The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Events"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Events found 2257 posts

“Perpetual Memorial” from the Paul Revere House, 5 Mar.

Last March we commemorated the Sestercentennial of the Boston Massacre. There was a big gathering at the Old South Meeting-House with remembrances of each victim. There were book talks and signings. There were many reenactment scenarios around the center...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Feb 2021

“Mentor” Remembers the Massacre

Before February ends, I need to note one event from this month 250 years ago.On 11 Feb 1771, the Fleet brothers’ Boston Evening-Post ran as its first front-page item a letter signed “Mentor.” It recalled the previous year’s Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Feb 2021

Pretty please…

Have you ever attended an EMROC event? Are you planning to attend our transcribathon on 4 March 2021?  If you said yes to either, then please fill in our super-short, anonymous survey so we can get to know a bit more about our community. It takes...
From: emroc on 21 Feb 2021

“The First BIBLE ever printed in America”?

As I quoted yesterday, Isaiah Thomas grew up as an apprentice printer hearing stories about how his master, Zechariah Fowle, had helped to secretly print a New Testament in the late 1740s. Thomas also heard about a complete Bible completed by another...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Feb 2021

Pierre Bayle and the QAnon “Skeptics”

Print made by James Gillray, 1757–1815, British, Published by Hannah Humphrey, ca. 1745–1818, British, The Theatrical Bubble: Being a New Specimen of the Astonishing Powers of the Great Politico-Punchinello, in the art of Dramatic Puffing,...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 7 Feb 2021

A Short Narrative “from the London Edition”?

On 16 July 1770, six days after the Boston town meeting reaffirmed its ban on selling copies of its Short Narrative of the Horrid Massacre locally, this advertisement appeared in the Boston Evening-Post:Next WEDNESDAY will be Published,[from the London...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Feb 2021

“The printed Narratives of the late horred Massacre”

This week I watched an online talk by Robert Darnton about his new book Pirating and Publishing: The Book Trade in the Age of Enlightenment. He described various stratagems printers and booksellers used to get around two stifling forces in ancien régime...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Feb 2021

Debating (Canadian) Presentism: Narrative, Nation, and Macdonald in 2021

Jerry Bannister Like many Canadian historians, I have followed with interest the ongoing debate over John A. Macdonald, including the recent letter sponsored by the Macdonald-Laurier Institute. Among the thoughtful responses to the letter, I’d highlight...
From: Borealia on 2 Feb 2021

The Problem of Legacy: John A. Macdonald and the Politics of History

Andrew Nurse The Macdonald-Laurier Institute (MLI) and the Friends of Canadian History have issued a statement in “In Defence of Sir John A. Macdonald and his Legacy.” The statement–which is actually not just a statement but a petition—is...
From: Borealia on 1 Feb 2021

Transcribathon 2021: Revealing Recipes

4 March 2021Revealing Recipes: Top Tips from Early Modern Women: Lady Sedley’s from the RCP and Lady Ayscough’s from the Wellcome Collection Please join the Early Modern Recipe Online Collective (EMROC), Royal College of Physicians...
From: emroc on 27 Jan 2021

A. C. Elias, Jr., Irish-American Research Travel Fellowship

Joel W. Herman has been awarded the A. C. Elias, Jr., Irish-American Research Travel Fellowship for 2021 by the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS). The award will assist Mr. Herman, a Ph.D. student in history at Trinity College...

4 Cautionary Tales from the French Revolution for Today

This paper is an outgrowth of a talk given at the Newberry library on January 15, 2021. By Christine Adams Many Americans may be tempted to interpret Biden’s inauguration as the opening of a new chapter, and in many ways it is, but we must...
From: Age of Revolutions on 22 Jan 2021

Picture of the Week #635

Cross stitch of Catherine of Aragon’s badge and other mementos at her grave in Peterborough Cathedral. Photo May 2015 Since I didn’t do a books and events round-up for this month because of the continued delays, etc. due to the pandemic, I...
From: TudorHistory.org Blog on 18 Jan 2021

January 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “A POEM on the Execution of William Shaw.” True crime!  News of the murder of Edward East circulated widely in New England.  The Massachusetts Gazette and...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Jan 2021

Whifflers, boy players and drummers: project team presents findings

On 13th January 2021 project PI Tracey Hill and postdoctoral research assistant Charlie Berry gave a paper to the Institute of Historical Research’s Centre for People, Place and Community seminar. Tracey and Charlie introduced the methods and...

Cromwell Museum’s Winter Lecture Series

Hear ye! Earlier this evening, historian Paul Lay was the first speaker in the Cromwell Museum’s Winter Lecture Series and gave a really fascinating talk about the West Indies during the time of the Cromwellian Protectorate, with figures such as...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 14 Jan 2021

Trial by Combat

Like most Americans, I am outraged by the pillaging of the Capitol on Wednesday by a mob incited by the President of the United States and his personal lawyer, once a serious figure, now a joke, who called for “Trial by Combat”. Tears and...
From: streets of salem on 9 Jan 2021

Seminar in the History of the Book, 2021

Seminar in the History of the Book, Hilary Term 2021 Fridays at 2:15pm (GMT) On-line: register to receive a link to each meeting, by e-mail to: bookcentre@bodleian.ox.ac.uk Conveners: Cristina Dondi (Lincoln College, Oxford) and Alexandra Franklin (Bodleian...
From: The Conveyor on 7 Jan 2021

Debating (American) Democracy

Jerry Bannister Like everyone else this evening, I’m struggling to keep up with the news. What’s striking about the latest crisis in the United States is that, even at the very heart of American power, there remains so much confusion about...
From: Borealia on 7 Jan 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.