The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Environmental History"

Showing 1 - 20 of 93

Your search for posts with tags containing Environmental History found 93 posts

Upcoming Programs from the Marblehead Museum

The Marblehead Museum’s upcoming online events include two about the Revolutionary period.Thursday, 17 September, 7:00 P.M.A Furious Sky: The Five-Hundred-Year History of America’s HurricanesMarblehead author Eric Jay Dolin discusses his new...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Sep 2020

On Social Media: Macbeth

This summer, I have had the great good fortune to contribute to Ian Doescher‘s community reading initiative, the Shakespeare 2020 Project. A website and Facebook group support members of the public with free editions and resources as they read through...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 4 Aug 2020

Hsiung on “The Metabolism of Military Forces,” 10 Mar.

On Tuesday, 10 March, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host a joint session of its Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar and Boston Seminar on Environmental History series.Prof. David Hsiung of Juniata College will present a paper on “The...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Mar 2020

History and the Climate Emergency, Or: Tradition to the rescue of Progress

Olivier Guimond Participating in panels on history and heritage in recent weeks has given me pause to reflect on the relevance of the historical discipline to the climate emergency and climate change. The two events on which these reflections are based...
From: Borealia on 27 Nov 2019

L’histoire et l’urgence climatique, Ou la tradition à la rescousse du progrès

Olivier Guimond L’assistance à quelques panels portant sur l’histoire et le patrimoine dans les dernières semaines m’a donné à réfléchir sur la pertinence de la discipline historique dans un...
From: Borealia on 27 Nov 2019

Chaplin on Climate Recording in Almanacs, 18 Oct.

Joyce Chaplin, Professor of Early American History at Harvard University, is compiling a large database of the notes people kept in their almanacs about the daily weather. On the afternoon of Friday, 18 October, Chaplin will speak on “Climate in...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Oct 2019

Earthquakes and a Volcano in 1783

Early this month the European Geosciences Union shared a blog essay by Katrin Kleemann on Europe’s frightening geological events of 1783:Southern Italy and Sicily experience regular earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. However, the earthquakes of...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Sep 2019

Climate Change Thinking, Then and Now

I decided to take a day off from Charles Adams’s school days today. Instead, here’s a repeat of some comments from eighteenth-century Boston‘s leading scientists on anthropogenic climate change.Many Americans of that period were anxious...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Sep 2019

The First and Ongoing Pauline Maier Seminar Series

The Boston Area Early American History Seminar has changed its name to the Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar, honoring the late M.I.T. professor who was an enthusiast for these discussion and many other ways of delving into the national past.The...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Sep 2019

The Burnings of the Liberty

The Boston Gazette was the town’s staunchest Whig newspaper, quick to attack royal officials and to defend locals against charges of unrest. But printers Edes and Gill weren’t so protective about other communities.The Boston Gazette’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Aug 2019

The Natick Community and the Watertown Dam

Last month the Junto blog shared an interesting essay by Zachary M. Bennett, “Damming Fish and Indians: Starvation and Dispossession in Colonial Massachusetts.”Bennett writes:Compared to other Native Americans in southern New England, the...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jul 2019

Damming Fish and Indians: Starvation and Dispossession in Colonial Massachusetts

Today’s post in the Roundtable on Food and Hunger in Vast Early America is by Zachary M. Bennett, who is Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Connecticut College this autumn. He is a Ph.D. candidate at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. His...
From: The Junto on 18 Jun 2019

Emotional Bodies in Context, a Symposium at The University of Adelaide 

By Meagan Nattrass, The University of Adelaide The Oxford English Dictionary defines the body as ‘the physical structure, including the bones, flesh, and organs, of a person or an animal,’ yet the Emotional Bodies in Context symposium recognised...
From: Histories of Emotion on 14 Jun 2019

Review: Christopher M. Parsons, A Not-So-New World

Carla Cevasco reviews Christopher M. Parsons, A Not-So-New World: Empire and Environment in French Colonial North America
From: The Junto on 28 May 2019

Dr. Franklin and the Volcano

In May 1784, Benjamin Franklin published an essay titled “Meteorological Imaginations and Conjectures.” In it Franklin observed that “the winter of 1783-84, was more severe than any that happened for many years.” Though he was...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 May 2019

Upcoming Events in Charlestown and Weston

Here are a couple of interesting Revolutionary history happenings in the next few days.On Thursday, 25 April, the Bunker Hill Museum will host a talk by Salem Maritime National Historic Site historian Emily Murphy titled “‘I Am An Honest Woman’:...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Apr 2019

Coral, Labor, Slavery, and Silence in the Archives

“Revolutionary Material Culture Series” This series examines the Age of Revolutions through its material markers, reminding us that materials themselves reflected and shaped political cultures around the revolutionary Atlantic and World. By...
From: Age of Revolutions on 22 Apr 2019

More Glimpses from the Lexington Parsonage

Yesterday I quoted the recollections of Dorothy Quincy about her experiences at the Lexington parsonage on 19 Apr 1775, where she was staying as fiancée of John Hancock.As recorded in 1822 by William H. Sumner, the widow Dorothy Scott described...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Apr 2019

“Soon after the fire broke out, he caused his wind to blow”

Given Boston’s religious heritage, the Great Fire of 1760 naturally caused people to ask what God meant by it. On 23 March, the Sunday after the fire, the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew preached about the calamity at the West Meetinghouse. That sermon said...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Feb 2019

The Atlantic World before Jamestown

Professor Peter Mancall will be presenting a lecture on the sixteenth-century Atlantic World at the Newberry Library on Saturday, 2 February 2019 at 10 AM – 11:30 AM. “In the 16th-century Atlantic world, nature and culture swirled in people’s...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.