 17 Oct 2019

The story of Old London Bridge, the iconic landmark which vanished from the capital’s skyline

A reconstruction drawing of London Bridge in about 1590 by Stephen Conlin, specially commissioned for Country Life. Credit: Stephen Conlin.More Here: https://www.countrylife.co.uk/architecture/living-thames-history-london-bridge-one-celebrated-lost-landmarks-205294
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 15 Oct 2019

Medical Use of Honey in the 17th & 18th centuries. Documentation.

18th Century Medicinal Uses for Honey. ‘A poultis for a Swelling by My Aunt Dorothy Pates’, for example, used honey as a binding agent. Another recipe, said to be ‘approved by the best doctars [sic]’ used a clove of garlic...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 3 Oct 2019

September 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-Hampshire Gazette (September 29, 1769). “TO BE SOLD … a NEGRO MAN, that understand the Rope-making Business.” “What can we learn about the experiences...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Sep 2019

The Burning Church

For the last month, it seems like whenever I engaged in any form of social media I found myself looking at a primitive painting of a burning church. This image, by the nineteenth-century British expat artist John Hilling (1822-1894), who worked in Massachusetts...
From: streets of salem on 23 Sep 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.