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Search Results for "Farah Karim-Cooper"

Your search for posts with tags containing Farah Karim-Cooper found 12 posts

Public talk: “Racialising Mortality in Early Visual Culture and the Shakespearean Stage” by Dr Farah Karim-Cooper – 3rd December 2019

“Racialising Mortality in Early Visual Culture and the Shakespearean Stage” by Dr Farah Karim-Cooper . Tuesday 3rd December 2019, at 5pm,  in the Samuel Beckett Theatre, Trinity College Dublin   As part of the Whitfield...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 19 Nov 2019

Fireworks for Queen Elizabeth

Zoe Laughlin and Lucy Worsley in Fireworks for a Tudor Queen One of the most famous legends of Shakespeare’s life is the story that Shakespeare might have attended some of the celebrations that accompanied Queen Elizabeth 1’s visit to Kenilworth...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 26 Mar 2018

“a voice potential/As double as the duke’s” : War, Disability, and Casting in Iqbal Khan’s Othello

“a voice potential/As double as the duke’s” : War, Disability, and Casting in Iqbal Khan’s Othello By Kelsey Ridge, University of Birmingham SAN DIEGO (Oct. 5, 2010) Former Army soldier Melissa Stockwell, from Chicago, speaks...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 25 Nov 2016

‘Gesture on the Shakespearean Stage’, Dr Farah Karim-Cooper, Friday 27 May, Abbey theatre

UCD / Abbey Shakespeare lecture on Friday 27th May, 4pm on the Abbey stage. ‘Gesture on the Shakespearean Stage’ This talk explores the question of how in the sixteenth and seventeenth century playhouses Shakespeare’s actors used gesture...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 26 May 2016

Plays and performances in Shakespeare’s theatres

I recently wrote about how Shakespeare leaves gaps within the text which actors are able to fill using their own imaginations. I’ve been reading a book that describes how theatres themselves contributed to the writing and performance of plays, an...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 12 Dec 2014

Shakespeare Research in the Digital Age

In my last post I spent some time reflecting on the introduction to Shakespeare and the Digital World by way of the Year of Shakespeare project; in this post I want to dive right into part one of Carson and Kirwan’s edited collection, which focuses...
From: Digital Shakespeares on 9 Jul 2014

Duchess of Malfi (Webster/Dromgoole), Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, Feb 2014

The Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, the Globe’s new indoor space, is really as small as all the reviews say. I thought the critics were exaggerating, but no: it’s tiny, a mere 40 by 55 feet. To be fair, that makes it no smaller than many a blackbox...
From: dispositio on 15 Feb 2014

Devine and Wanamaker: two giants of the theatre

Last Tuesday I heard the stories of two men who each played crucial roles in the twentieth-century theatre, born within a few years of each other, but while one is a household name, the other is often overlooked. These men are Sam Wanamaker and George...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 17 Sep 2013

Ten Reasons to get excited about The Sam Wanamaker Playhouse at Shakespeare’s Globe

In January of 2014, Shakespeare’s Globe will be moving indoors. The much anticipated Sam Wanamaker Playhouse will open with a season of early modern plays. But why should anyone be interested in this new theatre when the great Globe itself has been...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 4 May 2013

KiSS: Farah Karim-Cooper on The Taming of the Shrew

KINGSTON SHAKESPEARE SEMINAR (KiSS) APRIL 25: 5.30pm: Rose Theatre 2013 SHAKESPEARE BIRTHDAY LECTURE: FARAH KARIM COOPER HEAD OF RESEARCH SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE ” TAMING KATE: PASSIONS AND HUMOURS IN ‘THE TAMING OF THE SHREW’ “ FREE...
From: Cardiff Shakespeare on 20 Apr 2013

What happens in Hamlet?

We perform digital analysis on literary texts not to answer questions, but to generate questions. The questions digital analysis can answer are generally not ‘interesting’ in a humanist sense: but the questions digital analysis provokes often...
From: Wine Dark Sea on 17 Aug 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.