The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Family"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Family found 553 posts

The Prince Regent’s Grand Fete 1811

In 1811, George, became the Prince Regent, taking over from his father who was incapacitated. One of the first things he did was organise a Grand Fete at his home, Carlton House, reputedly to celebrate his father’s birthday, but for a guess it was simply...
From: All Things Georgian on 27 Sep 2021

Sir Thomas More and Jane Austen

Sir Thomas More will be familiar to many of us from Robert Bolt’s stage play and 1966 film, A Man For All Seasons, and from Hilary Mantel’s more recent book, Wolf Hall. For those persons who confine their reading to the six novels of a certain Georgian...
From: Jane Austen's World on 25 Jul 2021

July 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “THE imprudent Behaviour of my Son JESSE HALL, lays me under the painful Necessity of forwarning all Persons from harbouring or concealing him.” Conradt Wolff lamented that...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Jul 2021

George Austen as a Father

Jane Austen's father's support of his talented daughter and encouragement of her writing set her down the path of greatness.
From: Jane Austen's World on 30 Jun 2021

A Juneteenth Tour

I learned about Juneteenth ridiculously late, from a student! It was about five or six years ago (only!) and I was talking about Salem’s Black Picnic, an old tradition recently revived, with a brilliant African-American student and she said “that...
From: streets of salem on 19 Jun 2021

A Derby House in Medfield

I busted out of Salem yesterday and took a road trip to Norfolk county in Massachusetts, southwest of Boston, and drove through a string of towns beginning with M: Medfield, Millis, Medway, Milford, Mendon. My “destination” was a first-period...
From: streets of salem on 8 Apr 2021

Favouritism in Georgian England

Today we see favouring one child over another as a risk to happy family life and psychologically damaging for those who are least favoured. This is by no means new. Moral commentators and writers on parenting have long warned parents against favouritism,...
From: Joanne Begiato Muses on History on 8 Apr 2021

“You know I am no epicure”: Enslaved Voices in Eliza Lucas Pinckney’s Receipt Book

By Rachel Love Monroy The Papers of the Revolutionary Era Pinckney Statesmen The Pinckney Papers Project at the University of South Carolina includes both the Papers of Eliza Lucas Pinckney (1722-1793) and Harriott Pinckney Horry (1748-1830) and The Papers...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Apr 2021

March 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Publisher will give two Copies gratis to such as shall collect One Dozen of Subscribers.” When John Fleeming of Boston set about publishing what he billed as “The...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Mar 2021

My Soda Bread

By Kathleen Lynch There was something wrong about the package that was delivered to me at work one early spring morning years ago. It was addressed to me, and the return address also had my surname. But I didn’t recognize the name as a family member,...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Mar 2021

A Great Tea-Drinking: Collective Memory and Victorian Invalid Cookery

By Bonnie Shishko Midway through Charles Dickens’s Bleak House (1853), Esther Summerson relinquishes her beloved role as adopted housekeeper and assumes another: sick nurse. In a tense scene that’s painfully relevant in this era of COVID,...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Mar 2021

Grandma Sloan’s Houska

By Lina Perkins Wilder My family makes houska wrong. Hoska [sic] 2 cakes yeast ¼ c lukewarm water 1 c milk scalded ½ c sugar ¼ c shortening 2 t salt 4 ½-5 c sifted flour 2 T fennel seed 2 eggs ½ c raisins ½ c...
From: The Recipes Project on 16 Mar 2021

Pächter Torte

By Simon Newman 15 dkg Zucker (15 decagrams sugar) Many of the recipes we use are filled with memories. I use pastry recipes that go back to my grandmother, probably even further. As I make them I remember her and my mother, I remember them making pies...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Feb 2021

A Recipe for Music: Notating Domestic Singing in Seventeenth-Century England

By Sarah Koval Mary Chantrell and others, recipe book, f.92v, 1690, MS 1548. Image credit: Wellcome Library, London. Mary Chantrell’s book of recipes for food and medicines (1690) is typical of the manuscript recipe genre: a handwritten, bound book...
From: The Recipes Project on 18 Feb 2021

A Request for Memories or Recipes Related to Beans and Rice

By Heather Ariyeh Background Do you have a favorite memory or recipe related to beans and rice? Throughout the world, people have combined beans and rice to form popular dishes. Together, they form a complete protein, but perhaps even more interestingly...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Feb 2021

The Persistent Legend of Princess Elizabeth (1770-1840) and the mysterious George Ramus

Well, this certainly was not a proverbial rabbit hole I expected to find myself down when this beautiful portrait caught my eye. I simply wanted to know more about the young lady whose beauty had been captured by George Romney. The portrait is of ‘Elizabeth...
From: All Things Georgian on 3 Feb 2021

The Vyne, The Chute Family & The Austens, by Tony Grant

Inquiring readers: One of the activities I have missed the most during this year of the COVID-19 is traveling abroad. In this blog post, Tony Grant takes us on a tour to The Vyne, which is one of England’s grand houses closely associated with Jane...
From: Jane Austen's World on 17 Jan 2021

Caroline Remond Putnam

Faithful readers of this blog will know that I am captivated by the Remonds, an African-American family of ten who lead exemplary lives of advocacy, activism and entrepreneurialism in Salem in the nineteenth-century, often centered around Hamilton Hall,...
From: streets of salem on 26 Dec 2020

Trouble with the In-laws? Marriage and Murder in Thirteenth-Century England

Posted by Sara M. Butler; 25 November 2020. On Saturday, June 15, 1287, an inquest was held at the king’s prison of Carlisle (Cumbria) into accusations against William le Macegrene of Langrigg, arrested and imprisoned for the homicide of Richard...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 25 Nov 2020

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part Four

We have now reached the final part of the story and just in case you missed any, the previous parts can be found by clicking these links – Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. In this final part we return again to George and his wife Mary. In 1817 and they went...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Oct 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.