The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Essex"

Showing 1 - 20 of 224

Your search for posts with tags containing Essex found 224 posts

April 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “It may be had also of Doctor Kast, or Miss Priscilla Manning, at SALEM, and of Mr. Dummer Jewett at IPSWICH.” Daniel Scott operated “the Medicine-Store, at the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Apr 2021

The Privateer’s House

On this very day in 1776, the Continental Congress authorized private vessels commissioned with “Letters of Marque and Reprisal” to “make captures of British Vessels and Cargoes” and Salem’s shipowners and shipmasters responded...
From: streets of salem on 3 Apr 2021

Traders or Traitors? The New Jersey Shop License Law of 178

Following the campaign of 1776, New York City and environs were occupied by British forces. For the rest of the war, George Washington threatened,... The post Traders or Traitors? The New Jersey Shop License Law of 1780 appeared first on Journal of the...

March 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Said Gazette has an extensive Circulation.” In the eighteenth century, some newspaper printers used the colophon on the final page to promote subscriptions and advertising,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Mar 2021

March 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Whoever has a Mind to purchase … by applying to the Printer hereof may know further.” Advertisements for grocery items, an “elegant Assortment of English...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Mar 2021

March 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Gentlemen, in and near Boston, who have signified their Desire of becoming Subscribers.” In 1771, printers in Boston published more newspapers than in any other town...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Mar 2021

March 5

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Sermons on the Death of Mr. WHITEFIELD.” A little more than five months following George Whitefield’s death on September 30, 1770, the commodification of that...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 5 Mar 2021

February 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Subscriptions are taken in by I. Thomas, Printer and Publisher … M.J. Hiller, Watch-maker in Salem.” As Isaiah Thomas prepared to relaunch the Massachusetts...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Feb 2021

Who’s Counting?

I am right on the verge of completing my manuscript for submission to the publisher, but I had to stop because something is bothering me and I need to “write it out”. That process describes quite a few of my blog posts, actually. Last week...
From: streets of salem on 22 Feb 2021

January 29

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Choice Labradore Tea.” Two advertisements in the January 29, 1771, edition of the Essex Gazette promoted tea to colonial consumers.  William Vans advertised “CHOICE...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 29 Jan 2021

January 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A POEM on the Execution of William Shaw.” True crime!  News of the murder of Edward East circulated widely in New England.  The Massachusetts Gazette and...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Jan 2021

December 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The most judicious, sensible and learned Gentlemen … have already subscribed.” Subscription notices were a common form of advertising in early American newspapers. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Dec 2020

December 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “JUST PUBLISHED … Dr. Whitaker’s SERMON On the DEATH of the Reverend George Whitefield.” George Whitefield, one of the most prominent ministers associated...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Dec 2020

Fair Ladies

Columbus is persona non grata these days, of course, but a hundred years ago and more his day was big in Salem and elsewhere, and the Columbian Exposition of 1893 was even bigger. The Essex Institute was charged with furnishing an entire room...
From: streets of salem on 21 Nov 2020

Deviation, Discovery and Donors: my Last Word on the PEM’s Phillips Library

A big week—was there an election?—as the official judgement from the Massachusetts Judicial Court came down regarding the movement of the Phillips Library to a remote Collection Center by the Peabody Essex Museum in response to the latter’s...
From: streets of salem on 5 Nov 2020

Witch City: the Film and the Moment

It seems ridiculous, but when I moved to Salem I remember being surprised at the extent of Halloween hoopla and kitsch in the city: it seemed really tacky to me but not particularly concerning. It was the early 1990s, I was still in graduate school, and...
From: streets of salem on 13 Oct 2020

October 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A Hymn composed by the Rev. Mr. WHITEFIELD, and intended to be sung over his Corps.” George Whitefield, one of the most influential ministers associated with the eighteenth-century...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Oct 2020

October

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Ranaway … a Negro Man, named Jack.” “Elizabeth, my Wife, hath left my Bed and Board.” Interspersed among the advertisements for consumer goods and...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 2 Oct 2020

If You Build it, They will Come

Two very different tourist towns during the Pandemic of 2020: at the beginning of the summer, I was up in my hometown of York, Maine, so I wrote about its opening in the midst of Covid with every intention of writing a comparative “bookend”...
From: streets of salem on 29 Sep 2020

Tragedy amidst the Everyday

I LOVE Diaries: they offer such personal perspectives into the past, encompassing both “big” events and everyday occurrences. I read diaries, teach with diaries, and think about diaries often. I even like books about diaries, such as Kate...
From: streets of salem on 12 Sep 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.